Catalog Year : 2020-21

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Administrative Syst/Bus Educ

Administrative Syst/Bus Educ


ABED 3100 - Business Communication
Credits: 3.00
A study of written and oral business communication to develop process and theory skills including writing, speaking, listening, business meetings, teamwork, presentations, and cross-cultural communication. Students write standard business letters and deliver oral and written presentations and reports. Management concepts of business ethics and problem analysis are integrated with communication process and theory.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Marketing/Real Estate
Pre-requisites: ( COMM 1110 or XIDS 1004 or ENGL 2050 or THEA 2050 or ART 2000 or PHIL 2020 or COMM 1100 or SPAN 1001 or SPAN 1002 or FREN 1001 or FREN 1002 or GRMN 1001 or GRMN 1002 ) and ENGL 1101 Minimum Grade: C and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ABED 4118 - Business Web Design
Credits: 3.00
The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to Web design. Students will learn concepts related to planning and developing web sites by studying Web usability, multimedia, and Web 2.0 applications for business and education web sites. (same as MKTG 4818).
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Business
Department: Marketing/Real Estate
Pre-requisites: MKTG 3803


ABED 4181 - Independent Study
Credits: 3.00
Each professor will be responsible for specific course content, assignments, and course requirements based upon the nature of the course for each independent assignment.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Marketing/Real Estate


ABED 6100 - Strateg Business Communication
Credits: 3.00
This course is an integrative approach to the study of strategic business communication found in corporations, organizations, and small businesses today. There is a strong focus on developing credibility and the art of persuasion which allows students to approach the development of effective business messages from a strategic and reflective standpoint. Students analyze case studies that allow for critical thinking and problem solving in business communication including team building, conflict resolution, public relations, marketing, management, and leadership. The development of business plans through team building and exhibiting leadership skills frame the content of this course providing an active and enriched learning experience.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Marketing/Real Estate


ABED 6106 - Eval & Testing in Bus Ed
Credits: 3.00
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with methods of evaluation and testing in business education. Students will be exposed to essential concepts and skills of measurement topics. Students will also complete a Position Paper of a current Business Education topic in order to complete graduation requirements. Students must receive a grade of no lower than 'B' on the research paper in order to satisfy graduation requirements.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Marketing/Real Estate


ABED 6107 - Instruct Strat for Technology
Credits: 3.00
A study of issues, methodologies, applications, and current research in teaching business technology courses using the Read/Write Web and Web 2.0 applications.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Marketing/Real Estate


ABED 6118 - Instruct Strat. Web Page Dsgn
Credits: 3.00
In this course, students will learn the basics of designing and creating web pages and publish them on the Internet. Activities will include layout and design techniques to include graphics animation, URL links, graphic images, e-mail links, backgrounds and textures, font manipulation, and other formatting techniques for web page creation. Students will discuss techniques for evaluating web page design in a classroom environment.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Marketing/Real Estate


ABED 6128 - Instr Strat for Basic Business
Credits: 3.00
A study of learning theories, models, methodologies and current research; used in teaching basic business subjects.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Marketing/Real Estate


ABED 6146 - Supervision and Leadership
Credits: 3.00
A study of: functions of administration, supervision and leadership in business and education. This course will provide students with an opportunity to gain an understanding of administrative processes and leadership roles/responsibilities. Federal, state and local program requirements and initiatives related to technology/career education will be examined.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Marketing/Real Estate


ABED 6160 - Cur Prac Wrkforce Learn & Perf
Credits: 3.00
Emphasis is on developing workplace learning programs to meet business challenges in organizational settings. Adult learning theories and strategic workforce learning practices are the main focus of this course. Additionally, methods of enhancing employee competencies and performance in the workplace will be addressed through a comprehensive term project.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Marketing/Real Estate


ABED 6181 - Independent Project
Credits: 3.00
Preparation of an independent project under the direction of the major professor.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Marketing/Real Estate


ABED 6183 - Intro to Research in Bus Ed
Credits: 3.00
Overview of quantitative and qualitative research process; includes concepts and methods for conducting and evaluating research in the field of business education.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Marketing/Real Estate


ABED 6507 - Curric Teaching Business Subj
Credits: 3.00
Students examine planned educational experiences which can take place in the multiple context of the school. The following types of questions serve as parameters for study of the business curriculum: What educational purposes should be accomplished? How can learning attain these objectives? How to organize learning experiences for effective instruction? How to effectively evaluate learning experiences? Field experience and professional activities are required.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Business
Department: Marketing/Real Estate
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ABED 6537 - Methods Teaching Business Subj
Credits: 4.00
A study of learning principles, methods, strategies and knowledge related to teaching business subjects. Students create and demonstrate well-planned content-based lessons and educational experiences demonstrating planned patterned behaviors as definite steps by which the teacher influences learning. A meta-analysis of research-based instruction is examined. As an integral part of the course, field experience, professional activities, and seminars are required.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 4.00
College: College of Business
Department: Marketing/Real Estate
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE



Accounting

Accounting


ACCT 2101 - Principles of Accounting I
Credits: 3.00
A study of the underlying theory and application of financial accounting concepts. Requires overall GPA of 2.0.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: GPA 2.00 or above required 2.00


ACCT 2102 - Principles of Accounting II
Credits: 3.00
A study of underlying theory and application of managerial accounting concepts. Requires overall GPA of 2.0.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2101 and GPA 2.00 or above required 2.0


ACCT 3212 - Financial Reporting I
Credits: 3.00
An in-depth study of the accounting and reporting processes and accounting theory together with current problems in reporting financial position and determining income. Includes study of valuation problems involving current assets; and property, plant, and equipment. AICPA Level I test fee is required.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2101 Minimum Grade: C and ACCT 2102 Minimum Grade: C and GPA 2.00 or above required 2.00 and College of Business Maj-Minor 1 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 3213 - Financial Reporting II
Credits: 3.00
A continuation of ACCT 3212 with emphasis on the measurement and reporting of intangibles, liabilities, corporate capital, investments, and cash flows.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 3212 Minimum Grade: C and ( GPA 2.00 or above required 2.00 and College of Business Maj-Minor 1 ) and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 3214 - Financial Reporting III
Credits: 3.00
A continuation of ACCT 3213 with emphasis on specific measurement and reporting problems including taxes, pensions, leases, accounting changes, disclosure issues, income recognition issues, partnerships, and foreign currency transactions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 3212 Minimum Grade: C and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 3232 - Managerial Accounting
Credits: 3.00
Cost Accounting principles and techniques applied to job order and process types of industry, planning, and control of the elements of production costs, and preparation of cost reports. Includes an introduction to standard costing concepts and variance analysis. Use of cost information for business policy implementation and cost topics.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2101 Minimum Grade: C and ACCT 2102 Minimum Grade: C and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 3241 - Fraud Examination
Credits: 3.00
A survey of how and why occupational fraud is committed, how fraudulent conduct can be deterred, and how allegations of fraud should be investigated and resolved. The increase level of complexity and the heightened awareness of frauds makes the ability to detect and address fraud in businesses a critical skills for accountants, auditors, managers, and investigators. The inter-disciplinary nature of the course makes it appropriate and useful for both accounting and non-accounting majors.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2101 Minimum Grade: C and ACCT 2102 Minimum Grade: C and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 3250 - Intermediate Accounting I
Credits: 3.00
Accounting theory and practice related to preparation and presentation of corporate financial statements in accordance with GAAP. Emphasis on acquisition of assets and services.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2101 Minimum Grade: C and ACCT 2102 Minimum Grade: C


ACCT 3251 - Income Tax Acctng/Individuals
Credits: 3.00
A study of the Internal Revenue Code as it relates to individuals. Updated each offering to incorporate new tax laws, regulations, and rulings in print.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2101 Minimum Grade: C and ACCT 2102 Minimum Grade: C and ( GPA 2.00 or above required 2.00 and College of Business Maj-Minor 1 ) and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 3260 - Intermediate Accounting II
Credits: 3.00
Accounting theory and practice related to preparation and presentation of corporate financial statements in accordance with GAAP. Continuation of ACCT 3250 with emphasis on fixed assets, liabilities, stockholders' equity, and investments.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ACCT 3250 Minimum Grade: C


ACCT 3270 - Intermediate Accounting III
Credits: 3.00
Continuation of ACCT 3260 with emphasis on special issues related to income measurement, asset and liability valuation and recent developments in the accounting profession.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ACCT 3250 Minimum Grade: C


ACCT 3280 - Cost Accounting
Credits: 3.00
The basic theory and practice related to determination of cost of products and services provided by a business and providing accounting information to management.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2102 Minimum Grade: C


ACCT 3285 - Professional Seminar
Credits: 1.00
Students attend 14 presentations by: UWG Career Services; international, regional and local public accounting firms; nonprofit and governmental public accounting firms; corporate accountants; professional accounting organizations (IMA, GSCPAs, others); accounting educators; and professional examination review services. A professional resume must be prepared. This seminar is an Accounting BBA degree requirement.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2101 Minimum Grade: C and ACCT 2102 Minimum Grade: C and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 4202 - Financial Statement Analysis
Credits: 3.00
A study of the use of financial statements and managerial reports by managers and investors in decision making for day to day operations and long range planning.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2102 Minimum Grade: D and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 4210 - Accounting Systems
Credits: 3.00
Covers the theory and design of automated procedures of accumulation and reporting information with special emphasis on internal control.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2102 Minimum Grade: C


ACCT 4215 - Financial Reporting IV
Credits: 3.00
A study of consolidated financial statements and nonprofit accounting.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 3212 Minimum Grade: C and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 4230 - Income Tax Accounting
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the income tax laws with emphasis on taxation of individuals
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2102 Minimum Grade: C


ACCT 4233 - Strategic Cost Management
Credits: 3.00
The study of contemporary management control tools and business strategy.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2102 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 4235 - Advanced Income Tax Acct.
Credits: 3.00
A continuation of ACCT 4230 with emphasis on taxation of property transactions and business organizations, particularly corporations partnerships and S-corporations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ACCT 4230 Minimum Grade: C


ACCT 4240 - Not-for-Profit Accounting
Credits: 3.00
Accounting theory and practice related to non-business organizations; governments and other non-profit organizations
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ACCT 3260 Minimum Grade: C or ACCT 3270 Minimum Grade: C


ACCT 4241 - Accounting Information Systems
Credits: 3.00
A specialized in-depth accounting course which addresses documentation of accounting systems, including flowcharts; evaluation of internal control and the audit trail; impact of computers on internal control; and design of accounting systems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2101 Minimum Grade: C and ACCT 2102 Minimum Grade: C and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 4250 - Advanced Cost Accounting
Credits: 3.00
Advanced Cost Accounting topics include: Budgeting (both Static and Flexible), Strategic Pricing and Cost Measurement, Strategic Performance Measurement, Service and Split-off cost allocation, Responsibility Accounting, and Measuring and Assigning Costs for Income Statements.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ACCT 3280 Minimum Grade: C


ACCT 4252 - Income Tax Acct/Organizations
Credits: 3.00
A study of the Internal Revenue Code as it relates to corporate, partnership, and fiduciary tax. The legal and tax aspects considered in selecting an organization form.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 3251 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 4261 - Auditing
Credits: 3.00
The course is designed to give the student an understanding of auditing objectives and standards, and a working knowledge of auditing procedures and techniques. Standards, ethics, and legal responsibilities of the public accounting profession, as well as preparation of audit reports are emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 3213 and ACCT 4241 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 4262 - Assurance Srvs, Fraud & Ethics
Credits: 3.00
A study of assurance and advisory services, business risk assessment, new audit methodologies, fraud detection, ethics, and other contemporary auditing issues.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 4261 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 4265 - Sustain Accounting & Reporting
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the tripartite or triple bottom line reporting framework that highlights the economic, environmental, and social performance of an organization. Emphasis is placed on how sustainability creates shareholder value and on how sustainable performance helps investors, creditors, and other users distinguish between companies operating efficiently and those which are not.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2101 and ACCT 2102 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 4280 - Contemp Issues in Accounting
Credits: 3.00
Study of accounting history, accounting theory, accounting institutions and contemporary issues in accounting.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ACCT 3260 Minimum Grade: C or ACCT 3270 Minimum Grade: C


ACCT 4285 - Special Problems in Accounting
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
In-depth supervised individual study of one or more current problems of the accounting profession.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 4286 - Bus Internship (Accounting)
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Practical accounting internship experience with a commercial firm or organization for selected upper division students.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ACCT 4290 - Internal Controls and Auditing
Credits: 3.00
A study of systems of internal accounting control in organizations, their design and evaluation; and an introduction to the basic principles and techniques of auditing.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ACCT 3260 Minimum Grade: C or ACCT 3270 Minimum Grade: C


ACCT 4390 - Accounting Internship
Credits: 3.00
Professional accounting experience obtained by employment with a public accounting firm, a business, or other organization while under the supervision of a partner, manager, or other office of the sponsoring organization. Permission of the Dean required.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ACCT 3250 Minimum Grade: C or ACCT 5250 Minimum Grade: C


ACCT 5233 - Strategic Cost Management
Credits: 3.00
The study of contemporary management control tools and business strategy.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2102


ACCT 5265 - Sustainability Acct & Report
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the tripartite or triple bottom line reporting framework that highlights the economic, environmental, and social performance of an organization. Emphasis is placed on how sustainability creates shareholder value and on how sustainable performance helps investors, creditors, and other users distinguish between companies operating efficiently and those which are not.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2101 and ACCT 2102


ACCT 6216 - Seminar in Financial Reporting
Credits: 3.00
In-depth analysis of and research on current topics in accounting; theoretical analysis of recent accounting pronouncements and the study of current literature in accounting. Ethical issues in financial reporting are emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance


ACCT 6232 - Managerial Accounting
Credits: 3.00
An analysis of accounting information and other data as aids to management in choosing among possible courses of action. Not open to MPAcc students or students with an undergraduate degree in Accounting.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance


ACCT 6233 - Seminar in Cost Accounting
Credits: 3.00
Designed for the student with past exposure to cost accounting concepts/applications. The course emphasizes research of the current topics affecting the information providing function of the managerial accounting process. Ethical issues are emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 6232 Minimum Grade: C or ACCT 3232 Minimum Grade: C


ACCT 6242 - Strategic Information Systems
Credits: 3.00
A study of the identification and modeling of buisness processes and analysis and design of accounting information systems for business processes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance


ACCT 6253 - Seminar in Tax Accounting
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the federal tax treatment of fiduciaries, gifts, estates, corporations and partnerships. Emphasis is placed upon the formation of the entity, elements of gross income, treatment of property dispositions, allowable deductions and credits, determination of entity and investor basis, and liquidation of the entity. Tax research is emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance


ACCT 6263 - Seminar in Auditing
Credits: 3.00
Advanced problems and research in the application of auditing standards; internal control evaluations; applications of statistics; audits of EDP systems; auditors' ethical, legal and reporting obligations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance


ACCT 6264 - Nonprofit Accounting/Auditing
Credits: 3.00
Principles and practices of fund accounting are examined with emphasis upon their adaptation to nonprofit institutions. The course includes measuring efficiency and economic use of resources to satisfy legal reporting as well as societal requirements. Auditing the reports and operations of nonprofit organizations is emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance


ACCT 6285 - Special Problems in Accounting
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
In-depth supervised individual study of one or more current problems of the accounting profession.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance


ACCT 6286 - Internship
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Practical accounting internship experience with a commercial firm or organization for selected students.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance



Anthropology

Anthropology


ANTH 1100 - Faces of Culture
Credits: 2.00
Survey of cross-cultural similarities and differences from a global, anthropological perspective. The course features dramatic and unique film footage, embracing cultures from all continents, highlighting major lifestyles, and illustrating human adaptations to a variety of environments. The course also explores the ways in which North American culture fits into the broad range of human possibilities.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 1101 - Voices of Culture
Credits: 3.00
ANTH 1101 Voices of Culture engages students in comparing and contrasting cultural patterns of oral and written language. Students will learn about their attitudes toward language and their own ways of speaking in order to better understand the diverse linguistic practices of others.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 1102 - Intro to Anthropology
Credits: 3.00
A four-subfield introduction to the analysis and explanation of cultural similarities and differences. Discoveries, theories, problems, and debates on issues of fundamental importance to the understanding of human nature, society, and behavior through the study of cultural anthropology, biological/physical anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and archaeology.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 1105 - Intro to Physical Anthropology
Credits: 3.00
An examination of humans from biological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics of survey and analysis include systems of human and non-human inheritance and evolution, primatology, origins, variation and adaptation, forensic anthropology, and interactions between biology and culture.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 2001 - Introduction to Archaeology
Credits: 3.00
Survey of Archaeology as a subfield of Anthropology. Content includes basic theoretical concepts, analytic methods, and interpretive models of scientific archaeology. Specific concerns include reconstruction of cultural systems and their adaptive patterns through recovery and analysis of material remains.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 2002 - Intro to Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.00
A broad ethnographic introduction to the customs and behaviors of people in several cultures. This class will examine a diverse range of contemporary cultures and explore different social structures, belief systems, and adaptations through exemplary case studies in the subfield of Cultural Anthropology.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 2004 - Statistical Methods Anthropolo
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an introduction to the use of quantitative analysis methods in anthropological research. Topics will include descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, and multivariate statistics. Students will be expected to gain a basic understanding of the logic behind each test, when it should be used, and how results should be interpreted.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 3103 - Archaeological Lab Methods
Credits: 3.00
Instruction in the techniques used in cleaning, cataloging, preserving, and analysis of excavated archaeological materials.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 3104 - The Survivalist's Toolkit
CEUs: 3.00
This course provides a hands-on approach to understanding the archaeological record by making, using, and analyzing prehistoric technologies, including stone tools, pottery, and bone tools.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 3110 - Human Osteology
Credits: 3.00
This course will introduce students to the basics of skeletal biology and learn how to accurately identify the elements of the human skeleton. It will include the major landmarks of each skeletal element with an aim to understanding the functional morphology of bones in an individual and as an anatomical system.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 3158 - Economic Anthropology
Credits: 3.00
An anthropological investigation of how pre-industrial societies produced, distributed and consumed goods, resources, and services.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 3170 - Religion in America: Shakers
Credits: 3.00
This hands-on religion course will focus on the practice of religion in historical and contemporary Utopian societies in the U.S. By examining the development and legacy of one of America’s most quintessential religious communities, the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing (known as the Shakers), students will gain a wide range of skills and opportunities to explore diverse approaches to religion, theory, and methodology in anthropology. We will also examine other Utopian religious societies as comparative examples. There will be a class travel component and additional Course Fees associated with this course during most semesters.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 3180 - Environmental Anthropology
Credits: 3.00
The focus of this course is on the relationship between cultural behavior and environmental phenomena. Local, regional, and global case studies will be used in examining the political and cultural ecology of resource use, adaptation, and degradation. Possible topics include environmental justice, deforestation, and conservation, industrial waste, and watershed management.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 3186 - Anthropology of Gender
Credits: 3.00
This course examines various theories of gender development and the positions of women and men cross-culturally.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 3188 - Ethnographic Field Methods
Credits: 4.00
This course will investigate and evaluate qualitative analysis in ethnographic field research. The course is participation intensive and will involve research in an actual field project.
Lab: 8.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 3200 - Directed Research
Credits: 2.00 to 6.00
This is a research project carried out under the guidance of a faculty member. Discussion of research areas with the faculty must be completed before registration. A formal report of the results of the research must be presented to the faculty of the Anthropology program.
Lab: 4.00 to 12.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Pre-requisites: ANTH 1102


ANTH 3250 - Field Methods in Physical Anth
Credits: 4.00
In this practical Course, students will learn and apply basic lab and field methods in Physical Anthropology. We will explore techniques used in osteology, forensics, bioarchaeology, primatology, and paleoanthropology through hands on activities, guided research, presentation, and written reports.
Lab: 8.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4100 - Hist Anthropological Thought
Credits: 3.00
A survey of major conceptual and theoretical developments in anthropology from the early nineteenth century to the present.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4102 - Archaeological Field Research
Credits: 4.00
Direct participation in all aspects of an archaeological excavation project. Instruction in research design, excavation techniques, recording procedures, data analyses, and field interpretation.
Lab: 8.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4103 - Field Mthds in Cult Res Mgmt
CEUs: 4.00
Direct participation in a Cultural Resource Assessment Survey (CRAS) project. Instruction in archaeological survey, mapping, excavation techniques, artifact identification, and artifact processing.
Lab: 8.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4105 - Environmental Archaeology
Credits: 3.00
This course will examine long-term human-environmental interaction from an archaeological perspective.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4115 - North American Archaeology
Credits: 3.00
A survey of the pre-Columbian cultural development of North America north of Mexico.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4122 - Bioarchaeology
CEUs: 3.00
Bioarchaeology uses human remains to reconstruct the lifestyles of past individuals and populations. In this course, students will build a solid knowledge of methods used in the discipline for the discovery of remains and the reconstruction of subsistence, diet, disease, demography, trauma, and physical activity, and the contextual interpretations of results.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4125 - Forensic Anthropology
Credits: 3.00
This course will include a detailed study of the human skeleton. Primary focus will be on the methods used to identify human remains within a legal context. Responsibilities and ethics of a forensic anthropologist will be discussed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4130 - Medical Anthropology
Credits: 3.00
This course provides a general introduction to concepts in medical anthropology, considering health, illness and healing from a biocultural standpoint. Topics covered include cross-cultural understandings of mental and physical health issues, global perspectives on health, and careers in medical anthropology.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4132 - Human Life Cyc Cross-Cult Pers
Credits: 3.00
A cross-cultural study of the social and cultural meanings of human experience through such phases as birth and death; adolescence; adulthood; and old age.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4134 - Animals and Culture
Credits: 3.00
The relationship between humans and animals is complex, multidimensional and historically derived. This course will examine primary theories related to ecology and symbolism and identify the historical and contemporary role of animals in human society.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4135 - Genes and Genomania
Credits: 3.00
This Medical Anthropology course builds a basic understanding of new genetic techniques and research directions, uncovering sources of contention between scientific and public perceptions on the genetic revolution.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4144 - Peoples & Cultures Latin Amer
Credits: 3.00
An ethnohistorical and ethnographic perspective of indigenous peoples of Latin America (including Central America; South America, and the Caribbean), with an emphasis on the Inca State and contemporary Andean people.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4146 - Latin@s in the United States
CEUs: 3.00
This course provides an in-depth exploration of anthropological research into the diverse ethnic, national, racial, linguistic, religious, cultural traditions, and immigration experiences of Latin@s living in the United States. It will investigate the many meaning of Latinidad, a broad-sweeping term that encompasses the heterogeneity of populations in the United States and elsewhere that trace their ancestry to various parts of Latin America.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4150 - Human Evolution
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on the evolution of humans and our nearest relatives using evidence from fossil record and genetic analysis. It places special importance on human origins while addressing modern and future human variability from perspectives both ethical and philosophical.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Pre-requisites: ANTH 1105 or BIOL 1107 or BIOL 1010


ANTH 4155 - People/Cult Sub-Saharan Africa
Credits: 3.00
Study of selected African cultures with emphasis on social organization, belief systems, history, and politics.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4165 - Primatology
Credits: 3.00
Study of living prosimians, monkeys, and apes, including social organization, feeding and ranging, community ecology, and conservation. Readings will focus on field studies of natural populations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4170 - Myth, Magic and Religion
Credits: 3.00
A comparative and cross-cultural approach to religious systems and theories on the anthropology of religion.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4173 - Language and Culture
Credits: 3.00
A study of the history and perspectives of linguistic anthropology with special emphasis on the relationship between language and culture.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4175 - SE Archeaeology & Ethnohistory
CEUs: 3.00
A survey of Native American culture in Southeastern North America from the Paleoindian to colonial periods.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4176 - Narratv&Strytllng in Ethngrphy
CEUs: 4.00
This course will study examples of the stories and narratives that anthropologists collect during fieldwork and those that they produce later, when they are back at their desks reflecting on their experiences. Students will be asked to think critically about the various forms of storytelling we engage in, as well as to consider the power of representation through text.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4181 - Cultural Resources Management
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the history of the field of cultural resource management including major federal and state laws that govern the preservation of cultural resources. Attention will be given to archeological, historical, and architectural applications.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4184 - Anthropology Capstone
Credits: 3.00
Students translate their cumulative knowledge in anthropology to analyze current human challenges and to examine anthropology as a gateway to professional careers. It includes a project that enables them to reflect on what they learned and apply it to a broader context.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Pre-requisites: ANTH 1102 or ANT 101


ANTH 4186 - Internship
Credits: 1.00 to 6.00
Practical experience with a public or private agency directly related to a field of anthropology.
Lab: 1.00 to 6.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Pre-requisites: ANTH 1102 or ANT 101


ANTH 4201 - Artifact Analysis
Credits: 3.00
This course is a hands-on introduction to interpreting artifacts from archaeological sites that focuses on the analysis of flaked stone tools, prehistoric ceramics, shell, bone, and perishables artifacts, and historic artifacts.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4202 - Rise & Fall of Ancient Civil
Credits: 3.00
This course explores the timing and diversity in the rise and fall of great civilizations around the world.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4881 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Title and description of the type of independent study to be offered will be specified on the variable credit form at time of registration. May be repeated for up to 10 hours for credit.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4885 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Individual topics in anthropology.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 4900 - Directed Reading
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Directed examination of a topic not normally offered by the program. Students must propose a detailed plan of reading stating precise learning objectives and secure the written consent of a supervising instructor before registration.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Pre-requisites: ANTH 1102


ANTH 4983 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Directed field or laboratory research. Students must propose a detailed plan of research stating problem and methods and secure the written permission of a supervising instructor before registration. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 4 hours.
Other: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 5102 - Archaeological Field Research
Credits: 3.00
Direct participation in all aspects of an archaeological excavation project. Instruction in research design, excavation techniques, recording procedures, data analyses, and field interpretation.
Other: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 5115 - North American Archaeology
Credits: 3.00
A graduate level survey of the pre-Columbian cultural development of North America north of Mexico.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 5130 - Medical Anthropology
Credits: 3.00
This course provides a general introduction to concepts in medical anthropology, considering health, illness and healing from a biocultural standpoint. Topics covered include cross-cultural understandings of mental and physical health issues, global perspectives on health, and careers in medical anthropology.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 5132 - Human Life Cyc Cross-Cult Pers
Credits: 3.00
A cross-cultural study of the social and cultural meanings of human experience through such phases as birth and death; adolescence; adulthood; and old age.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 5144 - Peoples & Cultures Latin Amer
Credits: 3.00
An ethnohistorical and ethnographic perspective of indigenous peoples of Latin America (including Central America, South America, and the Caribbean), with an emphasis on the Inca State and contemporary Andean people.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 5155 - People/Cult Sub-Saharan Africa
Credits: 3.00
Study of selected African cultures with emphasis on social organization, belief systems, history, and politics.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 5170 - Myth, Magic and Religion
Credits: 3.00
A comparative and cross-cultural approach to religious systems and theories on the anthropology of religion.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 5177 - Social Organization
Credits: 3.00
This course offers a broad introduction to issues of social organization and social differentiation. It will examine various theories in assessing the nature of social order and disorder. Kinship, marriage, ethnicity and class will be among the topics studied as factors of organization. Consideration of age and aging will be given special emphasis in the latter portion of the course. This course offers a broad introduction to issues of social organization and social differentiation. It will examine various theories in assessing the nature of social order and disorder. Kinship, marriage, ethnicity and class will be among the topics studied as factors of organization. Consideration of age and aging will be given special emphasis in the latter portion of the course.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Pre-requisites: ANTH 1102 or ANT 101


ANTH 5181 - Cultural Resources Management
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the history of the field of cultural resource management including major federal and state laws that govern the preservation of cultural resources. Attention will be given to archaeological, historical, and architectural applications.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Pre-requisites: ANTH 1102


ANTH 5885 - Special Topics in Anthropology
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Special topics in ethnology, linguistics physical anthropology or archeology at the graduate level.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 5900 - Directed Readings
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Directed examination of a topic not normally offered by the program. Students must propose a detailed plan of reading stating precise learning objectives and secure the written consent of a supervising instructor before registration.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 5950 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Directed field or laboratory research. Students must propose a detailed plan of research stating problem and methods and secure the written permission of a supervising instructor before registration.
Other: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 6103 - Field Methods Cult Rsrc Mgnmt
CEUs: 4.00
Direct participation in a Cultural Resource Assessment Survey (CRAS) project. Instruction in archaeological survey, mapping, and excavation techniques specifically used in cultural resource management. Additional training in crew supervision, in-field curatorial techniques, and technical report writing.
Lab: 8.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 6175 - Southeast Archaeology & Ethno
CEUs: 3.00
An in-depth seminar covering the different cultural traditions and temporal periods of Southeastern North America. Particular attention is focused on the relationship between different archaeological practices and the development of archaeological knowledge.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 6881 - Independent Study in ANTH
CEUs: 1.00 to 4.00
Title and description of the type of independent study to be offered will be specified on the variable credit form at time of registration. May be repeated for up to 8 hours credit.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 6885 - Special Topics in Anthropology
CEUs: 1.00 to 4.00
Special topics in cultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, physical anthropology or archaeology at the graduate level.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology


ANTH 7885 - Special Topics
Credits: 3.00
Individual topics in anthropology.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology



Art

Art


ART 1006 - Design I (2D)
Credits: 3.00
An introductory course dealing with the elements and principles of composition as they relate to the two-dimensional areas of the visual arts. For advising purposes, the Department of Art recommends that students take Design I (ART 1006) in conjunction with Drawing I (ART 1007).
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Co-requisites:


ART 1007 - Drawing I
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to drawing using various media and dealing with landscapes, still-life, one- and two-point perspective, and the figure. Both clothed and nude models may be used. For advising purposes, the Department of Art recommends that students take Design I (ART 1006) in conjunction with Drawing I (ART 1007).
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 1008 - Drawing II
Credits: 3.00
Drawing from the live model, both nude and clothed, focusing upon correct proportions and anatomy. A variety of drawing media will be used. For advising purposes, the Department of Art recommends that students take Design II (ART 1008) in conjunction with Drawing II (ART 1009).
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C


ART 1009 - Design II (3D)
Credits: 3.00
An introductory course dealing with the elements and principles of composition as they relate to the three-dimensional areas of the visual arts. For advising purposes the Department of Art recommends that students take Design II (ART 1008) in conjunction with Drawing II (ART 1009).
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 1201 - Introduction to Art
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the elements of art and to the various media: sculpture, painting, graphics, and architecture. These will be considered in their historical and contemporary culture contexts.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 2000 - Oral Communication/Visual Arts
Credits: 3.00
This course will develop a student's ability to formulate and organize thoughts about art in a clear and succinct manner and to give verbal expression to those ideas. Students will learn to analyze art and to formulate informed judgments about provocative issues pertinent to the visual arts.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 2011 - Art for Middle Grades
Credits: 3.00
This class is designed for the non-art major in middle grades education. The focus of the course will be on the development of lessons that encourage creative thinking through discipline based art education that is developmentally appropriate. Methods in art education include exploration of a variety of studio processes, as well as approaches to art history, art criticism and aesthetics. Interdisciplinary approaches to art education will be explored at the middle level.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 2012 - Art for Special Populations
Credits: 3.00
This class is designed for those students planning to enter the educational setting and teach special populations of students. The art curriculum in this course will be presented as a very child centered approach to art education, which has a primary goal the enhancement of the child's self esteem. Lessons are, therefore, presented as confidence builders that are designed to improve the general awareness and self-concept of the challenged student.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: SPED 2706 SPED 2706 or SPED 3715


ART 2201 - History of Western Art I
Credits: 3.00
This course covers the history of visual arts from pre-history to the fourteenth century, focusing upon the western tradition.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 2202 - History of Western Art II
Credits: 3.00
This course covers the history of visual arts from the High Renaissance to the present, focusing on the Western tradition.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 3000 - Art Early Childhood/Elementary
Credits: 2.00
This class is designed for the non-art major in early child hood education. The focus of the course will be to equip students to construct lessons that encourage creative thinking through art education and are developmentally appropriate for early childhood students. Methods in art education include exploration of a variety of studio processes as well as approaches to art history, art criticism, and aesthetics for the elementary student.
Lab: 4.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE


ART 3011 - Elementary Art Methods
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed for the art education major to focus on the developmental needs and abilities of students at the elementary level. Methods in art education include approaches to art pedagogy, production, criticism, and aesthetics utilizing a variety of age-appropriate studio media.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ( ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1101 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1102 Minimum Grade: C ) and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3012 - Art for Pre-K & Special Popul
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed for the art education major to focus on the developmental needs and abilities of pre-kindergarten and special education students with emphasis on accommodations and adaptive strategies. Methods in art education include approaches to art pedagogy, production, criticism, and aesthetics utilizing a variety of age-appropriate studio media.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ( ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1101 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1102 Minimum Grade: C ) and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3060 - Illustration: An Intro Survey
Credits: 3.00
This course is intended to introduce the student to the field of graphic illustration, including the history, purpose, and ways of creating an illustration. Exercises and assignments will stimulate narrative and critical thinking skills, development of a personal style, and exploration of various solutions to the same problem. Students will be introduced to a variety of media, with flexibility in their choice of media for given assignments. Students will learn, based on a client’s needs for a specific project, what is the appropriate approach to an assignment.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ( ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1101 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1102 Minimum Grade: C ) and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3065 - Intro to Sci/Pre-med Illustrat
Credits: 3.00
This course will familiarize the student with the art of scientific/pre-medical illustration, including the history, techniques, and varied applications. Students will acquire skills applicable to the fields of pre-medical, biological, botanical, entomological, archaeological, paleontological, anthropological and nursing illustration. Emphasis will be placed on the development of the student’s ability to accurately and clearly illustrate diagrammatically, narrative, and as a documentarian. Students will learn to incorporate and utilize research of the subject into their illustrations.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ( ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1101 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1102 Minimum Grade: C ) and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3100 - Art Abroad: (Dest of Travel)
Credits: 3.00
The course will discuss some aspects of the local history and art as related to the travel program. The relationship between politics, culture and their impact on artistic styles is emphasized. The discipline of history gives us a global prospective of political and social events and as well as the evidence of the underlying causes of those events. Art tells us the style, the change, the expression of people witnessing or affected by these events and possibly contributing to them. This class brings those two disciplines together to show how history changed art or how art changed history. Course may be repeated for up to 15 credit hours.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3150 - Studio Res Meth & Strat Abroad
Credits: 3.00
This course will focus on the means to collect data or materials, which can be utilized in the initiation of the creative process-essentially, the gathering of ones own experiences to influence the creation of physically tangible works of art. Course may be repeated for up to 15 credit hours.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Co-requisites: ART 3501
Pre-requisites: ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3151 - Studio Studies Abroad
Credits: 3.00
This course will focus on the processing of the material or data gathered to initiate and support content development within a student’s artwork and overall development. Students will be presented with a variety of potential perspectives from which to conduct content development from observations, and the culmination of data collected in the creation of a student’s own artwork. Course may be repeated for up to 15 credit hours.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Co-requisites: ART 3150
Pre-requisites: ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3210 - Non-Western Art
Credits: 3.00
Lecture-based course on selected topics in non-Western art of Asia, Africa, Oceania, or the New World, studying artworks from within or across these cultures in their cultural and historical contexts. May be repeated up to 9 credit hours if the topic changes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ( ART 2201 and ART 2202 ) or ART 2210


ART 3215 - History & Concepts of Drawing
Credits: 3.00
Lecture-based art history course on selected topics in media and methods in art. May have focus on Drawing, Sculpture, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, or other distinctive area. The course will include investigation of the conceptual and the applied in specific topic area.. May be repeated up to 9 credit hours if the topic changes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3220 - Art of the Ancient World
Credits: 3.00
Lecture-based course on selected topics in the art of Ancient Egypt, Ancient Near East, Greece or Rome, studying artworks from within or across these cultures in their cultural and historical contexts.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3230 - Med Art Chrs Europe/Near East
Credits: 3.00
Lecture based course in religious and secular art in the Early Christian, Byzantine, Medieval, or Northern Renaissance periods, c. 100-1500 CE, including selected scripture, painting and architecture in historical and cultural context. May be repeated up to 9 credit hours if the topic changes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3240 - Ital Renaissance or Baroque Ar
Credits: 3.00
A lecture-based course in Italian Renaissance or Baroque art, studying artwork from the period in historical and cultural context. May be repeated up to 6 credit hours if the topic changes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3250 - 18th or 19th Century Art
Credits: 3.00
This is a lecture-based course on 18th or 19th century art which studies artwork in its historical and cultural aspects including Rococo, Neoclassical, Romantic or Realist movements. It focuses on the painting, sculpture, photography, graphic arts of the 18th or 19th century. May be repeated up to 6 credit hours if the topic changes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3260 - American Art
Credits: 3.00
Lecture-based course in American art, studying artwork in its historical and cultural context.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3270 - Pre-World War II Modernism
Credits: 3.00
Lecture-based course on the art and architecture of the pre-World War II period, exploring the concepts and formal characteristics of 'modernism' in Western art.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3275 - Art Since 1945
Credits: 3.00
Lecture-based course on art movements from 1945 to the present.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3280 - Museum Seminar
Credits: 3.00 to 4.00
This course involves classroom study of the art collections and architecture of a city or country followed by a trip to visit what has been studied. The subject varies: American cities or abroad. Credit will vary by trip. Students enrolling in the summer Bayeux program will take 4 hours; others take 3 hours credit. May be repeated up to 16 hours credit.
Lecture: 3.00 to 4.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3301 - Beginning Ceramics
Credits: 3.00
This is a creative problem solving fine art studio course designed to serve as an introduction to the historical precedents, theories, processes and materials utilized in the realization and production of Contemporary Ceramic art. Emphasis will be placed on developing a variety of hand-building techniques and attaining a basic understanding of claybody composition and properties. Also included will be an introduction to slips, glazes, and firing techniques. In addition, this class will focus on developing content, and learning about artists (both ceramic artists and artists working in other media) of both past and present. We will consider Ceramics in a variety of contexts such as: Ceramics, Communication, Commentary, Commodity, Celebration and Critique.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ( ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1101 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1102 Minimum Grade: C ) and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3302 - Int Cer:Molds, Mul & Mec Means
Credits: 3.00
This is an intermediate course that provides students the opportunity to expand their technical skills, experience and critical thinking skills through the completion of a series of process specific projects. Each project requires research, an oral presentation and the production of personally derived artwork that utilizes the given process/technical information and reflects the assigned research.
Lecture: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3301 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3400 - Graphic Des Surv for Non-Major
Credits: 3.00
Graphic Design Survey for Non-Majors is a studio class teaching the basic principles and terminology of graphic design and typography, with an emphasis on the design process. Students will be able to apply these concepts and creative processes to visually communicate their ideas in a more effective way. Open to ALL UWG students. Art majors: course can count as Departmental Elective. ART 3400 will not count as a Graphic Design Concentration elective or substitute for any other concentration requirements.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 3401 - Graphic Design I
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to communication design with a strong emphasis on sound design and typographic principles, developing an understanding of structure, history, technology and application.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ( ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1101 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1102 Minimum Grade: C ) and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3402 - Graphic Design II
Credits: 3.00
Students integrate knowledge of typography with visual form and meaning. Design methodology and research are emphasized.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3401 Minimum Grade: B


ART 3403 - History of Graphic Design
Credits: 3.00
This course provides art majors the opportunity to explore the historic perspectives, cultural relevance and technical aspects of graphic and design issues within the context of the contemporary profession of design. Study of historic print production processes will include printmaking and photography. Pre-requisites: ART 1006, 1007, 2201, Permission of Instructor. $75.00 lab fee request.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 1006 and ART 1007 and ART 2201


ART 3601 - Painting I: Watercolor
Credits: 3.00
This is one of two introductory painting courses, either of which fulfills the Art Core Painting requirement for Art majors and building on the knowledge base of the Art Foundation courses. This course uses watercolor as a vehicle for visual expression. Open-ended painting problems from both nature and the imagination will be presented. Students will mat and frame a selection of art works produced during the term.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ( ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1101 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1102 Minimum Grade: C ) and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3602 - Painting II
Credits: 3.00
A painting course using oil, acrylic and/or other opaque media as a vehicle for continued progress in visual expression. Students will frame a selection of artwork produced during the term.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ( ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1101 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1102 Minimum Grade: C ) and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3605 - Painting III: Painting Figure
Credits: 3.00
This is an intensive investigation into many modes of painting and representation centering around human and animal forms, including anatomical studies, illustration, metaphorical and abstract painting, depictions of figure in exterior and interior space, and multiple figures interacting in the picture plane. Students will practice gesture drawing in each class, large scale painting, extended poses, foreshortening, and keep a sketchbook. Students will explore the content of the class with various types of paint, including watercolor, oil, and mixed media as well as drawing, using traditional and contemporary approaches.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3601 Minimum Grade: C or ART 3602 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3700 - Survey of Photography
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to introduce students to a comprehensive investigation of the history of photography through study and production. Situated as an integral part of communication, photography is a medium that fundamentally impacts our daily lives and culture. This course explores the technical innovations, cultural implications, and the major figures in photography’s history. Students will learn the subject by working hands-on with historic photographic darkroom processes as well as learn about the subject through lectures, readings and exams.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ( ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1101 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1102 Minimum Grade: C ) and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3701 - Intro to Photography
Credits: 3.00
This course explores the use of digital - SLR (single lens reflex) cameras. Studio practice emphasizes digital workflow and print production. Assignments are usually weekly and present a cumulative set of strategies for constructing images. Course also provides an introduction to the history and the many cultural implications of the medium. Emphasis is placed on sophisticated seeing and image making within the camera rather than digital manipulation.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ( ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1101 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1102 Minimum Grade: C ) and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3702 - Darkroom Photography
Credits: 3.00
This course covers the use of analogue 35mm film cameras, traditional darkroom methods of image-making and analogue/digital hybrid processes. Conventional genres of image making such as still life, portraiture, and landscape are used as a means to explore contemporary issues. The course stresses continued development of a personal visual vocabulary and understanding of historical and cultural implications.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3701 Minimum Grade: C or ART 3100 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3703 - Digital Imaging
Credits: 3.00
This course explores digital manipulation of imagery as a post-production process. Exercises explore various strategies for reconfiguring imagery and what the reconfiguring does to the meaning of imagery. Selected readings and discussions aid in the discussion/understanding on/of these topics. The course also stresses continued development of personal visual vocabulary and understanding of historical and cultural implications.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3701 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3704 - Intro to Time-Based Art
Credits: 3.00
This course introduces the basic principles of current digital video and audio technology as a means of making time-based art. Traditional production techniques in cinematography, audio recording, non-linear editing, and lighting are taught. Students learn to work within a number of different genres including, documentary, narrative, experimental, and cross-genres. Weekly screenings of films and videos, assigned readings, and accompanying discussions will serve as a means to broaden students? critical and theoretical understanding of the mediums. Can be taken instead of ART 3702 (Photo II)
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3701 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3705 - Artificial Lighting
Credits: 3.00
This course provides students with an introduction to artificial lighting for photography and video. Students will learn the fundamentals of artificial lighting and its application through demonstrations, weekly assignments, and readings. Students will complete a series of assignments in and outside of the photography studio using lighting techniques to achieve conceptual and aesthetic goals.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3701 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3801 - Printmaking I: Survey
Credits: 3.00
A survey of the basic printmaking methods associated with relief and intaglio printmaking, including an introduction to book forms.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ( ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1101 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1102 Minimum Grade: C ) and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3802 - Relief Printmaking
Credits: 3.00
Printmaking II will offer advanced experiences in relief printmaking including the introduction of color. In addition, students will develop image with text through a brief historical survey of letterpress printing.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3801 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3901 - Introductory Sculpture
Credits: 3.00
An introduction into the four sculptural processes:Subtractive Method (carving); Additive Method (modeling);Substitutive Method (casting); and, Constructive Method (assembling). Emphasis is made on preliminary designing of mass, space and volume.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ( ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1101 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1102 Minimum Grade: C ) and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3902 - Sculpture II
Credits: 3.00
Emphasis on this course is on acquiring technical skills and learning the safe and appropriate use of tools and materials in the fabrication of sculptural objects. Course also addresses the impact of material and technique upon form and content with the use of mass, space and volume.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3901 Minimum Grade: C


ART 3903 - Sculpture III
Credits: 3.00
Emphasis of this course is on acquiring technical skill and learning the safe and appropriate use of tools and an expanded view of traditional and nontraditional materials in the fabrication of sculptural objects. Students will expand individual visual, vocabulary, technique, media and concepts through research, design and construction.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3901 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4000 - Advanced Drawing
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Advanced visual art production and personal expression in drawing. May be repeated up to 15 credit hours.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ( ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1101 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1102 Minimum Grade: C ) and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4005 - Advanced Life Drawing
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Drawing of the live model, both nude and clothed, continuing the mastery of both proportions and anatomy. A variety of drawing media will be used. May be repeated up to 15 credit hours.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ( ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1101 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C or ART 1102 Minimum Grade: C ) and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4007 - Digital Media For Artist
Credits: 3.00
This course is an introduction to Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Dreamweaver and Adobe Flash for all art majors. Students will create an online portfolio of their work with an emphasis on personal promotion and professionalism. Lessons will focus on bitmap and vector based imaging and the aesthetics of web design. Additional topics will include how to effectively work with color, text, font layout and other means of digital imaging.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3301 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3601 Minimum Grade: C or ART 3602 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3701 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3801 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3901 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4009 - Art Curricul & Classrm Mngmnt
Credits: 3.00
This class is designed for the art education major to apply educational principles of curriculum design and a variety of instructional strategies to the content of art education with an emphasis on classroom management. Methods in art education include approaches to art pedagogy, production, criticism, and aesthetics utilizing a variety of age-appropriate studio media. An internship in a prekindergarten and elementary level art class is a requirement of this course.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE and ART 3011 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3012 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4010 - Secondary Art Methods
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed for the art education major to focus on the developmental needs and abilities of students at the middle and secondary level as well as techniques for technology enhanced instruction. Methods in art education include approaches to art pedagogy, production, criticism, and aesthetics utilizing a variety of age-appropriate studio media. An internship in a high school and middle level art class is a requirement of this course.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE and ART 3011 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3012 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4011 - Student Teaching in Art Educ
Credits: 3.00
Student teaching is the cumulating course of the teacher preparation program. It is typically viewed as a full class load and done primarily in a selected school under the guidance of an experienced supervising art teacher and the university supervisor. In art education students will complete a portion of the student teaching experience at the elementary level and another portion at the secondary level in order to receive vertical K-12 certification. Periodic seminars will be held on campus for students to meet as a group for discussion and instruction. 'C' or better required for certification.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: Educ.Field Experience Appl FE and Teacher Education Admission TE


ART 4012 - Student Teach in Art Education
Credits: 3.00
Student teaching is the cumulating course of the teacher preparation program. It is typically viewed as a full class load and done primarily in a selected school under the guidance of an experienced supervising art teacher and the university supervisor. In art education students will complete a portion of the student teaching experience at the elementary level and another portion at the secondary level in order to receive vertical K-12 certification. Periodic seminars will be held on campus for students to meet as a group for discussion and instruction. 'C' or better required for certification.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: Educ.Field Experience Appl FE and Teacher Education Admission TE


ART 4013 - Student Teach in Art Education
Credits: 3.00
Student teaching is the cumulating course of the teacher preparation program. It is typically viewed as a full class load and done primarily in a selected school under the guidance of an experienced supervising art teacher and the university supervisor. In art education students will complete a portion of the student teaching experience at the elementary level and another portion at the secondary level in order to receive vertical K-12 certification. Periodic seminars will be held on campus for students to meet as a group for discussion and instruction. 'C' or better required for certification.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: Educ.Field Experience Appl FE and Teacher Education Admission TE


ART 4078 - Mid-Program Review
Credits: .00
All BA and BFA candidates must enroll and successfully complete ART 4078. (See department website for specific requirements for ART 4078). Art faculty will review juniors based on their portfolio, writings, presentation and transcript progress. Candidates will be assessed on the level of knowledge and skill base gain to date. Successful candidates will be allowed to enroll into their respective capstone courses (ART 4298 or ART 4998). Course May be repeated up to two additional times. Unsuccessful review on the third attempt may result in candidates being placed on probation or removed from their degree program. ART 4078 must be taken during a semester when the student is enrolled in 12 credit hours.
Lecture: .00 Lab: .00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 4212 - History of Interiors
Credits: 3.00
A survey of architecture and furniture styles from Ancient time to the present, but with an emphasis on contemporary design.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 4290 - Modernist Criticism
Credits: 3.00
A discussion-based seminar based on intellectual and theoretical debates about modern and contemporary art, focusing on the concept of the avant-garde and the practice of art criticism. Readings are informed by theoretical developments such as psychoanalysis, semiotics, Marxist Art History, gender and race studies, post structuralism and visual culture debates.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4295 - Special Topics in Art History
Credits: 3.00
Investigation of a particular topic, problem or issue in Art History with emphasis on those not covered in other art history courses.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C or ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4298 - Senior Capstone in Art History
Credits: 1.00
The first of a two-semester capstone sequence for Art History majors. In consultation with a committee, the student will finalize a thesis topic and complete research for a final project, to be completed and presented in ART 4299.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 4299 - Sr Capstone in Art History 2
Credits: 2.00
The second of a two-semester capstone sequence for art history majors. In this semester, the student will finalize the written research paper and present it to the department, and pass oral examination by the faculty.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 4298 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4302 - Inter Ceramics:20th Cent Studi
Credits: 3.00
This course expands the development of ceramic techniques aesthetics specific to the 20th century art movements: Futurism, Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, Pop/Funk, and Photorealism. Students will progress through each movement with assigned research and technical instruction that will foster an understanding of the role of Ceramics in each of these 'Fine Art' movements. Ceramic Tromp l'oeil techniques will be employed during the completion of a series of period influenced projects. At this level students learn a variety of kiln firing methods and kiln maintenance. Students are responsible for the firing of their own work. Additional emphasis will be placed on studio maintenance and operations. Students will also continue to extend their ceramic/art history and theory research to fuel the development of content in their own artwork.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3301 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4303 - Int Ceramics:Surf, Image &Text
Credits: 3.00
Intermediate Ceramics - Surface, Image and Text is a process premised intermediate course that provides students the opportunity to expand their technical skills, experience and critical thinking skills through the completion of a series or process specific projects. Each project requires research, an oral presentation and the production of personally derived artwork that utilizes the given process/technical information and reflects the assigned research.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3301 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4304 - Advanced Ceramics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Emphasis on individual expression with clay and ceramic glaze calculation. May be repeated up to 15 credit hours.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3302 Minimum Grade: C and ART 4302 Minimum Grade: C and ART 4303 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4400 - Graphic Design Studio Problems
Credits: 3.00
This is a professional preparatory class in which students in the class operate as a design team that interacts directly with a variety of selected clients, with faculty supervision, to realize professional projects. The course will be a combination of discussion, lecture, client meetings, studio and production time, with client project assignments throughout the semester. This course fulfills the same requirement as ART 4403 or 4404 for all graphic design majors, but not both.
Lecture: 1.50 Lab: 1.50
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3402


ART 4403 - Graphic Design III
Credits: 3.00
Design problems are studied holistically through assignments that stress dynamic relationships inherent in context, form and content to gain a deeper understanding of the development of design systems and concepts.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3401 Minimum Grade: B and ART 3402 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4404 - Graphic Design IV
Credits: 3.00
Design studio problems that explore a variety of approaches to data systems, strategies, and applications. Research, conceptual development and presentation are emphasized.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3402 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4405 - Graphic Design V
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
An expansion of research into the structure, history, technology and application of sound graphic and typographic principles. Research, conceptual development and presentation are emphasized. May be repeated for up to (9) hours. Repeated courses may meet graphic design elective requirements.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 4404


ART 4406 - Graphic Design VI
Credits: 3.00
Conceptual development and realization of an approved senior-level thesis project culminating in a Senior Exit Show. Research and presentation strategies are emphasized. May be repeated for up to (9) hours. Repeated courses may count towards the Graphic Design elective requirement.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 4404


ART 4408 - Mat & Methods in Graph Design
Credits: 3.00
This is an advanced typography course dedicated to exploring unconventional forms of typographic expression through rigorous and thoughtful experimentation. Both digital and analog methodologies will be explored. Course is repeatable for up to 12 hours. ART 4408 Materials & Methods in Graphic Design requires Permission of Instructor Only in addition to the completion of the following courses with a minimum grade of C: ART 1006, 1007, 1008, 1009, 2201, and 2202.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 1006 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1007 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1008 Minimum Grade: C and ART 1009 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2201 Minimum Grade: C and ART 2202 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4586 - Internship
Credits: 1.00 to 9.00
Students will secure a position with a company for field experience. Academic component includes written reports and/or visual presentations. Permission of the department is required. May be repeated up to 15 Credit hours; however, no more than 9 credit hours in a given semester.
Lab: 1.00 to 9.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 4603 - Painting III
Credits: 3.00
This course covers the techniques and materials of Acrylic painting and related paint products. It's conceptual emphasis will be the creative problem solving of specific compositional and formal issues in painting and will primarily reference issues of abstraction in modern and contemporary art, as well as non-western painting and design and craft models. Process, and creative and critical thinking methodology-technical, aesthetic and conceptual -is emphasized through the keeping of note/sketchbook journals. Oral presentations of supporting research and the creative work strengthen the understanding of the role of critical awareness of the subject. or 3602 with minimum grades of C.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3601 Minimum Grade: C or ART 3602 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4604 - Acrylic & Experimental Process
Credits: 3.00
An intermediate level painting course exploring visual expression through the use of combined media and art forms, and developing their ability to engage with critical concepts of specific concern to the discipline of painting. Studio discipline and research leading to resolved works will prepare students for self-directed work in advanced painting classes. Oral and written presentations of supporting research and the creative work strengthen the student's understanding of the role of critical awareness of their subject.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3602 Minimum Grade: C or ART 3601 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4605 - Advanced Painting
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
An advanced level course exploring visual expression in painting using the media of the student's choice. Open-ended problems will be presented. Self-directed work with special focus on developing a cohesive work of work that reflects the student's investigation of their role and definition of being an artist. Emphasis will be placed on increased professionalism appropriate to the student's stage in the program and with a view to their potential success as a professional artist. This course is repeatable for up to 15 credit hours.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3601 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3602 Minimum Grade: C and ART 4603 Minimum Grade: C and ART 4604 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4702 - From Still to Moving Images
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to provide advanced students with an in-depth investigation of the relationship between still and moving images. Students will create photographic prints and video work as well as other works that don?t fall easily into either category. An emphasis will be put on understanding the historic evolution of still and moving images and the use of lens-based imagery in contemporary art. Weekly film screenings will accompany critical readings.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3703 Minimum Grade: C and ( ART 3702 Minimum Grade: C or ART 3704 Minimum Grade: C )


ART 4704 - Documentary Photography
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to give advanced students and in-depth experience studying and creating documentary images. Documentary projects are expensive investigations of a subject. Students will define a project with the assistance of the instructor and continue to investigate this project for the entire semester. Progress will be assessed through bi-monthly critiques and monthly submission of images. Whereas concept based art is meant to reflect the personal feelings of the artist and commercial photography is meant to convey ideas for a client, documentary is meant to reflect outwards on society. Projects should have some socio-political or cultural significance. Students will also learn about the history and major figures in documentary photography through slide lectures and readings.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3701 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3702 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3703 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3704 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4706 - Advanced Photography Studio
Credits: 3.00
Contingent on the approval of the instructor, the student will define a series of works delving into specific subject matter and/or technical interests. This course is meant to further the direction of the individual and prepare them for their senior exhibitions. May be repeated up to 15 credit hours.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3701 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3702 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3703 Minimum Grade: C and ART 4704 Minimum Grade: C and ART 4705 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4708 - Exp Prac in Lens-Based Media
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to introduce advanced students to experimental, non-traditional, and alternative photographic and motion picture processes. Students will produce photographic series, time-based works, and other forms of art such as installations, 3-D objects, and projections. Projects will utilize an array of analogue and digital technologies in their production.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 4703 Minimum Grade: C or ART 4704 Minimum Grade: C or ART 4705 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4803 - Intaglio
Credits: 3.00
Printmaking III will offer advanced experiences in the intaglio method of printmaking including hard and soft ground etching, aquatint, spit bite and monoprinting. Color etching will be introduced, and exposure to book forms will continue.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3801 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4804 - Lithography
Credits: 3.00
Printmaking IV offers an introduction to the history and processes of aluminum plate and stone lithography, and continued exposure to the book as an art form.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3801 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4805 - Advanced Printmaking
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Advanced expressive problems at the undergraduate level in one or more of the following methods: relief, intaglio, or lithography. May be repeated up to 15 credit hours.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3801 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3802 Minimum Grade: C and ART 4803 Minimum Grade: C and ART 4804 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4821 - Printmaking IV: Screenprinting
Credits: 3.00
Screenprinting is a versatile printmaking medium in which students can combine a variety of marks, including photographic, digital and autographic into images which can be printed on many surfaces (paper, canvas and other fabric, wood, plastic, glass, etc.) This course is an investigation into the techniques and conceptual possibilities of water-based screenprinting (serigraphy) with emphasis on an interdisciplinary approach.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3801 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4822 - The Art of Letrprs Print & Bk
Credits: 3.00
Letterpress and Printing and Book Arts will continue with advanced problems where Printmaking Survey (3801) ended. The utilization of moveable type (typesetting) will compare aesthetics, history and vocabulary with those of current computer based typesetting. Letterpress will explore fine letterpress printing and expressive typography while learning to operate the Vandercook SP20 Test Press. A variety of two and three dimensional formats will be considered for letterpress application, with an emphasis on the role of the book from its inception to current trends in the book arts.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3801 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4903 - Sculpture IV
Credits: 3.00
Focus of this course is on individual visual vocabulary, expression and content through production of meaningful objects. Students will research and apply advanced techniques and issues in contemporary sculpture using a wide range of traditional and nontraditional materials.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3901 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4904 - Advanced Sculpture
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
This course focuses on advanced sculptural investigations and individual expression with traditional and nontraditional materials chosen by the student. Students demonstrate significant research in process, technique and materials to express individual ideas and aesthetics resulting in a portfolio of works. May be repeated up to 15 credit hours.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3901 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3902 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3903 Minimum Grade: C and ART 4903 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4985 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Individual studio problems in various topics or media relevant to the student's special interest and competence. May be repeated up to 15 credit hours.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 3301 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3601 Minimum Grade: C or ART 3602 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3701 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3801 Minimum Grade: C and ART 3901 Minimum Grade: C


ART 4998 - Sr Capstone Experience I
Credits: 1.00
Research and study within a studio concentration tha tculminates in the public presentation of the senior exhibition (ART 4899: Senior Capstone II). Students will be required to research this project and document its development prior to the presentation of the written capstone component. With the aid of their peers, advisors and faculty jurors' students will work through the articulation of their goals by active critiquing and self-assessment.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 4999 - Senior Capstone Exp II
Credits: 2.00
Continued research and advanced study within a studio/design concentration will culminate in the public presentation of the senior exhibition. Capstone Experience II will provide an opportunity to consolidate, expand and refine the skills that are essential to your discipline. The preparation of an oral defense for this final body of work, their creative thesis visual project, will undergo the critical review of an Art Faculty Committee prior to its public presentation in the Senior Fine Arts Exhibition. Additionally, the completion of the written component of the creative visual project, begun in ART 49XX, Capstone Experience I, will describe in full the processes and the outcomes of the senior research.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art
Pre-requisites: ART 4998 Minimum Grade: C


ART 5000 - Graduate Drawing
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Personal expression through drawing with an emphasis on uniqueness or a personal vision.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5005 - Graduate Life Drawing
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Advanced, expressive drawing problems at the graduate level, dealing with the proportion and anatomy of the human figure. Nude models will be used.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5200 - The Art of Greece and Rome
Credits: 3.00
The study of Greek, Etruscan, and Roman sculpture, architecture, and painting in their historical context.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5201 - History of Non-Western Art
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the art and architecture of Asia, Africa, Oceania and pre-Columbian America. These will be explored as evidence of various cultures as they evolve in specific times and places with reference to use in relationship to ritual and beliefs of those who create these expressions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5202 - Earl Christ,Byzant & Medvl Art
Credits: 3.00
An in-depth study of the artistic expression of Christian Europe during the period c. 100-1400 CE, including selected secular works from this region.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5204 - Art of the Renaissance
Credits: 3.00
A study of Northern and Italian Renaissance painting, sculpture, and architecture in their historical context.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5206 - Art of 17th&18th C in Eur & Am
Credits: 3.00
Art and Architecture of Europe and America from 1600-1800, covering the Baroque, Rococo, Early neoclassical, Romantic and Colonial American periods.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5207 - Art of the 19th Century
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on the painting, sculpture, photography, and graphic arts of the nineteenth century.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5208 - Art of 20th & 21st Centuries
Credits: 3.00
An exploration of the concepts and formal characteristics of 'modernism' in Western Art, as well as the various '-isms' that are frequently associated with the modern and post-modern movements. Production, reception, marketing, interpretation and criticism of painting, sculpture, drawing, photography, installations, performance, video and other mixed media modes of presentation. International in scope.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5210 - American Art
Credits: 3.00
The study of American paintings, sculpture, architecture, and emerging art forms in their historical context.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5220 - Museum Seminar
Credits: 3.00 to 4.00
This course involves classroom study of the art and architecture of a city or country followed by a trip to visit what has been studied. The subject varies: New York City, Chicago, Washington/Philadelphia, Italy, France, Greece, Vienna/Paris.
Lecture: 3.00 to 4.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5285 - Special Topics in Art History
Credits: 3.00
Survey and investigation of a particular topic, problem, or issue in art history with emphasis on those covered in other art history courses.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5305 - Graduate Ceramics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Advanced visual expressive problems in ceramics at the graduate level, including writing about ceramics.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5405 - Graduate Graphic Design
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Graduate-level studies in Graphic Design with an emphasis upon the concepts and appropriate production methodologies. Studio work will be computer based and relative to professional growth.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5605 - Graduate Painting
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Advanced visual expression at the graduate level in painting using transparent, opaque or mixed media.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5705 - Graduate Photography
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Advanced visual interpretative problems in photography at the graduate level.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5805 - Graduate Printmaking
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Advanced expressive problems at the graduate level, in one or more of the following methods: relief, intaglio or lithography.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5825 - Graduate Papermaking/Book Arts
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Traditional and contemporary methods of papermaking and book arts as an art form.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5905 - Graduate Sculpture
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Advanced sculptural investigations in at least two of the sculpture processes: carving, modeling, casting, or assembling. Emphasis on experimentations with innovative techniques, materials and personal themes.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 5985 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Individual studio problems at the graduate level in various topics or media relevant to the student's special interest and competence.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 6086 - Graduate Internship
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Students will secure a position with a company for field experience. Academic component includes written reports and/or visual presentations. Permission of the department is required.
Lab: 3.00 to 9.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 6110 - Art Education Curriculum
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to review and extend the art educator's foundation of curricular theory, investigation of current educational research in instruction and assessment with applicability to the field art education will be a primary focus. Innovative teaching strategies, including cross-discipline approaches or the use of technology, may be explored.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 6111 - Art Critic, Aesthet, Contp Iss
Credits: 3.00
This course will focus on art criticism and aesthetics as disciplines within the field of art education. Students will develop strategies for utilizing art criticism in a DBAE curriculum. Students will also develop an understanding of aesthetics as philosophy and develop approaches to philosophical inquire in art education.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 6150 - Art Education Prospectus
Credits: 1.00
A preliminary review of literature in art education in an area of interest will be conducted in order for the student to identify a topic and methodology for continued research. A research proposal will be written and a committee established to guide the research project or thesis.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 6184 - Art Education Research Seminar
Credits: 1.00
With the guidance of the art advisor and a faculty committee, the student will research an area of art education. The student has the option to present their research in a thesis or project format. Both options require a written component as specified by the Graduate School and Department of Art to document the investigation conducted and the relevance of the findings to the field of art education.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art


ART 6199 - Art Educ Thesis/Research Proj
Credits: 1.00
The course will be the cumulating experience for the Masters Degree in Art Education. The thesis or research project will be completed to the satisfaction of the student's committee. Both options require a written component as specified by the Graduate School and Department of Art to document the research conducted and the implications of the findings to the field of art education.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art



Visual and Performing Arts

Visual and Performing Arts


ARTS 1100 - Art Appreciation
Credits: 3.00
Arts 1100 is a 3 semester-credit-hour course focused on fostering an awareness, understanding, and appreciation for the visual arts. Through exposure to cross-cultural art images throughout history, students will build a global artistic vocabulary that allows for the constructive analysis of art objects. Students will also gain an understanding of the influence of art on other important aspects of culture including politics, history, religion, and science.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Art



Astronomy

Astronomy


ASTR 2313 - Astronomy
Credits: 3.00
A survey of sky awareness, historical developments of astronomy, the solar system, stars, nebulas, and galaxies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Physics


ASTR 2313L - Astronomy Laboratory
Credits: 1.00
An experimental introduction to the elementary tools of astronomy.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Physics


ASTR 3033 - Topics in Astronomy
Credits: 3.00
Topics about the solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. May not be taken by students who have completed ASTR 2313 and does not count toward a major in physics, except for Plan D.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Physics


ASTR 5555 - Teaching the Solar System
Credits: 3.00
Course offered in partnership with Columbus State University as part of the GOML/MATC program. A study of our Earth and Solar System to provide a framework for teachers to introduce or enhance a performance-based space science curriculum in 6-12 education. Students will also develop an understanding of the history, methods, and physics of solar system astronomy. Topics include motions of the sky, seasons, planetary geology and atmospheres, moons, asteriods, and comets, the Sun, the Sun-Earth connection, and the search for extrasolar planets. This online section will also include introduction to numerous online resources and engagement with NASA data and data processing software.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership & Instruction



Biology

Biology


BIOL 1010 - Fundamentals of Biology
Credits: 3.00
An introduction in basic biological phenomena. Emphasis will be placed on humans and processes within the human biology. Topics include: biological molecules, cells, organ systems, genetics, biological diversity, and the interaction of man with his environment.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 1010L - Fundamentals of Biology Lab
Credits: 1.00
Laboratory component of BIOL 1010.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 1011K - Introductory Biology w/lab
Credits: 4.00
An introduction to fundamental unifying principles in biology. Topics covered in the course include: chemistry of life, cell structure and membranes, cellular functions (metabolism, respiration, photosynthesis, communication, and reproduction), genetics (inheritance patterns, DNA structure and function, gene expression, and biotechnology), and evolution. This course involves both lecture and lab components.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: eCore Introduction Quiz C


BIOL 1012 - Ecology & Environmental Biol
Credits: 3.00
Ecology and Environmental Biology is designed to familiarize non-major students with the basic structures and functions of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Based on this foundation, emphasis will be placed on ecological assessments of many current and pressing environmental issues that threaten the air, water and soil resources of earth.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 1012K - Introduction to Biology II
CEUs: 4.00
This course covers the evolution and diversity of organisms, including microbes, protists, fungi, plants, and animals. Additional topics include body systems, the immune system, reproduction and development, and ecology. For non-biology majors only.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 1.00
College: eCampus


BIOL 1013 - Biol of AIDS & Infect Disease
Credits: 3.00
The Biology of AIDS and Infectious Disease is designed to inform students about infectious diseases, how microorganisms cause diseases and how humans resist and fight infection. It will introduce students to several human organ systems and the common infections for those systems. The course will particularly focus on AIDS and HIV, the history, epidemiology, biology, diagnosis, and treatment of this particular disease.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 1014 - Nutrition
Credits: 3.00
A course designed to introduce students to the science of nutrition and how it impacts their lives.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 1015 - The Unseen World of Microbes
Credits: 3.00
Designed to introduce non-science majors to the diversity and importance of microorganisms and the role of these organisms play in the environment, industry, and out health.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 1016 - Biology of Human Reproduction
Credits: 3.00
The Biology of Human Reproduction is designed to familiarize students with the basic structure and function of the reproductive tract, developmental biology, the genetics of reproduction and disease and dysfunctions of the reproductive tract. Topics of general interest such as birth control, sexually transmitted diseases, infertility and means of overcoming infertility will be discussed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 1107 - Principles of Biology I
Credits: 3.00
This course is the first of a two-part sequence for nursing and non-biology science majors. Topics include biomolecules, cell structure and function, energy metabolism, photosynthesis, cell reproduction, and genetics.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Co-requisites: BIOL 1107L


BIOL 1107L - Principles of Biology I Lab
Credits: 1.00
The laboratory component for BIOL 1107. Lecture and lab must be taken in the same term.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Co-requisites: BIOL 1107


BIOL 1108 - Principles of Biology II
Credits: 3.00
This course is the second of a two-part sequence for nursing and non-biology science majors. Topics include evolution, plant and animal physiology, and ecology.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Co-requisites: BIOL 1108L


BIOL 1108L - Principles of Biology II Lab
Credits: 1.00
The laboratory component for BIOL 1108.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Co-requisites: BIOL 1108


BIOL 1110 - Biological Diversity
Credits: 3.00
This course is an Introductory foundation-building course for Biology majors. It is designed to familiarize students with the distinguishing characteristics, taxonomy, evolutionary relationships, and economic importance of all domains of life. For Biology majors only. Does not fulfill core requirements.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 2021 - Human Anatomy & Physiology I
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the structural and functional relationships in the human body. This course will introduce the student to the background material and the organ systems associated with protection, support, and movement, as well as, the systems which control and integrate body functions. This course is designed to be taken prior to BIOL 2022. This course is not intended for biology or other laboratory science majors and cannot be used for credit toward those degrees.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: ( ( BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: B and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: B ) or ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: B and CHEM 1212L Minimum Grade: B ) or ( CHEM 1152K Minimum Grade: B ) or ( PHYS 1112 Minimum Grade: B and PHYS 1112L Minimum Grade: B ) ) and BIOL 2021L


BIOL 2021L - Human Anatomy & Physiol I Lab
Credits: 1.00
The laboratory component of BIOL 2021. Students must enroll in BIOL 2021 in the same term.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: BIOL 2021


BIOL 2022 - Human Anatomy & Physiology II
Credits: 3.00
A continuation of BIOL 2021. This course will introduce the student to the structure and function of the organ systems associated with blood production, blood flow, respiration, digestion, excretion, reproduction and immunity. This course is not intended for biology or other laboratory science majors and cannot be used for credit toward those degrees.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: BIOL 2021 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2021L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2022L


BIOL 2022L - Human Anat & Physiol II Lab
Credits: 1.00
The laboratory component of BIOL 2022.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: BIOL 2021 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2021L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2022


BIOL 2030 - Medical Microbiology
Credits: 3.00
Medical microbiology is a course designed for nursing and other allied health persons and is intended to introduce the student to the basic concepts and practices of microbiology, especially with regard to health and human disease. Lecture portions of the course will address the basic biology of microorganisms, pathogenic mechanisms, host defense and immunity, and microorganisms and human diseases. This course is not intended for biology or other laboratory science majors and cannot be used for credit toward those degrees.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: ( ( ( CHEM 1151 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1151L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( CHEM 1151K Minimum Grade: C ) ) and ( CHEM 1152 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1152L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( CHEM 1152K Minimum Grade: C ) ) or ( ( ( CHEM 1211 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1211L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( CHEM 1211K Minimum Grade: C ) ) and ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1212L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( CHEM 1212K Minimum Grade: C ) ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) and BIOL 2030L


BIOL 2030L - Medical Microbiology Lab
Credits: 1.00
The laboratory component of BIOL 2030.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: BIOL 2030


BIOL 2107 - Prin of Biology I for Bio Majr
Credits: 3.00
This is the first of a two semester course designed for biology majors requiring a survey of fundamental topics in modern biology. Lectures build on a foundation of chemistry to develop current concepts of cell and molecular biology, genetics, evolution, and biological diversity. This course satisfies a core requirement of the Biology Major, but does not fulfill any of the requirements for general education.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: ( CHEM 1211K or CHEM 1211 ) and ( CHEM 1212K or CHEM 1212 ) and BIOL 2107L


BIOL 2107L - Prin of Biol I Lab for Bio Maj
Credits: 1.00
This is the laboratory component for the lecture course, BIOL 2017.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: ( CHEM 1212K or CHEM 1212L ) and BIOL 2107


BIOL 2108 - Prin of Bio II for Biol Majors
Credits: 3.00
This is the second of a two semester course designed for biology majors requiring a survey of fundamental topics in modern biology. Lectures build on a foundation of chemistry to develop current concepts of the form and function of plants and animals and of ecology. This course satisfies a core requirement of the Biology major but does not fulfill any of the requirements for general education.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: ( CHEM 1211K or CHEM 1211 ) and ( CHEM 1212K or CHEM 1212 ) and BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1110 and BIOL 2108L


BIOL 2108L - Prin of Bio II Lab for Bio Maj
Credits: 1.00
This is the laboratory component for the lecture course, BIOL 2108.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: BIOL 2108


BIOL 2983 - Undergraduate Biology Research
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
A course designed to allow students to conduct faculty-directed, independent research projects in areas of the biological sciences. The course may be repeated, but credit for BIOL 2983 may not apply toward biology degree requirements.
Lab: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 2985 - Special Topics in Biology
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
This course will cover various topics in biology at the lower division level. The topics will change from term to term. Courses may or may not involve laboratory instruction. Non-laboratory courses will offer 3 credit hours and laboratory courses will offer 4 credit hours.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 3134 - Cell and Molecular Biology
Credits: 4.00
This course deals with the molecular aspects of cell structure and function,, emphasizing the chemical and molecular basis of cellular physiology. It also addresses genetic functions at the chromosomal and molecular levels, gene expression, and regulation.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 1107 or BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1107L or BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108 or BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108L or BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) and CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) and CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L )


BIOL 3135 - Ecology
Credits: 4.00
This course is designed to familiarize Biology majors with the factors controlling the structure and function of populations, communities, and ecosystems. The role of evolutionary processes in the structure and function of these systems will also be explored. Basic concepts will be synthesized and reinforced by investigating the dynamics of the aquatic life zones and terrestrial biomes on earth.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 1107 or BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1107L or BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108 or BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108L or BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) and CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) and CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L )


BIOL 3221 - Taxonomy Flowerng Plants/Ferns
Credits: 4.00
Taxonomy of flowering plants and ferns is designed to familiarize students with the important botanical features and methods used to identify vascular plant species. Emphasis will be placed on recognizing the distinguishing characteristics, taxonomic relationships, and ecological distribution of plant families common to Northwest Georgia.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 3223 - Vascular Plants
Credits: 4.00
Designed to familiarize students with four basic areas of plant biology: diversity, anatomy, physiology and ecology. Ferns, fern allies, gymnosperms, and angiosperms will be compared and contrasted through lecture and lab-based exercises.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 3226 - Natural History of Vertebrates
Credits: 4.00
Vertebrate natural history is studied in lecture, lab, and field. The taxonomy, phylogeny, identification, and general aspects of the behavior and ecology of freshwater fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals of the Southeast are studied. Local species are emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 3231 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
Credits: 4.00
A lab oriented (dissection) course in the organogenesis and gross morphology of animal structure with an emphasis on functional and evolutionary modifications. Gross dissection and techniques used in morphology.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 6.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 3242 - Evolution
Credits: 4.00
The principles and mechanisms of evolution in plants and animals, covering population phenomena, specification, sexual selection, life history strategies, behavior, adaption, systematics and biogeography.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 1107 or BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1107L or BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108 or BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108L or BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) and CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) and CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L )


BIOL 3310 - Microbiology
Credits: 4.00
Microbiology is the study of biological organisms and agents too small to be seen with the unaided eye. This course will introduce students to the diversity, physiology, anatomy, and genetics of microorganisms, with particular emphasis on the bacteria. It will also introduce students to key areas of microbiology, including medical microbiology, microbial ecology, food microbiology, and biotechnology.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 1107 or BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1107L or BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108 or BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108L or BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) and CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) and CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L )


BIOL 3513 - Human Physiology
Credits: 4.00
A survey of the mechanisms involved in the function of the human body. Study is approached from the organ system level to address muscular, neural, hormonal, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, renal, and reproductive functions. Correlation will be made to the similarity between the demands placed on living systems regardless of whether the organism is multicellular or a single cell.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) and CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) and CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L )


BIOL 3526 - Vertebrate Histology
Credits: 4.00
A microanatomical study of cell and tissue structure. Emphasis is on the complex nature of tissues and how the cellular associations within the tissue contribute to the overall functions of the tissues. Laboratory is devoted to preparation and interpretation of tissue samples.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 3621 - Genetics
Credits: 4.00
The major emphasis of this course is the study of both basic and advanced genetic principles and genetic analysis methods that can be applied to all eukaryotic organisms. The secondary emphasis of this course will be the study of human medical genetics.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 1107 or BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1107L or BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108 or BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108L or BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) and CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) and CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L )


BIOL 3825 - Research Methods
Credits: 3.00
Specially designed to meet the needs of future teachers, students design and carry out four independent inquiries, which they write up and present in the manner that is common in the scientific community. Course is restricted to UTEACH students.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C


BIOL 4134 - Adv Molecular Biolgy&Bioinform
CEUs: 4.00
This is a hands-on Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics (Computational Molecular Biology) course centered on learning advanced inter-disciplinary concepts and techniques in Molecular Biology. Students will learn molecular techniques used for nucleic acid studies and proteomics. Students will learn to employ bioinformatics tools to analyze nucleotide and protein sequences using gene/protein databases, genomic portals. Additionally, students will analyze gene expression and gene co-expression patterns using RNA seq and microarray data available on public data repository. Students will work on an independent specific Molecular and Bioinformatics project outside of regular class time.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 1.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: BIOL 3434 Minimum Grade: C and ( CHEM 1211K Minimum Grade: C or ( CHEM 1211 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1211L Minimum Grade: C ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K Minimum Grade: C or ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1212L Minimum Grade: C ) )


BIOL 4241 - Entomology
Credits: 4.00
The study of insects. This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of insect taxonomy, morphology, physiology, behavior, and evolution. The relationships between insects and humans, other animals, and plants will be examined. The influences of insects on culture, religion, art, history, and colonization will be discussed. The laboratory will be devoted primarily to developing an understanding of insect identification.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 4242 - Invertebrate Zoology
Credits: 4.00
This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of taxonomy, morphology, physiology, and evolution of the more common invertebrate phyla. The distribution and interspecific relationships among invertebrates and other forms of life will be presented and discussed. The laboratory will be devoted primarily to developing an understanding of invertebrate morphology and classification.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 4245 - Ichthyology
Credits: 4.00
The biology, systematics and taxonomy of fishes with an emphasis on the biodiversity/biogeography of fishes in the state of Georgia.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 4266 - Molecular Ecology
Credits: 4.00
This course examines the use of molecular genetic data to the understanding of ecological and evolutionary processes in the natural populations such as genetic diversity, dispersal, gene flow and phylogeography. This course will also examine how molecular genetic data is utilized to study behavioral mechanism such as mate selection and foraging. Application of molecular ecology principles to conversation will also be explored.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 4315 - Bacterial Genetics
Credits: 4.00
Bacterial Genetics is an advanced microbiology course which focuses on the molecular genetics of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Topics addressed include the nature of the bacterial chromosome, the multi-step process of DNA replication, DNA damaging agents and mutations, DNA repair systems, mechanisms of gene transfer and antibiotic resistance, and the regulation of gene expression. The laboratory component reinforces concepts learned in lecture and familiarizes students with modern techniques used in genetic engineering and biotechnology.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: BIOL 3310


BIOL 4321 - Applied and Environ Microbiol
Credits: 4.00
Course is designed to expose students to the importance of micro organisms in industry and in the environment. Lab exercises focus on microbial growth, interactions with environmental factors and use in industrial applications such as treatment of sewage. Same as ENVS 4321.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 4325 - Advanced Medical Microbiology
Credits: 3.00
Advanced medical microbiology is designed to inform students of current developments in the areas of clinical and medical microbiology. The course will focus on mechanisms of pathogenesis and host defense. Discussion of new and emerging infectious agents will be addressed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: BIOL 3310


BIOL 4424 - Wildlife Habitat Ecology
Credits: 4.00
This course is designed to familiarize biology majors with the ecology and management of terrestrial wildlife habitats. Ecological concepts and principles relevant to wildlife habitat structure and function will be evaluated from the individual, population, community, ecosystem, and landscape levels of organization. Management practices that affect the structure and function of wildlife habitats will be evaluated for agricultural and forest ecosystems. Concepts will be synthesized and reinforced by investigating the habitat requirements for a variety of wildlife species in the southwestern United States.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 1107 or BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1107L or BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108 or BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108L or BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) and CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) and CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L )


BIOL 4425 - Fire Ecology
CEUs: 4.00
This is a field-based course in fire ecology concepts and techniques of the Southeast. Hands-on lessons address the use of prescribed fire to benefit ecosystems and cover safety, weather, fuel, firing techniques, and smoke management. Students will write a prescribed burn plan and participate in several burn events outside of regular class time
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 1.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 4427 - Conservation Biology
CEUs: 4.00
Conservation biology is an interdisciplinary field with the main goal of preserving biodiversity. Course topics will cover ecosystem services, major threats, solutions, and policy related to biodiversity and endangered species. Students will apply their knowledge by conducting a local conservation research project and communicating their findings.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 1.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 4440 - Aquatic Ecology
Credits: 4.00
A study of biological, chemical, and physical components and interactions in freshwater systems. Field labs include a study of reservoirs and streams in west Georgia.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 6.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 1107 or BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1107L or BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108 or BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108L or BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) and CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) and CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L )


BIOL 4441 - Animal Behavior
Credits: 4.00
This course explores the general themes and important questions in animal behavior. We will cover subjects that examine how and why animals interact with each other and their environment. Topics include: animal communication, habitat selection, foraging, predator-prey dynamics, sexual selection, mating systems, behavioral development, and learning, among others.
Lecture: 4.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 4445 - Marine Biology
Credits: 4.00
The study of the kinds and distributions of marine organisms. Particular attention is paid to biotic and abiotic features of the oceans, survey of marine habitats, organism-habitat relationships, general ecological concepts influencing marine populations and communities, and human impacts and conservation efforts.
Lecture: 4.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1211K and CHEM 1212K ) or ( BIOL 1107 and BIOL 1107L and BIOL 1108 and BIOL 1108L and CHEM 1211K and CHEM 1212K )


BIOL 4450 - Terrestrial Ecology
Credits: 4.00
This course provides an in-dept study of the processes controlling the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems. Basic concepts will be synthesized and applied comparing and contrasting the dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems in the Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and Mountain Regions of the Southeastern United States.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 6.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 or CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 4503 - Biol Perspectives:Biochemistry
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to study the interactions of biochemical pathways and the control systems that function to regulate cell and whole body metabolism. This course emphasizes the regulation of biochemical pathways as opposed to the mechanisms involved in each enzymatic step within a given pathway.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) ) and ( CHEM 2411 or CHEM 2455 )


BIOL 4520 - Develpmtl Biology & Embryology
Credits: 4.00
A course combining the fundamentals of embryology with the genetic and molecular analysis of embryonic development.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 4539 - Comparative Physiology
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to study the similarities and differences in how various animals have solved a wide variety of physiological problems imposed by the natural world in which they exist. The student will investigate the functions of the different organ systems in invertebrates and vertebrates. The main goal of this class is to focus on the observation of how problems in nature are solved by various organisms. A complete understanding of the physiology of the human is an absolute prerequisite for this course as this will be the point of reference for most discussions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 4541 - Plant Physiology
Credits: 4.00
This course is designed to give students a hands-on approach to understanding the metabolic activities of how plants grow develop throughout their lifecycles. Emphasis will be placed on plant environmental interactions, stress physiology, growth regulators, mineral nutrition, translocation, photosynthesis/respiration, and root/shoot physiology.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 4666 - Evolutionary Genomics
Credits: 3.00
This course covers the techniques by which genome sequences and genome functions are analyzed. This course also examines topics in evolutionary genomics such as comparative genomics, evolution of duplicate genes, evolution of genome structure and organization, evolution of protein function and evolution of gene expression.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1211K and CHEM 1212K ) or ( BIOL 1107 and BIOL 1107L and BIOL 1108 and BIOL 1108L and CHEM 1211K and CHEM 1212K )


BIOL 4727 - Essentials of Immunology
Credits: 4.00
Essentials of immunology is designed as an introduction to the immune response. The student will obtain a broad, comprehensive understanding of the principles of immunology. The course will focus on a detailed study of antigen-antibody interactions, humoral immunity, and cell-mediated immunity. Medically important syndromes, including AIDS, will be discussed to reinforce the principles of immunology. A laboratory component is included to support the exploration of immuno-diagnostic techniques.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: BIOL 3310


BIOL 4728 - Bacterial Pathogenesis
Credits: 4.00
Bacterial Pathogenesis introduces students to the field of medical microbiology and the study of infectious disease. Topics covered include a discussion of environmental and host factors involved in bacterial infection and disease, an introduction to epidemiology and nosocomial infections, an overview of innate and acquired host defenses, and an extensive survey of bacterial pathogens with special emphasis on virulence factors and molecular mechanisms underlying disease processes. The laboratory component will focus on methods routinely used to isolate, culture, and identify bacterial pathogens.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: BIOL 3310


BIOL 4729 - Medical Virology
Credits: 4.00
Medical virology is designed as an introduction to viruses that are involved in human disease. The student will obtain a broad, comprehensive understanding of the principles of virology using specific medical examples. The course will focus on a detailed study of the viral structure, replication gene expression, pathogenesis, and host defense. A laboratory component is included for the exploration of clinical virology techniques.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: BIOL 3310


BIOL 4730 - Emerging Pathogens
Credits: 4.00
The emerging pathogen course is designed to inform students of the dramatic changes and current developments in the area of infectious disease. The course will focus on the evolving microorganisms and the reasons that the pathogens emerged. Also the course will include discussions on the mechanisms of pathogenesis and the host defense.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: BIOL 3310


BIOL 4731 - Introduction to Toxicology
Credits: 3.00
The primary objective of the course is to present students with the concepts and practical applications of the science of toxicology. This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the principles of toxicology, focusing on the biochemical, physiological, and ecological effects of various toxicants. The use of toxicology in biomedical, pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and environmental research will be examined and discussed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 4732 - Biology of Aging
Credits: 3.00
Since the beginning of time , the fear of aging has preoccupied mankind. Only recently we are gaining insights into important clues about biological process of aging. In this course we will focus on some of the ideas about aging put forward by early alchemists to modern molecular biologists. Biological principles behind anti-aging, aging intervention agents, and life-style options will be discussed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 4733 - Animal Nutrition
Credits: 3.00
This course provides a basic understanding of the fundamentals of vertebrate nutrition and builds from what biology majors already know about physiology, biochemistry and general biology. Emphases are placed on digestion, absorption, and functions of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, nucleic acids, vitamins, minerals, and water to provide students with the ability to apply the logic of science in understanding diet and make decisions regarding health and nutrition of domestic animals. This course also integrates energy balance, general health, disease, and metabolism in order to consider nutrition as an integrative field.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 2455 or CHEM 2411 )


BIOL 4734 - Neuroscience
Credits: 3.00
Biology 4734W is an upper level Discipline-Specific Writing science course. This course will provide an understanding of human neuroanatomy, physiology and pharmacology of the nervous system and its voluntary and autonomic target and sensory organs. Other topics will include cognition, neural disorders and disorders of movement. Students taking this course should have passed BIOL 3513 (Physiology) CGEN 2411 (Organic Chemistry I) or BIOL 4503 (Biochemistry).
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: BIOL 3513 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 3526 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 4539 Minimum Grade: C


BIOL 4735 - Parasitology
Credits: 4.00
This course introduces students to the field of parasitology. Topics include parasite diversity, life cycles, host defense mechanisms, parasite evasion, host pathology, ecology, evolution, and control. The laboratory component of the course will examine parasites of medical and veterinary importance.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1107L Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 1108L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1211K or ( CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L ) ) and ( CHEM 1212K or ( CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L ) )


BIOL 4981 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Independent study of topics not offered in the current term. Independent study is only available for topics addressed by current courses if the topical course will not be offered during the academic year, or if the scheduling of the topical course is such that it will require a delay in timely completion of the degree for the student.
Lab: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 4983 - Adv Undergrad Biology Research
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
A course designed to allow students to conduct faculty-directed, independent research projects in areas of the biological sciences. The course may be repeated, but credit for BIOL 4983 may be applied toward biology degree requirements for a maximum of 4 credit hours.
Lab: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 4984 - Senior Biology Seminar
Credits: 1.00
This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to investigate areas of current interest in biology through the examination of primary biological literature and to develop (or further refine) oral presentation skills.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 4985 - Special Topics in Biology
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Specific titles will be announced for each term in class schedules and will be entered on transcripts.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00 Lab: .00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 4986 - Biological Internship
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Students wishing to enter an internship experience should discuss with their academic advisor the procedure for arranging the internship and the expectations for student performance. Credit hours received will be determined by the amount of time devoted to the internship. Variable Credit Course 1-4 hours. May be repeated for up to 12 hours.
Lab: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: BIOL 2107 and BIOL 2107L and BIOL 2108 and BIOL 2108L


BIOL 5241 - Entomology
Credits: 3.00
The study of insects. This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of insect taxonomy, morphology, physiology, behavior, and evolution. The relationships between insects and humans, other animals, and plants will be examined. The influences of insects on culture, religion, art, history, and colonization will be discussed. The laboratory will be devoted primarily to developing an understanding of insect identification.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5242 - Invertebrate Zoology
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of taxonomy, morphology, physiology, and evolution of the more common invertebrate phyla. The distribution and interspecific relationships among invertebrates and other forms of life will be presented and discussed. The laboratory will be devoted primarily to developing an understanding of insect identification.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 1.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5245 - Ichthyology
Credits: 3.00
The biology, systematics and taxonomy of fishes with an emphasis on the biodiversity/biogeography of fishes in the state of Georgia.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5266 - Molecular Ecology
Credits: 3.00
This course examines the use of molecular genetic data to the understanding of ecological and evolutionary processes in natural populations such as genetic diversity, dispersal, gene flow and phylogeography. This course will also examine how molecular genetic data is utilized to study behavioral mechanism such as mate selection and foraging. Application of molecular ecology principles to conservation will also be explored.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: D


BIOL 5315 - Bacterial Genetics
Credits: 3.00
Bacterial Genetics is an advanced microbiology course which focuses on the molecular genetics of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Topics addressed include the nature of the bacterial chromosome, the multi-step process of DNA replication, DNA damaging agents and mutations, DNA repair systems, mechanisms of gene transfer and antibiotic resistance, and the regulation of gene expression. The laboratory component reinforces concepts learned in lecture and familiarizes students with modern techniques used in genetic engineering and biotechnology.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5321 - Appl & Environmnt Microbiology
Credits: 3.00
The applied and environmental microbiology course is designed to expose students to the importance of microorganisms in industry and in the environment.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5325 - Advanced Medical Microbiology
Credits: 3.00
Advanced medical microbiology is designed to inform students of current developments in the areas of clinical and medical microbiology. The course will focus on mechanisms of pathogenesis and host defense. Discussion of new and emerging infectious agents will be addressed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5424 - Wildlife Habitat Ecology
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to familiarize biology graduate students with the ecology and management of terrestrial wildlife habitats. Ecological concepts and principles relevant to wildlife habitat structure and function will be evaluated from the individual, population, community, ecosystem, and landscape levels of organization. Management practices that affect the structure and function of wildlife habitats will be evaluated for agriculture and forest ecosystems. Concepts will be synthesized and reinforced by investigating the habitat requirements for a variety of wildlife species in the southwestern United States.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 2108L Minimum Grade: D


BIOL 5425 - Fire Ecology
CEUs: 4.00
This is a field-based course in fire ecology concepts and techniques of the Southeast. Hands-on lessons address the use of prescribed fire to benefit ecosystems and cover safety, weather, fuel, firing techniques and smoke management. Students will write a prescribed burn plan and participate in several burn events outside of regular class time.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 1.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5427 - Conservation Biology
CEUs: 4.00
Conservation biology is an interdisciplinary field with the main goal of preserving biodiversity. Course topics will cover ecosystem services, major threats, solutions, and policy related to biodiversity and endangered species. Students will apply their knowledge by conducting a local conservation research project and communication their findings.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 1.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5440 - Aquatic Ecology
Credits: 3.00
A study of biological, chemical, and physical components and interactions in freshwater systems. Field labs include a study of reservoirs and streams in west Georgia. A three-day field trip to the Georgia coast or the Okefenokee Swamp is required.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5441 - Animal Behavior
Credits: 3.00
A study of the mechanisms and adaptive functions of behaviors. The genetics, development, physiology, and ecology of behaviors are investigated with an evolutionary approach.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5445 - Marine Biology
Credits: 3.00
The biology, systematics and taxonomy of marine organisms with an emphasis on the ecological principles that influence their biogeography and distribution.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5450 - Terrestrial Ecology
Credits: 3.00
Terrestrial ecology is designed to give the student an overview of the structures and functions of populations, communities, and ecosystems in the major terrestrial biomes on Earth. Emphasis will be placed on ecological analyses and disturbance impact assessments in the dominant terrestrial ecosystems of the southeastern United States.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5520 - Develpmtl Biology & Embryology
Credits: 4.00
A course combining the fundamentals of embryology with the genetic and molecular analysis of embryonic development.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5539 - Comparative Physiology
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to study the similarities and differences in how various animals have solved a wide variety of physiological problems imposed by the natural world in which they exist. The student will investigate the functions of the different organ systems in invertebrates and vertebrates. The main goal of this class is to focus on the observation of how problems in nature are solved by various organisms. A complete understanding of the physiology of the human is an absolute prerequisite for this course as this will be the point of reference for most discussions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5541 - Plant Physiology
Credits: 3.00
Plant Physiology is intended to give students an overview of the processes which allow plants to function as living organisms. Emphasis will be placed on how plants interact with their environments.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5631 - Eukaryotic Molecular Genetics
Credits: 3.00
This course thoroughly examines the molecular aspects of nuclear structure and function. A special emphasis will be placed on understanding the experimental methods and interpretation of data on which current understanding is based.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5666 - Evolutionary Genomics
Credits: 3.00
This course covers the techniques by which genome sequences and genome functions are analyzed. This course also examines topics in evolutionary genomics such as comparative genomics, evolution or duplicate genes, evolution of genome structure and organization, evolution of protein function, and evolution of gene expression.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: BIOL 3621


BIOL 5727 - Essentials of Immunology
Credits: 3.00
Essentials of immunology is designed as an introduction to the immune response. The student will obtain a broad, comprehensive understanding of the principles of immunology. The course will focus on a detailed study of antigen-antibody interactions, humoral immunity, and cell-mediated immunity. Medically important syndromes, including AIDS, will be discussed to reinforce the principles of immunology. A laboratory component is included for the exploration of clinical immuno-diagnostic techniques.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5728 - Bacterial Pathogenesis
Credits: 3.00
Bacterial Pathogenesis is intended to familiarize graduate students with advanced topics in medical microbiology and the study of infectious disease. The course includes detailed discussions of factors involved in the infectious disease process, epidemiology, host defenses, and bacterial virulence factors. In addition, graduate students will be required to analyze and critique articles from the scientific literature, to compose a synopsis of their literature research, and orally present their work to the class. The laboratory component will focus on methods routinely used to isolate, culture, and identify bacterial pathogens. Graduate students will be required to present articles from microbiology journals and lead classroom discussions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5729 - Medical Virology
Credits: 3.00
Medical virology is designed as an introduction to viruses that are involved in human disease. The student will obtain a broad, comprehensive understanding of the principles of virology using specific medical examples. The course will focus on a detailed study of the viral structure, replication, gene expression, pathogenesis, and host defense. A laboratory component is included for the exploration of clinical techniques.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5730 - Emerging Pathogens
Credits: 3.00
The emerging pathogen course is designed to inform students of the dramatic changes and current developments in the area of infectious disease. The course will focus on the evolving microorganisms and the reasons that the pathogens emerged. Also the course will include discussions on the mechanisms of pathogenesis and the host defense.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5731 - Introduction to Toxicology
Credits: 3.00
The primary objective of the course is to present students with the concepts and practical applications of the science of toxicology. This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the principles of toxicology, focusing on the biochemical, physiological, and ecological effects of various toxicants. The use of toxicology in biomedical, pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and environmental research will be examined and discussed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5732 - Biology of Aging
Credits: 3.00
Course will focus on some of the ideas about aging put forward by early alchemists to modern molecular biologists. Will discuss the biological principles behind anti-aging and aging intervention agents, as well as life-style options.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 5735 - Parasitology
Credits: 3.00
This course introduces students to the field of parasitology. Topics covered include parasite diversity, life cycles, host defense mechanisms, parasite evasion, host pathology, ecology, evolution, and control. The laboratory component of the course will examine parasites of medical and veterinary importance.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology
Pre-requisites: ( BIOL 1107 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 1108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 3310 or BIOL 3526 )


BIOL 5985 - Special Topics In Biology
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Specific titles will be announced for each term in class schedules and will be entered on transcripts.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00 Lab: .00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 6150 - Scientific Integr & Propriety
Credits: 3.00
A course designed to inform students of the ethical and professional obligations of scientific investigation and communication. Students will be instructed in proper methods for record keeping and for reporting scientific discoveries. Topics such as scientific integrity, authorship, peer review, ethical use of animals in research, conflict of interest, ownership of data, and intellectual property will also be addressed. Case studies will be used heavily as teaching tools. This course is recommended for all graduate students conducting research in the department, and is required for all students who are supported from federal funds for their research or degree program.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 6325 - Procaryotic Biology
Credits: 3.00
This course is intended to introduce graduate students to the complexity and diversity of procaryotic organisms, including the eubacteria and archaea. The course will involve both lecture and laboratory learning, will engage problem solving skills, and will require extensive written and oral communication components.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 6503 - Biol Perspectives:Biochemistry
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to study the interactions of biochemical pathways and the control systems that function to regulate cell and whole body metabolism. This course emphasizes the regulation of biochemical pathways as opposed to the mechanisms involved in each enzymatic step within a given pathway.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 6513 - Human Physiology
Credits: 3.00
A survey of the mechanisms involved in the function of the human body. Study is approached from the organ system level to address muscular, neural, hormonal, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, renal, and reproductive functions. Correlation will be made to the similarity between the demands placed on living systems regardless of whether the organism is multicellular or a single cell.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 6526 - Histology
Credits: 3.00
A microanatomical study of cell and tissue structure. Emphasis is on the complex nature of tissues and how the cellular associations within the tissue contribute to the overall functions of the tissues. Laboratory is devoted to preparation and interpretation of tissue samples.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 6981 - Graduate Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Independent study of topics not offered in the current term. Independent study is only available for topics addressed by current courses if the topical course will not be offered during the academic year, or if the scheduling of the topical course is such that it will require a delay in timely completion of the degree for the student.
Lab: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 6982 - Directed Readings
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Directed readings are available for graduate students who need to conduct an independent review of the literature in a topic not addressed by the curriculum of the department. Students must complete a statement of understanding and expectation and must have the topic approved by their major professor and either the graduate coordinator or the department chair. Selected readings are appropriate for topics related to thesis research or for topics that provide a foundation for comprehensive examinations for non-thesis track students.
Lab: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 6983 - Graduate Research
Credits: 1.00 to 12.00
The research course is designed to teach students methods for biological research. Student will conduct research under the supervision of a faculty mentor and will learn proper methods for record keeping and report writing. Each student will work on a unique research project to be selected by the faculty mentor and the student. The research conducted is expected to provide the basis for the thesis for students in a thesis track degree program.
Lab: 1.00 to 12.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 6984 - Graduate Biology Seminar
Credits: 1.00
Graduate seminar will meet each term. Each offering will have a different topical focus, to be determined by the faculty discussion leader. All students will select an area to present that is consistent with the topic for the term. Students are also expected to fully participate in the discussions generated by student presentations. Graduate students should enroll in graduate seminar each term.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 6985 - Graduate Spec Topics in Biol
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Specific titles will be announced for each term in class schedules and will be entered on transcripts.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00 Lab: .00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 6995 - Comprehensive Exam
Credits: 2.00
Comprehensive examination should be taken by all students in a non-thesis track program during the last term in their graduate degree program. The student will complete an examination of a body of biological work as determined by the graduate committee. The student must submit to an examination to be coordinated by the student's major professor and composed by the graduate committee. The examination will generally be an oral format, however, the graduate committee and student may elect an alternative format with sufficient justification.
Other: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology


BIOL 6999 - Thesis
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00

Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Biology



Birth Through Five

Birth Through Five


BRFV 4210 - Home, School and Community
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed for students who are currently employed or who are preparing to work in early childhood settings. This course will help students to establish and maintain positive and productive working relationships with families within the context of the urban community to benefit the well being of the growing child. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline will be part of the course.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


BRFV 4220 - Spec Ed Stratagies: Birth-Five
Credits: 3.00
This course provides information on curricula, instructional strategies, service environments, and staffing roles for teachers of young (0-5) children with disabilities.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


BRFV 4230 - Methods for Pre-K and K
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to familiarize students with developmentally appropriate programs for preschool children in inclusive classroom settings.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed



Business

Business


BUSA 1900 - Surf the Internet for Success
Credits: 2.00
An introduction to Internet basics such as using e-mail, participating in electronic discussion groups, and exploring the World Wide Web (WWW). Emphasis will be on using the Internet as a useful source of information for the social sciences, business education, consumer decision making, and career planning. This course satisfies the two-hour institutional priority listed under Area B.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management


BUSA 1901 - Personal and Consumer Law
Credits: 2.00
A course designed to familiarize students with the legal environment in which they live. This includes the operation of the U.S. legal system, alternative dispute resolution and conflict management, and rights and obligations arising in various consumer, domestic, business, and employment contexts.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management


BUSA 1910 - Using Info Tech Today & Tommor
Credits: 2.00
A course designed to assure a basic level of computer applications literacy, to include word processing, presentations software, LAN, e-mail and Internet utilizations.
Lecture: 1.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management


BUSA 1XXX - University Syst Studies Abroad
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00

Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management


BUSA 2010 - Microcomputer App in Business
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to provide an introduction to the use of microcomputer applications in business. The course will emphasize the use of the spreadsheet and the integration of these in analysis for business decisions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor


BUSA 2106 - Legal & Ethical Envrnmt of Bus
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the legal, regulatory, and ethical environment of business, considering the interrelationship and impact of political, social, cultural, environmental, technological, international, and diversity issues. Requires overall GPA of 2.0
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 Other: .00
College: College of Business
Department: Management
Pre-requisites: GPA 2.00 or above required 2.0


BUSA 3050 - Business Statistics
Credits: 3.00
Designed to provide the student with the ability to understand the basic tasks of statistics and to develop a working knowledge of the concepts and principles of the basic practice of statistics.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: MATH 1111 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1101 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1120 Minimum Grade: C


BUSA 3060 - Quantitative Management
Credits: 3.00
This is the second course in business statistics, including analysis of variance, regression analysis, nonparametric statistical tests, X2 test, and time series analysis.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: BUSA 3050 Minimum Grade: C


BUSA 3090 - Business Law
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an examination of the civil and business organization systems as it pertains to business and business formation. The course will help those with a business background, or seeking a business degree, to have a better understanding of business and corporate structure, business liability, contract issues, sales, psersonal and real estate property issues encountered by business owners and business managers.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor


BUSA 3105 - Communications in the Bus Env
Credits: 3.00
Theory and practice in the use of correct, forceful English in business letters, reports, and other written and oral communication formats found in the business world, as well as an examination of non-verbal means of communication.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C


BUSA 3150 - Business Finance
Credits: 3.00
BUSA 3150 is an introduction to financial management of non-financial corporations. It emphasizes financial statement analysis, time value of money, valuation of various classes of securities, and the estimation, analysis of cash flows in the capital budgeting process.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2101 Minimum Grade: C


BUSA 3400 - E-Commerce
Credits: 3.00
This course examines the foundation, operation, and implications of state-of-the-art Internet economy. By experiencing Internet shopping and analyzing e-commerce companies, students will learn the components needed to engage in electronic commerce. Students will have hands on exercises in creating e-commerce based on these technologies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: BUSA 2010 Minimum Grade: C


BUSA 3500 - Agricultural Economics
Credits: 3.00
This is an introductory course on the basic principles of agricultural economics. Production and consumer economics, agricultural policy, food marketing, futures markets, marketing of agricultural products, the farm services sector, and the world food situation are topics to be covered.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ECON 2105 Minimum Grade: C or ECON 2106 Minimum Grade: C


BUSA 4970 - Business Practicum
Credits: 3.00
Practical experience gained by "employment" in the workplace and in the accomplishment of one or more special projects pertinent to the activities of the sponsoring agency or organization.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor



Counseling & Educ Psych

Counseling & Educ Psych


CEPD 2101 - Childhood Development
Credits: 3.00
This course is an in-depth study of the theories and processes of human development from birth through pre-adolescence. Special emphasis is placed on the developmental requirements and characteristics of children prior to and during schooling up through pre-adolescence, as well as developmental readiness as it applies to the teaching and learning process.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Educ Technology & Foundations
Pre-requisites: Educ Area F permission requird AF


CEPD 2102 - Developmental Psychology
Credits: 2.00
A survey of human development as explored through various psychological perspectives. Although development from conception through adulthood will be examined, the emphasis will be placed upon conception through adolescence. This course is designed to facilitate an awareness of childhood and adolescence as we explore experiences of children in families, peer relationships, and schools of today. Physical, psychosocial, moral and intellectual development will be examined through a variety of in-class activities. Lecture and discussion topics will be selected from your text which should be your primary reference for all class activities.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Educ Technology & Foundations
Pre-requisites: Educ Area F permission requird AF


CEPD 2120 - Career Life Planning
Credits: 2.00
This course is designed to expose undergraduate freshmen and sophomores to variables involved in career choice. These variables include self-assessment, career information, the decision-making process, establishment of short and decision-making process, establishment of short and long-range goals, and interview and resume preparation. There is an additional fee for two career inventories, which are part of the assessment process. These inventories are to be taken at the Student Development Center.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 2121 - Organizational Leadership
Credits: 3.00
This course will analyze the impact of leadership on organizational effectiveness. It will attempt to differentiate between a leader and a manager, and how each can be vital to an organization’s success. Students will also learn new attributes of successful leaders, including interpersonal skills, attitudes, and behaviors, which can facilitate effective leadership within different types of organizations. The course explores the processes, stages, and leadership capacities and skills for leading change in organizations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 3200 - Skills & Ethics in Human Serv.
Credits: 3.00
This undergraduate course is an introduction to the basic communication and group management skills required of effective human service workers, and the legal and ethical considerations that accompany human services work. Students will learn strategies for active listening, effective communication, understanding and managing group dynamics, and identifying and responding to legal and ethical issues in the workplace.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 Other: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 4101 - Educational Psychology
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the psychological theories and principles applied to the classroom. The course will include aspects of learning, motivation, classroom management, and assessment. Emphasis will be placed on developmentally designed instruction for all students.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Educ Technology & Foundations
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE or SLPA Upper Level SLPA


CEPD 4106 - Seminar/Residence Hall Staff
Credits: 2.00
The purpose of the class is to provide the resident assistant with additional training that will assist in job performance and to provide supplemental learning activities that will allow individuals to explore new arenas of self-awareness.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 4150 - Tests and Measurements
Credits: 3.00
This course is concerned with the theory and practice of educational and psychological measurement. The focus is on the technology of measurement rather than on the development of skill in the use of any given measuring instrument. Classroom test construction will be emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE


CEPD 4200 - Wrk w/Diverse Pop in Hum Serv
Credits: 3.00
This course provides knowledge, skills and awareness related to the effective delivery of human services to diverse populations in contemporary society.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 Other: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 6101 - Psychology of Classroom Learn
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an in-depth study of the major cognitive and behavioral theories of classroom learning. Emphasis will be placed on enabling teachers and counselors to better understand how students learn; on helping educators identify and remove barriers that impede student learning; and on helping educators develop, utilize and advocate teaching practices, programs, and curriculum that lead to academic success for all. Theories of motivation, classroom management practices, and belief systems that promote learning will also be addressed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Educ Technology & Foundations


CEPD 6106 - Seminar/Residence Hall Staff
Credits: 2.00
The purpose of the class is to provide the resident assistant with additional training that will assist in job performance and to provide supplemental learning activities that will allow individuals to explore new arenas of self-awareness.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 6131 - Counseling Theories
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to selected, prominent counseling theories. Focus is on relating theory to practice and on comparing and contrasting the key concepts, techniques, counselor and client roles, counselor-client relationships, methods of assessment and the contributions and limitations of each theory.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 6135 - Applied Counseling Theories
Credits: 3.00
An application of selected, prominent counseling theories with emphasis placed upon short-term therapies. Focus is on the practical application of foundational theories and skill building through practice and feedback to develop professional strengths in applying the counseling theories/techniques/skills to practical situations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 6140 - Basic Counseling Skills
Credits: 3.00
An overview of basic, therapeutic interviewing skill building through practice and feedback to develop personal strengths in counseling. This course also provides students with an orientation to professional counseling organizations, the developmental history of the counseling profession, as well as ethical, legal and professional issues.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 6141 - Prin of Clincl Mntl Hlth Couns
Credits: 3.00
This foundational course provides an overview of clinical mental health counseling including theoretical and historical foundations of the profession; education, credentialing and practice issues; roles and functions of clinical mental health counselors in various practice settings; contemporary issues and trends; professional issues that affect clinical mental health counselors; and management of clinical mental health services.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 6143 - Prof Counseling Orientation
Credits: 3.00
The design of this course is to provide an orientation to the roles and functions of professional counselors. The course emphasizes the legal and ethical issues that guide the activities of professional counselors. It introduces the consultative process utilized in conducting ethically appropriate interagency work.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 6151 - Asesmnt & Appraisl in Counslng
Credits: 3.00
Methods for the assessment of individuals in counseling will be taught, including clinical interviewing techniques, mental status exam, use of the APA Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), test selection, administration, scoring, interpretation, and reporting of results. Selection and interpretation of assessment tools appropriate for community and school settings will be addressed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 6160 - Group Counseling
Credits: 3.00
Studies that provide both theoretical and experiential understandings of group purpose, development, dynamics, counseling theories, group counseling methods and skills, and other group approaches. This course also includes 10 hours of experience as a group member.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling
Pre-requisites: CEPD 6131 and CEPD 6140


CEPD 6180 - Princpl of Prof Schol Counslng
Credits: 3.00
This course is a foundational course to prepare school counselors as leaders who strengthen elementary, middle and secondary education and also serve as effective change agents in a multicultural environment. The content of the course includes an overview of the functional skills necessary for the delivery of a school counseling program and the principles underlying the work of the school counselor. Emphasis is placed upon the role of the counselor as an advocate for student success in school and life. Professional skills in six arenas - advocacy, brokering of services, collaboration, counseling, effective use of data, and leadership, are introduced. Technology will be integrated throughout the course.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 6182 - Internship: Prof Counseling
Credits: 1.00 to 6.00
The counseling internship is designed to give candidates an opportunity to continue integrating and applying the awareness, knowledge, and skills learned throughout the counseling training program. Candidates will deliver counseling services in a field setting, and receive supervision of their work in biweekly group seminars for discussion of on-site issues, ethical issues, professional development, tape presentations, in-service training, and participation in peer supervision. A minimum of 600 on-site hours (240 direct service) for internship is required. CEPD 6182 Prerequisites: CEPD 6188 and College of Education Field Experience Application approval required.
Lecture: 1.00 to 6.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling
Pre-requisites: CEPD 6188 and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


CEPD 6185 - Internship:Community Counsel
Credits: 1.00 to 9.00
Advanced professional counseling experience for graduate students in community counseling program must be taken for a maximum of 6 hours credit as part of M.Ed. program. May be repeated for credit as part of Ed.S. program with prior approval of advisor.
Lab: 2.00 to 18.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling
Pre-requisites: Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


CEPD 6186 - Internship:School Counseling
Credits: 1.00 to 9.00
Advanced professional counseling experience for graduate students in school counseling.
Lecture: 1.00 to 9.00 Lab: 1.00 to 9.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling
Pre-requisites: Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


CEPD 6187 - Practicum: School Counseling
Credits: 3.00
This course emphasizes supervision of individual and group counseling and guidance conducted in field settings. Special attention is paid to the development of skills, interventions, and brokering of services. The foundation for the course is brief counseling approaches. A return to for the course is brief counseling approaches. A return to campus for individual supervision is a requirement of the course. A minimum of 100 hours is required.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling
Pre-requisites: Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


CEPD 6188 - Practicum: Prof Counseling
Credits: 3.00
This course emphasizes supervision of individual and group counseling and guidance conducted in field settings. Special attention is paid to the development of skills, interventions, and brokering of services. The foundation for the course is brief counseling approaches. A return to campus for individual supervision is a requirement of the course. A minimum of 150 hours is required. CEPD 6188 Prerequisites: CEPD 6131, CEPD 6140, CEPD 6160 and College of Education Field Experience Application approval is required.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling
Pre-requisites: CEPD 6131 and CEPD 6140 and CEPD 6160 and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


CEPD 6189 - Practicum:Community Counseling
Credits: 3.00
This course emphasizes supervision of individual and group counseling conducted in both laboratory and community settings. Audio/videotaping of sessions is required. In addition to onsite supervision, individual and group faculty supervision is a requirement of the course. A minimum of 150 hours is required. The breakdown of these hours is specified in the Counseling and Educational Psychology Practicum and Internship Handbook.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling
Pre-requisites: Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


CEPD 7105 - Counseling Across Lifespan
Credits: 3.00
This graduate course is a study of human growth and development from birth through aging and death. The course focuses on areas of physical, cognitive, social, personality, and emotional development as a series of progressive changes resulting from the biological being's interactions with the environment. Special emphasis is placed on the development characteristics of school age youth within a multicultural and diverse society.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 7111 - Dg & Trtmnt of Mntl & Emtnl Di
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to give an overview and provide an understanding of abnormal behavior in the context of the diagnostic categories as described in the most recent edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder (5th Ed.) [DSM-5] and the diagnostic system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the processes of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of mental and emotional disorders and factors influencing these.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 7112 - Career Theory and Intervention
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to help students in a master's level or higher curriculum become competent in the use of educational and occupational information in counseling-related activities. Particular emphasis will be placed on how information is processed in planning, establishing and managing careers from a life-span perspective.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 7121 - Issues & Trends Prof Sch Couns
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an introduction to various professional issues, current topics, and trends related to the profession of school counseling. Emerging issues in the field, such as those identified by CACREP and the PSC, will serve as a foundation for this course. Relevant topics may include, but are not limited to, the role of addiction in school counseling, strategies for school-based consultation and collaboration, instructional technologies relevant to school counseling, career and college readiness, differential instruction, and data-informed school counseling programming procedures.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 7130 - Assess & Effective Use of Data
Credits: 3.00
The purpose of this course is to help educational leaders in training develop proficiency in the use of test scores as data to make decisions that relate to students' achievement,as well as to students' personal, social, and emotional well-being. Those enrolled will learn how to evaluate psychometric instruments and interpret various test scores. In addition, students will learn how to use test data to gain equal opportunities for all students, how to use test data to identify and target areas for support when needed, and how to use test data to advocate and effect change within the school, school system, and community.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 7134 - Couples & Family Counseling
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an overview of the nature of family systems relationships and family development. Particular emphasis will be given to the theory and practice of marital and family therapy. Students will examine both theoretical and empirical elements of family counseling which can be applied to marriage and family systems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 7135 - Cognitive-Behavior Therapy
Credits: 3.00
An in-depth study of cognitive-behavioral therapy and its application to a wide range of clients, including use with emotional and behavioral disorders. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between theory and practice, and on the development of cognitive-behavioral therapy skills.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling
Pre-requisites: CEPD 6140 and CEPD 6131


CEPD 7136 - Counslg Childrn & Adolesncnts
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on encouraging the unique development and emotional growth of children through the process of counseling. The content of the course introduces a distinct group of interventions including play and communication skills as integral components of the therapeutic process. A major focus of the course involves instructional and experiential opportunities for the student counselor to develop skills that provide children with appropriate developmental materials and facilitate a safe relationship for the child to express models that can be applied to elementary age children.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling
Pre-requisites: CEPD 6140


CEPD 7137 - Sexual Abuse Counseling
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to familiarize students with issues related to counseling sexually abused children, adult survivors, and their families as well as perpetrators of sexual abuse.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 7138 - Multicultural Counseling
Credits: 3.00
An examination of selected issues relevant to understanding multicultural lifespan differences, counseling process and practice.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 7141 - Pro Orient & Ethics in Counsel
Credits: 3.00
Studies that provide an understanding of professional roles and functioning of counselors and the application of ethical and legal considerations in professional counseling.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 7145 - Advocacy and Leadership
Credits: 3.00
This course emphasizes 'theory to practice' by providing experiences that allow students to assess and develop their personal leadership while emphasizing the values, knowledge and skills required for effective advocacy and brokering of services through consultation and collaboration Special emphasis is placed on the development of skills in planning, organizing, coordinating and delivering programs that generate systematic change. Use of data to identify needs, remove barriers and mobilize resources from schools and communities in order to increase options for students and clients are primary themes throughout the course.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 7152 - Research & Program Evaluation
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to provide counselors with the research knowledge and skills necessary to evaluate individual and group counseling interventions, as well as educational programs. An emphasis will be placed on the collection and use of quantitative and qualitative data to evaluate programs. Counselors in training will also learn how to communicate data and findings to others to effect change and to act as advocates for students/clients.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 7153 - Crisis Intervention
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of crisis intervention and trauma counseling. Students will be prepared to recognize, understand, and respond to the needs of individuals who are experiencing or have experienced individual, family, or community level crises, disasters, or trauma.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 7155 - Substance Abuse Counseling
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed for counselors and other human service providers working in a variety of settings, including schools, community agencies, private practices, and hospitals. Topics covered include the classification of drugs and their effects on users; various models of addiction; the use of assessment, diagnosis, and prevention strategies with individuals, families, and groups; relapse prevention; and legal, ethical and multicultural issues associated with addictions work.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 7158 - Counseling in the Military Com
Credits: 3.00
Examines essential knowledge and current research on issues that impact military personnel and their families and how the helping professions can assist in addressing these issues. Analyzes the unique concerns that affect military families through pre-, during and post-deployment, as well as significant issues for children and adults in school and agency settings. Also addresses issues relating to student veterans pursuing post-secondary education.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 7181 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Preparation of an independent project under the direction of a faculty member. Advanced topics in theory, issues, trends, clients, and counseling techniques will be emphasized. Students will specialize in topics, studies, and projects in the area of specialty.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 7182 - Directed Readings
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Consent of advisor and/or instructor required for registration. The aim of the course is to allow a student to investigate an area not covered in existing courses. Such independent study requires research skills and motivation to acquire an advanced level of knowledge and understanding in selected topics. An integrated research paper of the reading is required. .
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 7185 - Spec Top in Couns & Educ Psy
Credits: 3.00
Title and description of specific courses to be inserted at time of offering. May be repeated for credit.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 8102 - Lifespan Human Development
Credits: 3.00
This graduate course is a study of human growth and development from birth through aging and death. The course focuses on areas of physical, cognitive, social, personality, and emotional development as a series of progressive changes resulting from the biological being's interactions with the environment. Special emphasis is placed on the development characteristics of school age youth within a multicultural and diverse society.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Educ Technology & Foundations


CEPD 8131 - Adv Theories of Counseling
Credits: 3.00
An in-depth study of the theories of counseling for advanced students in school or community counseling programs.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 8138 - Advanced Multicultural Counsel
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed for students in the Ed.S. program to develop advanced competencies for counseling intervention with diverse populations. Students will learn specific theories and techniques for counseling multicultural populations. Special attention will be given to working with minority, non-dominant, and oppressed populations. Students will examine their own attitudes, behaviors, perceptions, and biases to developing culturally aware approaches to counseling and/or administration.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 8140 - Advanced Group Counseling
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed for students wishing to pursue advanced study in group theory, group leadership, group processes, and group supervision. The course may examine contemporary trends and developments in group counseling as well as ethical, legal, process, and professional issues affecting the practice of group counseling.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling
Pre-requisites: CEPD 6160


CEPD 8141 - Supervision in Counseling
Credits: 3.00
This course will provide students with advanced knowledge, skills and awareness of supervision in professional counseling settings. The focus is on the development of effective clinical supervision style and skills, and integrates ethical, legal, multicultural and other professional issues related to professional counseling settings. Pre-requisite: Admission to the Ed.S. program in Professional Counseling.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 8152 - Consult, Collab, & Dev in Coun
Credits: 3.00
This course prepares students for competent professional practice as clinical mental health counselors and school counselors functioning in the role of consultant. Consultation theory and process will be discussed. Examples of consultation with families, schools, colleges and community agencies will be provided, as well as models for facilitating change in human systems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 8156 - Designing Effective Programs
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed for graduate students who have been admitted into the education specialist program in professional counseling. The course addresses steps involved in effectiveness-based program planning, including elements of a program that are critical for measuring effectiveness.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 8171 - Current Issues in Coun/Supvsn
Credits: 3.00
This seminar is designed for graduate students who have been admitted to the Ed.S. program in professional counseling and supervision. Special topics and current issues in counseling and supervision will be critically examined. An exchange of scholarly thinking and research will be the hallmark of classroom interactions and assignments. Pre-requisite: Admission to the Ed.S. program in Professional Counseling.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 8184 - Research Quantitative Analysis
Credits: 3.00
This course presents basic methods of empirical inquiry used in counseling-related settings. Students will learn how to interpret published quantitative research studies, identify appropriate measurement instruments, and statistically analyze inferential data to answer research questions. Students will also complete appropriate trainings demonstrating their understanding of ethical considerations for human-subject research.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 8185 - Professional Research Writing
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed for graduate students who have been admitted into the Ed.S. program in Professional Counseling. The purpose of this course is to equip students with knowledge and skills in the area of professional writing. In this course, students will review the basic grammatical principles and conventions necessary to communicate effectively in written form. Moreover, students will learn technical writing techniques and the structure of a professional manuscript. Students will apply this knowledge through course-embedded assignments that promote skill development, helping students learn to successfully write across a range of topics, from short reports to research manuscripts.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 8189 - Advanced Internship
Credits: 3.00
Enrollment requires admission to Ed.S. program. The internship is an organized and supervised set of training experiences (paid or unpaid), the purpose of which is to enhance one's ability to function professionally as a counselor. Flexibility to tailor the internship to one's professional goals and objectives is a major strength of the Ed.S. counseling internship. Students will work in an approved internship site under the super-vision of an appropriately credentialed supervisor for a minimum of 150 hours. May be repeated for credit.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 8190 - Adv Practicum:School Counsel
Credits: 3.00
Practical experience with actual individual clients in school (P-12) and agency settings. These counseling sessions are taped and critiqued by the Practicum instructor. May be repeated for credit.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling
Pre-requisites: Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


CEPD 8191 - Adv Practicum:Community Counsl
Credits: 3.00
This course emphasizes supervision of individual and group counseling interventions conducted in field settings; special attention is paid to the development of evaluative criteria for self and peer assessment. A minimum of 15 hours in the field placement is required and graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 8194 - Resch: Mixed Methods Analysis
Credits: 3.00
This course presents an applied approach to learning mixed methods research. Students will learn how to design mixed methods studies, collect and analyze data, integrate findings, and draw inferences using both qualitative and quantitative approaches in a single study. Pre-requisite: Admission to the Ed.S. program in Professional Counseling.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 8197 - School Guidance Prog Develop
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to enable school counselors to engage in strategic planning to improve this school guidance program. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of planning skills to assess, evaluate, and improve the functioning of the school guidance program in order to meet the needs of students in elementary, middle, and high schools. Students will also become more familiar with P-12 school guidance programs.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 9151 - Doctoral Independent Study
CEUs: 1.00 to 3.00
Preparation of an independent project under the direction of a faculty member. Advanced topics in theory, issues, trends, clients, and counseling techniques will be emphasized. Students will specialize in topics, studies, and projects in the area of specialty.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 9171 - Program Evaluation
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on the theories, concepts, and processes involved in planning and managing evaluations. Students will engage in evaluations in specific counseling situations (individual, group, organizational) using focus groups, key stakeholder interviews, survey design, data gathering, analysis and/or other methods as appropriate and analyze outcomes to make recommendations for development and/or remediation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 9183 - Directed Doctoral Research
Credits: 3.00
Individual injury on a research problem consisting of a plan for data collection and analysis, as well as, critical review, integration and interpretation of research literature.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 9184 - Doc Seminar-Professional Issue
Credits: 3.00
This course is a special topics seminar structured to address professional issues in counseling. An exchange of scholarly thinking and research will be the hallmark of classroom interactions and activities.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 9185 - Doctoral Seminar-Advocacy
Credits: 3.00
This course is a special topics seminar structured to address advocacy of marginalized and underserved populations in counseling. An exchange of scholarly thinking and research will be the hallmark of classroom interactions and activities.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 9186 - Doctoral Internship
Credits: 3.00
This course entails a minimum of 300 clock hours of supervised experiences over the course of two semesters. One experience of 150 hours focuses on administrative supervision in counseling and one experience of 150 hours focuses on program evaluation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 9187 - Doctoral Practicum in Suprvisn
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to provide closely directed advanced experience in supervision of professional counseling. The focus is on development of effective clinical supervision style and skills via recording and critique of supervision sessions. Ethical, legal, multicultural and other professional issues are addressed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


CEPD 9199 - Dissertation
Credits: 1.00 to 12.00
The dissertation experience requires the designing and conducting of an independent scholarly inquiry guided by a faculty dissertation committee.
Lecture: 1.00 to 12.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling



Chemistry

Chemistry


CHEM 1000 - Workshop for CHEM 1151K
Credits: .00
Workshop/discussion for Chemistry 1151.
Other: .00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 1001 - Workshop for CHEM 1211K
Credits: .00
Workshop/discussion for Chemistry 1211K.
Other: .00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 1002 - Workshop for CHEM 1152K
Credits: .00
Workshop/discussion for CHEM 1152K
Lab: .00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 1003 - Workshop for CHEM 1212K
Credits: .00
Workshop/discussion for CHEM 1212K
Lab: .00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 1100 - Introductory Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
A one semester course covering some basic concepts and applications of chemistry for non-science majors. There is an optional laboratory component.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 1100L - Introductory Chemistry Lab
Credits: 1.00
Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1100.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 1100


CHEM 1151K - Survey of Chemistry I
Credits: 4.00
First course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic, and biochemistry for allied health professions and non-science majors. Topics to be covered include: elements and compounds, chemical equations, organic nomenclature, and molecular geometry. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. MATH 1111 may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: MATH 1111


CHEM 1152K - Survey of Chemistry II
Credits: 4.00
Second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic, and biochemistry for allied health professions and non-science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: CHEM 1151K Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 1211 - Principles of Chemistry I
Credits: 3.00
First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. MATH 1113 and CHEM 1211L may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: ( MATH 1113 or MATH 1112 ) and CHEM 1211L


CHEM 1211K - Princ of Chemistry I and Lab
Credits: 4.00
First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/ .
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: eCore Introduction Quiz C and MATH 1113


CHEM 1211L - Principles of Chemistry I Lab
Credits: 1.00
Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1211.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 1211


CHEM 1212 - Principles of Chemistry II
Credits: 3.00
Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include chemical bonding, properties of solids, liquids and gases, solutions, equilibria, acids and bases, solubility, thermodynamics, kinetics and electricity. Corequisite: CHEM 1212L
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 1212L
Pre-requisites: ( ( CHEM 1211 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1211L Minimum Grade: C ) or CHEM 1211K Minimum Grade: C ) and ( MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C or ( MATH 1111 Minimum Grade: C and MATH 1112 Minimum Grade: C ) )


CHEM 1212K - Princ of Chemistry II and Lab
Credits: 4.00
Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/ .
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: ( CHEM 1211K Minimum Grade: C or ( CHEM 1211 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1211L Minimum Grade: C ) and MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C and eCore Introduction Quiz C )


CHEM 1212L - Principles of Chemistry II Lab
Credits: 1.00
Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1212.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 1212


CHEM 1230K - Accelerated Prin of Chemistry
Credits: 4.00
Designed for the student with superior pre-college preparation. Principles of chemistry will be explored in an integrated class/laboratory setting. Topics will include reactions and reaction stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, properties of solids, liquids and gases, solutions, equilibria, acids and bases, solubility, thermodynamics and kinetics, and electrochemistry. May not be taken for credit after successful completion of CHEM 1212.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 2083 - Selected Projects in Chemistry
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Title and description of course to be specified at time of offering.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 2130 - Sophomore Chemistry Seminar
Credits: 1.00
A course designed to introduce Chemistry majors to current literature and career opportunities in Chemistry and allied fields. Faculty will present brief seminars pertaining to their research and topics of current interest. Students will carry out literature searches and make oral and/or written presentations on topics chosen in consultation with the instructor(s).
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1212K Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 2411 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.00
The first course of a two semester sequence which provides a broad introduction to the basic principles, theories and applications of the chemistry of carbon compounds. Topics will include modern structural theory, organic nomenclature, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and kinetics, and an introduction to functional group chemistry. Also covers the interpretation of IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy for the structure determination of organic compounds. CHEM 2411L may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 2411L
Pre-requisites: ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: B and CHEM 1212L Minimum Grade: C ) or CHEM 1212K Minimum Grade: B


CHEM 2411L - Organic Chemistry I Lab
Credits: 1.00
Emphasis of this laboratory will be on fundamental techniques and will provide experience with purification, physical and spectroscopic characterization and synthesis of organic substances.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 2411


CHEM 2422 - Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.00
The second course will systematically explore reactions of carbon-containing compounds and the mechanistic pathways involved in these processes. Reactions that will be discussed include functional group transformations, oxidation, reductions, cyclo-additions and carbon-carbon bond formation. The course begins to teach the student how to systematically design a multi-step synthesis of complex organic compounds. CHEM 2422L may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 2422L
Pre-requisites: CHEM 2411 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 2422L


CHEM 2422L - Organic Chemistry II Lab
Credits: 1.00
Emphasis of this laboratory will be on synthesis and characterization of organic substances will be included.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 2422


CHEM 2455 - Principles of Organic Chem
Credits: 3.00
Comprehensive one semester course that emphasizes those aspects of organic chemistry that are relevant to the study of biology. Whenever possible, correlations to biological molecules, medicine and disease will be made. Will cover fundamentals of contemporary organic chemistry including electronic structure, stereochemistry, and reactions of carbonyl and carboxylic acid derivatives. This one semester course will adequately prepare students for biochemistry courses. Will not fulfill the organic chemistry requirement for chemistry majors.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 2455L
Pre-requisites: ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1212L Minimum Grade: C ) or CHEM 1212K Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 2455L - Princ of Organic Chem Lab
Credits: 1.00
The purpose of this course is to apply the knowledge obtained in Principles of Organic Chemistry lecture to problem solving in the laboratory. Students will develop good laboratory techniques, including: isolate and purify organic substances, characterize substances prepared by physical means, correlate the physical properties of organic substances with their molecular structure, work safely, take data carefully, record relevant observation, use time effectively, and assess the efficiency of experimental methods.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 2455
Pre-requisites: ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1212L Minimum Grade: C ) or CHEM 1212K Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 3010 - Law & Administration of Chem
Credits: 3.00
Categories of hazardous chemicals, their origin, impact on society, state and federal regulations, handling, storage and disposal will be discussed. Case studies of hazardous chemicals will include asbestos, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, batteries. Regulations, particularly RCRA, CERCLA, OSHA, TSCA, SARA, NEPA, HMTA, CWA will be discussed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1212K Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 3130 - Modern Forensic Science
Credits: 3.00
Case-oriented approach will be used to explore selected topics of forensic science. These include: (1) the scientific and technological foundation for the examination of evidence; (2) the scope of expert qualifications and testimony, the legal status of scientific techniques, and the admissibility of the results in evidence; (3) the analysis of trace evidence including glass, soil, hair, fibers, gunpowder residues and bullet fragments; (4) forensic toxicology and pharmacology are applied to the analysis of alcohol, poisons, and drugs; and (5) the characterization of blood and other body fluids. The cases which stimulate the exploration of these areas include: the O.J. Simpson case, the John Kennedy assassination, the Jeffery Lindberg baby kidnapping, and the Tylenol poisonings. Not applicable as a Chemistry elective for students majoring or minoring in chemistry.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 3140 - Drugs and Drug Abuse
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the current and historical patterns of alcohol, drug use, abuse, and control. Emphasis will be given to the patterns of usage, way these drugs affect body and types of rehabilitation centers. See CRIM 3242. Not applicable as a Chemistry elective for students majoring or minoring in Chemistry.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 3310K - Analytical Chemistry
Credits: 4.00
This course emphasizes skills needed for a student to function as a professional analytical chemist. The student will be firmly grounded in the areas of gravimetric and volumetric analysis, equilibria, quantitative spectroscopy, electrochemistry and chromatography. Special emphases will be placed on writing skills.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1212K Minimum Grade: C ) and MATH 1634 Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 3422 - Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.00
The second course will systematically explore reactions of carbon-containing compounds and the mechanistic pathways involved in these processes. Reactions that will be discussed include functional group transformations, oxidation, reductions, cyclo-additions and carbon-carbon bond formation. The course begins to teach the student how to systematically design a multi-step synthesis of complex organic compounds. CHEM 3422L may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: CHEM 2411 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 3422L


CHEM 3422L - Organic Chemistry II Lab
Credits: 1.00
Emphasis of this laboratory will be on synthesis and characterization of organic substances will be included.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 3422


CHEM 3510 - Survey of Physical Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
This course is a survey course for students who do not need the more rigorous full-year sequence in physical chemistry. The course includes thermodynamics, chemical and phase equilibria, electrochemistry, kinetics and other topics in physical chemistry.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1212K Minimum Grade: C ) and ( MATH 1634 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( PHYS 1112 Minimum Grade: C or PHYS 2212 Minimum Grade: C )


CHEM 3521 - Quantum Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
This course is an introduction to elementary quantum mechanics and its applications to selected chemical systems. Topics include an introduction to operators, 'particle in a box', harmonic oscillator, atomic structure, chemical bonding, atomic spectroscopy, rotational, vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of small molecules, and elementary statistical mechanics. MATH 2664 or MATH 3303 may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C and PHYS 2212 Minimum Grade: C and MATH 2644 Minimum Grade: C and MATH 2654


CHEM 3522 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Credits: 3.00
This course develops standard topics in classical physical chemistry, with primary emphasis on chemical thermodynamics. The course includes physical and chemical properties of real and ideal gases, the law of thermodynamics and their application to physical and chemical systems, chemical and phase equilibria, kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics, transport properties, and the application of quantum mechanics to thermodynamics in statistical mechanics. MATH 2654 or MATH 3303 may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: ( ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1212L Minimum Grade: C ) or CHEM 1212K Minimum Grade: C ) and ( PHYS 2212 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( MATH 2644 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( MATH 2654 or MATH 3303 )


CHEM 3523 - Structure, Bonding, & Reactivi
Credits: 3.00
This course applies wave-mechanical models of bound electrons to account for the electronic structure of atoms via orbital theory and how it is used to explain the similarities/differences in the behavior of various elements in the periodic table. This is followed by the building of numerous molecular systems via applying Molecular Orbital Theory with Group Symmetry. Orbital theory will be applied in interpreting/predicting the electronic interaction with light, chemical reactivity, and kinetic behavior in reaction mechanisms of various organic molecular systems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: ( PHYS 1112 Minimum Grade: C or PHYS 2212 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 3422 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( MATH 2644 Minimum Grade: C )


CHEM 3550L - Physical Chemistry Lab
Credits: 2.00
In this course, students will demonstrate their understanding of the physical basis and general applications of experimental techniques in physical chemistry. In particular, they will demonstrate their ability in applying the theories from thermodynamics, kinetics, quantum mechanics and spectroscopy to interpret experimental data. They will also learn how to maintain a laboratory notebook - collect data in a professionally acceptable way. Finally, they will demonstrate their ability to communicate their data and results to others. CHEM 3521 or CHEM 3522 may be taken concurrently.
Lab: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3521 or CHEM 3522 or CHEM 3523


CHEM 3810 - Chemical Process Principles
Credits: 3.00
An introductory engineering approach to material and energy balance for physical and chemical processes are developed. Gas behavior, systems of units, material properties, thermophysical and thermochemical concepts are discussed. Emphasis is on the application of material and energy balances to steady and unsteady state physical and chemical processes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1212K Minimum Grade: C ) and MATH 2644 Minimum Grade: C and PHYS 2212 Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 3825 - Research Methods
Credits: 3.00
Specially designed to meet the needs of future teachers, students design and carry out four independent inquiries, which they write up and present in the manner that is common in the scientific community. Course is restricted to UTEACH students.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 3830 - Engineering Thermodynamics
Credits: 3.00
An introductory engineering approach to thermodynamics for physical and chemical processes is developed. Applications of first and second laws, engines, refrigeration and compression cycles, equations of states, fluid properties, corresponding states will be emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: PHYS 2212 Minimum Grade: C and MATH 2644 Minimum Grade: C and ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1212K Minimum Grade: C )


CHEM 3885 - Selected Topics in Chem Engin
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Title and description of course to be specified at time of offering. May be repeated for credit.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 4003 - History & Philos of Science
Credits: 3.00
A study of the historical development of major areas of science and the philosophical examinations of scientific methods and results.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1212K Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 4081 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
A topic is chosen in consultation with a faculty member.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 4083 - Faculty Directed Research
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
A research project carried out under the guidance of a faculty member. Discussion of research areas with the faculty and preliminary work involving literature searching and planning should be completed before the senior year. Both a formal oral and written report of the results of the research must be presented to the faculty of the Department of Chemistry. ACS track students cannot use this as a Chemistry elective. Non-ACS track students can use up to 3 credit hours as a Chemistry elective.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 4084 - Senior Seminar
Credits: 1.00
Restricted to senior chemistry majors. This course is designed to prepare students for oral presentation of chemical research. An oral defense of the students senior research project is required.
Lab: 1.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 4086 - Internship in Chemistry
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Students will secure a position with a company for field experience. May be used for a chemistry elective only by consent of the department.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 4185 - Selected Topics for Teachers
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Course is designed for pre- and in-service teachers. Title and description of course to be specified at time of offering. May be repeated for credit. May be used for major or minor in chemistry only by consent of department.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 4330K - Instrumental Analysis
Credits: 4.00
This is a course designed for chemistry majors that covers the use of instrumentation for chemical analysis. Topics will include optical spectroscopy, NMR, mass spectrometry and selected topics in polarimetry, voltammetry and chromatography. In this class, we will discuss the theory behind the analysis (with a strong emphasis on quantum mechanics and spectroscopy), instrumental operation (that covers the electronics and optical components of instruments), and the data analysis and interpretation (which includes signal processing, Fourier transformation, and statistical analysis). There is a three hour laboratory component to the course. Laboratory exercises will familiarize students with electronics, applications of spectroscopy, chemical instrumentation and data analysis.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 1.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3310K Minimum Grade: C and ( PHYS 2212 Minimum Grade: C or PHYS 1112 Minimum Grade: C ) and MATH 2644 Minimum Grade: C and ( CHEM 3521 or CHEM 3522 or CHEM 3523 )


CHEM 4340 - Surface Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
This course introduces elementary concepts of modern surface chemistry. Considerations of thermodynamics, kinetics, surface structure, electronic structure, and catalysis and reactivity will be explored using examples from the current literature. Surface chemistry, draws upon all areas of chemistry; therefore, a solid background in calculus, physics, and chemistry is assumed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3310K


CHEM 4350L - Techniques of Surface Chem Lab
Credits: 1.00
This laboratory course is designed to familiarize a student to modern techniques of surface science. The technique includes scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, auger electron spectroscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy, and ion sputtering. Design considerations of vacuum systems will be explored. Since all techniques are on-site, this will be a interactive hands on experience.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 4340


CHEM 4385 - Adv Topics in Analytical Chem
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Advanced topics in analytical chemistry provides the student exposure to current topics and problems unique to the field of analytical chemistry. This course will be offered periodically with the topics announced by the faculty involved.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3310K Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 4410 - Organic Medicinal Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
This course covers a wide variety of medicinal drugs, their actions in the body, and ultimately their metabolism and excretion.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3422 Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 4485 - Adv Topics in Organic Chem
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Building upon the students' background in organic chemistry, these courses will explore in greater depth selected advanced topics in organic chemistry. Selected topics such as advanced synthesis, reaction mechanism, molecular orbital theory, spectroscopy, stereochemistry and physical organic chemistry will be offered.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3422 Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 4585 - Advanced Topics Physical Chem
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Building upon the students' background in required courses in physical chemistry, this course will explore in greater depth selected topics in physical chemistry. These will be chosen from atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, statistical mechanics, and dynamics of chemical reactions.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3521 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 3522 Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 4610 - Inorganic Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
The wave nature of electrons is applied to atomic structure and periodic trends. Inter and intramolecular bonding models are used to interpret the chemical and physical properties of various materials, from simplistic diatomic molecules to structurally complex molecular and ionic systems. Thermodynamic principles are used to determine the relative stability of inorganic compounds.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3422 Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 4611 - Structure and Bonding
Credits: 3.00
Fundamental quantum mechanical principles are applied to atomic structure and the periodic properties of the elements. The structure and reactivity of ionic and molecular systems are qualitatively analyzed by using bonding models such as valence bond theory, group symmetry and molecular orbital theory. The Band Theory is used to investigate the insulating/conducting properties of solids.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3422 Minimum Grade: C and ( PHYS 1112 Minimum Grade: C or PHYS 2212 Minimum Grade: C )


CHEM 4612 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
The thermodynamic, kinetic, and quantum mechanical properties of inorganic compounds are investigated. Bonding models are used to explain the physical and chemical properties of organometallic, main group, and heavy metal systems. Nuclear properties of the elements are explored and nuclear models are compared.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3422 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 4611 Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 4685 - Adv Topics in Inorganic Chem
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Advanced topics in inorganic chemistry exposes the students to current topics and problems in the field of inorganic chemistry.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3422 Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 4711 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.00
The first of two semester sequence in biochemistry covering the general physical and chemical properties of biomolecules and the metabolism. Topics will include biomolecular structure and function, first-order enzyme kinetics, glycolysis and carbohydrate metabolism, Kreb's cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid catabolism and biosynthesis, metabolism and utilization of amino acids, biologically important amines and regulation of metabolism.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3422 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 3310K Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 4712 - Physical Biochemistry
Credits: 3.00
Covers bio- chemistry and spectroscopy of biomolecules. Topics include protein folding, protein stability, protein-DNA interactions, physical chemistry of biomembranes, kinetics (beyond first order), molecular mechanics and dynamics, NMR spectroscopy (fluorescence, circular dicroism, laser spectroscopy), mass spectrometry and xray crystallograph.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: ( PHYS 1112 Minimum Grade: C or PHYS 2212 Minimum Grade: C ) and CHEM 3422 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 3310K Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 4720L - Biochemistry Laboratory
Credits: 2.00
The laboratory course will emphasize the principles discussed in the lecture courses Biochemistry I and Biochemistry II. Half of the course will place emphasis on experiments that introduce students to the practices of protein separation, purification, quantification and assays. The other half of the course will emphasize principles from physical biochemistry and spectroscopy of biomolecules. Experiments will examine macromolecular structure and stability; protein folding; lipid bilayer structure and dynamics and enzyme kinetics. This course will provide students with experience in instrumental techniques that are used in research and industrial facilities.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 4711 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 4712 Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 4910L - Tools/Apps in Chem Resr & Prac
Credits: 3.00
Tools and Applications in Chemical Research and Practice is a 3 credit hour laboratory based course that introduces students to a research experience using a series of small-scale, multi-week research modules. This capstone course capitalizes on previous knowledge and skills from multidisciplinary chemistry courses and focuses on a narrow problem in a practical application. Each module begins with skill building activities followed by and in-depth exploration of one aspect of the problem allowing students access to research experiences as part of the mainstream curriculum.
Lecture: 1.00 Lab: 5.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3310K Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 3422 Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 4913L - Advanced Synthesis Lab
Credits: 2.00
This laboratory course involves non-trivial synthesis of organic and inorganic molecules by a variety of advanced techniques (vacuum line, inert atmosphere, high/low temperature, etc.). Spectroscopic (FT-NMR, IR, UV, etc.) and computational methods are used to investigate characterize, and compare experimental and theoretical properties of the synthesized molecules. Special emphasis will be placed on writing skills.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3422 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 4610


CHEM 4920 - Environmental Chemistry
Credits: 4.00
This course is an introduction to the practice of modern environmental chemistry. Topics include pollutants in water, soil, and the atmosphere; equilibria in aqueous systems; experimental methods in environmental analyses; toxicological chemistry; current environmental problems. The laboratory will consist of EPA-approved methods of analyses.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3310K Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 4930 - Chemical Kinetics
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on macroscopic rates of chemical reactions as a tool to a molecular level understanding. The emphasis is on an integrated approach to view examples drawn from various subdisciplines within chemistry, namely organic, inorganic and biological. Topics include integrated rate laws, experimental techniques in chemical kinetics, steady state approximation, mechanisms of organic, inorganic, and enzyme reactions, catalysis, collision theory, and elementary activated complex theory.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3510 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 3521 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 3522 Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 4940 - Industrial Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
Commercial production of everyday and specialty chemicals will be discussed with emphasis on raw materials, chemistry, equipment, environmental impact. Typical industries: inorganic acids/bases, hydrocarbon derivatives, aromatics, petroleum refining, polymers, pesticides/fertilizers, paper/pulp, pharmaceuticals, soaps/detergents.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3422 Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 4985 - Sel Topics:Integrated Approach
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
This course focuses on selected topics in chemistry which may consist of spectroscopy, magnetic resonance or stereo chemistry. The emphasis is on an integrated approach to view examples that transcend sub-disciplines within chemistry, namely inorganic, organic, physical, analytical, and biochemistry.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 3422 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 3310K Minimum Grade: C


CHEM 5003 - History & Philos of Science
Credits: 3.00
A study of the historical development of major areas of science and the philosophical examinations of scientific methods and results.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5081 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
A topic is chosen in consultation with a faculty member.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5083 - Faculty Directed Research
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
A research project carried out under the guidance of a faculty member. Discussion of research areas with the faculty and preliminary work involving literature searching and planning should be completed before the senior year. Both a formal oral and written report of the results of the research must be presented to the faculty of the Department of Chemistry.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5330 - Instrumental Analysis
Credits: 3.00
This course will familiarize the student to considerations of modern instrument design and applications. The physical basis of such techniques as optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, NMR, laser spectroscopes, and electron spectroscopes. Analog and digital electronics will be introduced.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5340 - Surface Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
This course introduces elementary concepts of modern surface chemistry. Considerations of thermodynamics, kinetics, surface structure, electronic structure, and catalysis and reactivity will be explored using examples from the current literature. Surface chemistry draws upon all areas of chemistry; therefore, a solid background in calculus, physics, and chemistry is assumed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5350L - Techniques of Surface Chem Lab
Credits: 1.00
This laboratory course is designed to familiarize a student to modern techniques of surface science. The technique includes scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, auger electron spectroscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy, and ion sputtering. Design considerations of vacuum systems will be explored. Since all techniques are on-site, this will be an interactive hands-on experience.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5385 - Adv Topics in Analytical Chem
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Advanced topics in analytical chemistry provides the student exposure to current topics and problems unique to the field of analytical chemistry. This course will be offered periodically with the topics announced by the faculty involved.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5410 - Organic Medicinal Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
Organic Medical Chemistry, prerequisite Organic II, is a course covering a wide variety of medicinal drugs, their actions in the body, and ultimately their metabolism and excretion.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5422 - Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.00
The second course will systematically explore reactions of carbon-containing compounds and the mechanistic pathways involved in these processes. Reactions that will be discussed include functional group transformations, oxidation, reductions, cycloadditions and carbon-carbon bond formation. The course begins to teach the student how to systematically design a multi-step syntheses of complex organic compounds.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5422L - Organic Chemistry Lab II
Credits: 1.00
Emphasis of this laboratory will be on synthesis. Characterization of organic substances will be included.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5485 - Adv Topics in Organic Chem
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Building upon the students' background in organic chemistry, these courses will explore in greater depth selected advanced topics in organic chemistry. Selected topics such as advanced synthesis, reaction mechanism, molecular orbital theory, spectroscopy, stereochemistry and physical organic chemistry will be offered.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5521 - Physical Chemistry I
Credits: 3.00
This course is an introduction to elementary quantum mechanics and its applications to selected chemical systems. Topics include an introduction to operators, 'particle in a box', harmonic oscillator, atomic structure, chemical bonding, atomic spectroscopy, rotational, vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of small molecules, and elementary statistical mechanics.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5522 - Physical Chemistry II
Credits: 3.00
This course develops standard topics in classical physical chemistry, with primary emphasis on chemical thermodynamics. The course includes physical and chemical properties of real and ideal gases, the law of thermodynamics and their application to physical and chemical systems, chemical and phase equilibria, kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics, transport properties, and the application of quantum mechanics to thermodynamics in statistical mechanics.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5585 - Adv Topics Physical Chemistry
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Building upon the students' background in required courses in physical chemistry, this course will explore in greater depth selected topics in physical chemistry. These will be chosen from atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, statistical mechanics, and dynamics of chemical reactions.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5610 - Inorganic Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
The wave nature of electrons is applied to atomic structure and periodic trends. Inter and intramolecular bonding models are used to interpret the chemical and physical properties of various materials, from simplistic diatomic molecules to structurally complex molecular and ionic systems. Thermodynamic principles are used to determine the relative stability of inorganic compounds.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5611 - Structure and Bonding
Credits: 3.00
Fundamental quantum mechanical principles are applied to atomic structure and the periodic properties of the elements. The structure and reactivity of ionic and molecular systems are qualitatively analyzed by using bonding models such as valence bond theory, group symmetry and molecular orbital theory. The Band Theory is used to investigate the insulating/conducting properties of solids.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5612 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
The thermodynamic, kinetic, and quantum mechanical properties of inorganic compounds are investigated. Bonding models are used to explain the physical and chemical properties of organometallic, main group, and heavy metal systems. Nuclear properties of the element are explored and nuclear models are compared.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5685 - Adv Top in Inorganic Chemistry
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Advanced topics in inorganic chemistry exposes the students to current topics and problems in the field of inorganic chemistry.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5711 - Biochemistry I
Credits: 3.00
The first of two semester sequence in biochemistry covering the general physical and chemical properties of biomolecules, and the metabolism. Topics will include biomolecular structure and function, first-order enzyme kinetics, glycolysis and carbohydrate metabolism, Kreb's cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid catabolism and biosynthesis, metabolism and utilization of amino acids, biologically important amines and regulation of metabolism.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5712 - Biochemistry II
Credits: 3.00
The second semester of a two semester sequence in biochemistry. Course will cover topics in physical biochemistry and spectroscopy of biomolecules. Specific topics will include protein folding, protein stability, protein-DNA interactions, physical chemistry of biomembranes, kinetics (beyond first order), molecular mechanics and dynamics, NMR spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy (florescence, circular dicroism, laser spectroscopy), mass spectrometry and xray crystallography.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5720L - Biochemistry Laboratory
Credits: 2.00
The laboratory course will emphasize the principles discussed in the lecture courses Biochemistry I and Biochemistry II. Half of the course will place emphases on experiments that introduce students to the practices of protein separation, purification, quantification, and assays. The other half of the course will emphasize principles from physical biochemistry and spectroscopy of biomolecules. Experiments will examine macromolecular structure and stability, protein folding, lipid bilayer structure, and dynamics and enzyme kinetics. This course will provide students with experience in instrumental techniques that are used in research and industrial facilities.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5785 - Selected Topics for Teachers
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Course is designed for pre- and in-service teachers. Title and description of course to be specified at time of offering. May be repeated for credit. May be used for major or minor credit in chemistry only with consent of department.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5885 - Sel Top - Chemical Engineering
Credits: 3.00
Title and description of course to be specified at time of offering. May be repeated for credit.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5920 - Environmental Chemistry
Credits: 4.00
This course is an introduction to the practice of modern environmental chemistry. Topics include pollutants in water, soil, and the atmosphere; equilibria in aqueous systems; experimental methods in environmental analyses; toxicological chemistry; current environmental problems. The laboratory will consist of EPA-approved methods of analyses.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 6.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5930 - Chemical Kinetics
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on macroscopic rates of chemical reactions as a tool to a molecular level understanding. The emphasis is on an integrated approach to view examples drawn from various subdisciplines within chemistry, namely organic, inorganic and biological. Topics include integrated rate laws, experimental techniques in chemical kinetics, steady state approximation, mechanisms of organic, inorganic and enzyme reactions, catalysis, collision theory, and elementary activated complex theory.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5940 - Industrial Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
Commercial production of everyday and specialty chemicals will be discussed with emphasis on raw materials, chemistry, equipment, environmental impact. Typical industries: inorganic acids/bases, hydrocarbon derivatives, aromatics, petroleum refining, polymers, pesticides/fertilizers, paper/pulp, pharmaceuticals, soaps/detergents.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


CHEM 5985 - Sel Top: Integrated Approach
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
This course focuses on selected topics in chemistry which may consist of spectroscopy, magnetic resonance or stereo chemistry. The emphasis is on an integrated approach to view examples that transcend sub-disciplines within chemistry, namely inorganic, organic, physical, analytical, and biochemistry.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry



Curriculum and Instruction

Curriculum and Instruction


CIED 7601 - Course Mgmt Sys for E-Learn
Credits: 3.00
Course offered in partnership with VSU as part of the GOML/MATC Program. The study and ethical practice of facilitating online learning through integrated course management systems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership & Instruction


CIED 7602 - Resources & Strat for E-Learn
Credits: 3.00
Course offered in partnership with Valdosta State University as part of the GOML/MATC Program. Practical experiences in selection, implementation, and evaluation of digital resources and strategies for teaching and learning.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership & Instruction



Computer Information Systems

Computer Information Systems


CISM 2201 - Fund of Computer Applications
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to management information systems that focuses on emerging technologies and examines how programs such as Microsoft Office can be used in making business decisions. There is a heavy emphasis on Excel as students format and modify worksheets, use advanced formulas, and create charts and pivot tables. Requires overall GPA of 2.0.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management
Pre-requisites: GPA 2.00 or above required 2.0


CISM 3330 - Management of Information Sys
Credits: 3.00
This course introduces students to the study of organizations as systems supported by information processing. Students will be able to distinguish needs for information at different levels in organizations. They will be able to evaluate information system decisions. They will analyze business information problems using formal methods.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management
Pre-requisites: CISM 2201 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


CISM 3335 - Bus Programming & Web Design
Credits: 3.00
This course introduces students to basic programming and web page design. Specific emphasis will be placed on introducing students to web development applications, content management systems, and programming languages.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management
Pre-requisites: CISM 2201 Minimum Grade: D and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


CISM 3340 - Data Resr Management & Design
Credits: 3.00
Application of development tools and languages (e.g., DBMS, Visual Basic, etc.) for business problem solving in a database environment.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management
Pre-requisites: CISM 3335 Minimum Grade: C and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


CISM 3350 - Networking Research and Cert.
Credits: 3.00
This course introduces students to basic research concepts. Additionally, students demonstrate their ability to recognize and understand emerging MIS-related technology.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: CISM 3330 Minimum Grade: C and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


CISM 4310 - Bus Systems Analysis & Design
Credits: 3.00
Develop knowledge for business systems analysis and design processes including familiarization with tools and techniques of SA/D and development of problem solving skills.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management
Pre-requisites: CISM 3330 Minimum Grade: C and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


CISM 4330 - Enterprise Architecture
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the theoretical and practical issues related to Enterprise Architecture (EA). EA is the organizing structure for business processes and IT infrastructure. Top performing organizations know how to design their business processes and IT infrastructure for success of their current operations, and the most successful companies know how to expand their EA to enable innovation and to seize a competitive advantage for the future. This course will introduce students to EA concepts and will equip students with design thinking tools and knowledge needed to extend an organization’s EA. Specific emphasis will be placed on using SAP enterprise systems design tools. Same as MGNT 4330.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management
Co-requisites: CISM 4310
Pre-requisites: Richard College Upper Division RCUD


CISM 4350 - Enterprise & Decision Supp Sys
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the theoretical and practical issues related to enterprise and decision support systems. Will introduce students to the technologies involved in these systems and will examine the need to share, communicate, and manage organizational information for integration and decision making. Specific emphasis will be placed on using enterprise systems such as Greenway's PrimeSuite or SAP's enterprise system.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management
Pre-requisites: CISM 4310 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


CISM 4355 - Cyber Security
Credits: 3.00
Business and government are facing a rapidly expanding need for information security professionals. This course surveys important skills in information security program design, networking and application security, the development of information security safeguards and information security auditing, disaster recovery, policy development, identity management, and effective threat assessment. This course is only for MIS majors.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management
Pre-requisites: CISM 3330 Minimum Grade: C and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


CISM 4382 - Spcl Prblms in Mgnt Info. Syst
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
In-depth, supervised, individual study of one or more current problems of a business organization.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management
Pre-requisites: Richard College Upper Division RCUD


CISM 4386 - Bus Internship (Mgnt Info Sys)
Credits: 1.00 to 6.00
Practical internship experience with a commercial firm or organization for selected junior or senior students. (Students will be given a written agreement specifying course credit hours and grading system to be used).
Lab: 1.00 to 6.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management
Pre-requisites: Richard College Upper Division RCUD


CISM 4390 - Business Intel & Data Mining
Credits: 3.00
This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of business intelligence and several data mining software tools that enable organizations to strive for business intelligence.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management
Pre-requisites: ECON 3402 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


CISM 5330 - Enterprise Architecture
Credits: 3.00
Successful organizations use Enterprise Architecture (EA) as a business strategy. EA is the organizing structure for business processes and IT infrastructure. Top performing organizations know how to design their business processes and IT infrastructure for success of their current operations, and the most successful companies know how to expand their EA to enable innovation and to seize a competitive advantage for the future. This course will introduce students to how EA is used as a business strategy and a business enabler. A final research project will include design thinking methods and the use of SAP enterprise systems design tools to extend an organization’s EA. Students who have taken CISM 4330 cannot take CISM 5330.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management


CISM 5355 - Cyber Security
Credits: 3.00
Business and government are facing a rapidly expanding need for information security managers. This course surveys information security program design, networking and application security, the implementation of information security safeguards and information security auditing, disaster recovery, policy development, identity management, and effective threat assessment. Students who have taken CISM 4355 cannot take CISM 5355.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management


CISM 5390 - Bus Intelligence & Data Mining
Credits: 3.00
This course will teach the fundamental concepts of business intelligence and several data mining software tools (SAS Enterprise Miner and SAS Visual Analytics) that enable organizations to strive for business intelligence. The course will be hands-on and the emphasis will be placed on learning how to derive business value from large amounts of data using data mining tools. Students also explore issues and trends in data mining and visualization. Students who have taken CISM 4390 cannot take CISM 5390.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management


CISM 6331 - Strategic Mgmnt of Inform Tech
Credits: 3.00
Focuses on information technology and systems from a general management perspective. Discusses management of the systems development process, the organizational cycle of information, technology, planning, evaluation, selection, and strategic uses of information technology. Includes frequent discussions of industry case studies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management
Pre-requisites: CISM 3330


CISM 6684 - MBA Mgmnt Info System Intern
Credits: 3.00
This course is intended to offer students in the MBA program an internship in the management field. This opportunity affords the student deep learning and insight into business culture, business environment, and work experience. The learning objectives of this course will be realized through a mix of independent research and experiential learning.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Management



Community Wellness

Community Wellness


CMWL 2100 - Intro to Health & Comm Well
Credits: 2.00
This undergraduate course is an introduction to the Health and Community Wellness degree. Through this course, students will discover the many aspects of an undergraduate degree in Health and Community Wellness, including an overview of the classes required, current and future opportunities available with a degree in this field, the potential opportunities, certifications, and work experiences which students can pursue.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: .00 Other: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ


CMWL 2200 - Soc. Determinants Hlth & Well
CEUs: 3.00
This course engages students in critical analyses of contemporary cultural and sociological issues and their interaction on the health and wellness (physical, social, emotional, psychological) of individuals and society as a whole. Students will actively examine contemporary societal issues from multiple vantage points in order to better understand their complexities and the impact they have on the well being of all.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ


CMWL 3100 - Lifespan Development
Credits: 3.00
This undergraduate course is a study of human growth and development from birth through aging and death. The course focuses on areas of physical, cognitive, social, personality, and emotional development as a series of progressive changes resulting from the biological being interacting with the environment. The course will study factors affecting these changes within historical, multicultural, and societal perspectives.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 Other: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ
Pre-requisites: Community Health & Wellness CMWL


CMWL 3101 - Mental & Emotional Wellness
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the role of mental and emotional health in overall well-being. Emphasis is placed on research and practice related to improving mental health and emotional well-being. In addition, barriers to improving mental health are explored at the individual, community, and societal levels. Students are expected to establish and pursue personal goals related to improving emotional health and demonstrate a thorough understanding of the relationship between mental and emotional health and the other pillars of healthful living. Students will also examine common behavioral strategies with regard to substance use and abuse and its management and the use of alternative remedies for physical, mental and emotional dependencies and addictions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ
Pre-requisites: Community Health & Wellness CMWL


CMWL 3102 - Psych of Health & Wellness
Credits: 3.00
Review the science that connects human behaviors and psychological variables to health status. The role of Psychology in disease, injury, premature death, substance abuse, exercise, diet, stress, social relationships, coping behaviors and high level wellness, both to individual and society. Includes interrelatedness of wellness dimensions, healthy and destructive behaviors, managing chronic diseases, psychosocial aspects of final illness and death, and delivery of health services.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ
Pre-requisites: Community Health & Wellness CMWL


CMWL 3110 - Program Eval in Comm Settings
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to prepare students to effectively and efficiently participate in program evaluation in community settings. Students will learn the fundamentals of program evaluation theory, ethics, design, measurement, and data analysis and outline a program evaluation proposal. Students will also examine the issues and practices in planning and conducting program evaluations in community settings. A service learning component of 5 hours is required.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 Other: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ


CMWL 3210 - Healthy Eating and Nutrition
CEUs: 3.00
This undergraduate course provides healthy eating and nutrition principles for fitness and wellness professionals. The course helps students understand the role of nutrition in improving health and applying these ideas to establish healthy SMART goals and eating plans. A review of current eating habits and patterns using nationally recommended dietary guidelines and nutritional assessment tools will be covered. Course topics include the relationship between nutrition and various diseases, use of dietary supplementation, and nutrition for improved sport and fitness performance.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ
Pre-requisites: Community Health & Wellness CMWL or Coaching Minor COAC or Nutrition Minor NUTR


CMWL 3220 - Prnc & Fnd Hlth Prmtn, Ed, Eva
CEUs: 3.00
This undergraduate course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the practical and theoretical skills needed to plan, implement and evaluate health promotion programs in a variety of settings. The course helps students develop a health education program, work through examples and activities for program planning application and review the essential tools for effective practices in health promotion, education and evaluation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ
Pre-requisites: Community Health & Wellness CMWL


CMWL 3230 - Exercise Leadership
CEUs: 3.00
This undergraduate course provides students with leadership skills and experience that directly apply to fitness programs. Topics include current trends in group exercise formats, exercise program design and implementation, methods of intensity monitoring, exercise risk factors, safety issues as they relate to proper alignment and technique, evaluation of existing programs and basic business practices, professional certifications and educational organizations in group fitness instruction.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ
Pre-requisites: Community Health & Wellness CMWL


CMWL 3240 - Cur Iss/Trend in Fit/Well Lead
CEUs: 3.00
This undergraduate course gives students an overview of the current issues and trends in the health, fitness, and wellness industry, by providing quality opportunities for gaining in-depth knowledge of the most relevant topics impacting the field. The course specifically highlights career opportunities and code of conduct for professionals, legal issues and responsibilities, working with special populations, nutrition and weight control, fitness and wellness promotion, current certifications, healthcare, and the business of the industry. Additional content may vary based on recent trends related to epidemiology, exercise and aging, psychology of health and fitness, program adherence, research methods, exercise prescription and assessment, consumer choices, and sport concerns.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ
Pre-requisites: Community Health & Wellness CMWL


CMWL 3401 - Tech in Hlth & Comm Wellness
CEUs: 3.00
In this course, students will reflect on the role various forms of electronic and digital technology can play in the health and community wellness profession and how you can engage these processes with your clients. You will become skilled in using selected digital tools used common in today's health and wellness careers. In addition, you will be exposed to basic theories of communication, methods of delivery, and evaluation. Further, you will learn to determine appropriate applications of these theories and techniques in health promotion settings.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ
Pre-requisites: Community Health & Wellness CMWL


CMWL 4000 - Exer & Well Prog for Spec Pop
Credits: 3.00
Issues related to the appropriation of health interventions (specific physical activity and/or exercise programs) for special populations, including, but not limited to: older adults, children, obesity, diabetes, CVD, cancer, anxiety, depression, osteoporosis, multiple sclerosis, COPD, HIV, organ transplant, PAD, arthritis and musculoskeletal injuries. Evidence-based, advanced programming methods and population-specific considerations will be discussed. ACSM’s Exercise is Medicine initiative will be a focal point for this course.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ
Pre-requisites: Community Health & Wellness CMWL


CMWL 4100 - Wellness Coaching
Credits: 3.00
Develop theory, skills, and techniques related to guiding groups and individuals through meaningful lifestyle changes by emphasizing motivational strategies and behavioral and holistic practices. Motivational interviewing techniques and diverse coaching methodologies will be taught, practiced, and compared and contrasted.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ
Pre-requisites: Community Health & Wellness CMWL


CMWL 4101 - Worksite Wellness Programs
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the principles and practices in workplace wellness. Emphasis is placed on understanding and development of a comprehensive framework for improving employee health and productivity. Students explore the evidence base for ensuring program efficacy and maximizing return on investment. Case studies provide opportunities to understand the range of effective programs and value of needs assessment, support of top management, employee education and behavioral health support, change in organizational culture, and ongoing evaluation and program improvement.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ
Pre-requisites: Community Health & Wellness CMWL


CMWL 4102 - Serv Learn in Hlth & Comm Well
Credits: 3.00
Supervised pre-professional practice experience in health and wellness promotion and coaching. Students will be placed in service learning sites in a range of venues and will receive on-site supervision by a field supervisor as well as seminar meetings with the course instructor.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ
Pre-requisites: Community Health & Wellness CMWL and CMWL 3220


CMWL 4103 - Appld Rsrch Mthd Hlth/Comm Wel
CEUs: 3.00
This course introduces students to the concepts, design, implementation, and interpretation of research in health and community wellness. Students will learn to synthesize existing literature and determine gaps worth researching. Students will learn both quantitative and qualitative research methods through hands on data collection and analysis experience. The course emphasis is for students to prepare and present scholarly research projects to experts and peers in the field. Overall, students will become informed consumers of research and develop an understanding of how research can guide decision making in the field.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ
Pre-requisites: Community Health & Wellness CMWL


CMWL 4685 - Special Topics
Credits: 3.00
Special topics courses in this degree program explore subject areas at the leading edge in this field. Titles and descriptions of specific courses to be inserted at time of offering. Course may be repeated for credit up to 20 times.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Spt Mgt, Wellness & Phys Educ
Pre-requisites: Community Health & Wellness CMWL



Communications

Communications


COMM 1100 - Human Communication
Credits: 3.00
This course is a broad approach to oral communication skills including intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, and public speaking. Students in this course will be expected to participate in discussions on a frequent basis, take 12 short online quizzes, complete a variety of unit assignments and take a proctored final exam. For more information on this institution's ecore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: eCore Introduction Quiz C or eCore Course C


COMM 1110 - Public Speaking
Credits: 3.00
A study of the principles and practice of public speaking with an emphasis on the organization of material and the vocal and physical aspects of delivery in various public speaking situations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications


COMM 1115 - Debate Practicum
Credits: 2.00
Instruction and practice in competitive debate. Emphasis on skills necessary for intercollegiate debate, including research and strategy. Debate team membership is not prerequisite, but the focus is exclusively college debate.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications


COMM 1154 - Intro to Mass Communications
Credits: 3.00
An introductory, yet critical examination of the historical development, and paramount economic, legal/policy, ethical, political, and social effects issues concerned with mass media, i.e., books, newspapers, magazines, recordings, radio, movies, television, the internet, public relations, and advertising. Particular attention given to competition, convergence, and mass media's impact on society, as well as society's impact on mass media.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications


COMM 2254 - Media Ethics
Credits: 3.00
Examination of the major classical and contemporary ethical philosophies. Application of ethical decision-making models to media issues, particularly freedom of speech, economic pressure, invasion of privacy, and the public's rights.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 2285 - Special Topics
Credits: 3.00
Variable topic courses offered on a limited or pilot basis to explore or extend study of select, contemporary mass media and public relations issues.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 2254


COMM 3200 - Rhetoric and Social Influence
CEUs: 3.00
The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of rhetoric in the context of social influence. In addition to identifying key concepts of rhetorical analysis, the course includes evaluation of communicative strategies and tactics of social justice movements. The course also examines the ways in which technological developments – the channels of communication – have altered rhetorical messages, as well as their effectiveness in influencing public opinion and achieving institutional change.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1110 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 1100 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3301 - Writing & Reptg for Newspapers
Credits: 3.00
Basic procedures and techniques for writing and reporting for newspapers. Emphasis on news style and judgment as well as ethical and legal issues.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3302 - Public Affairs Reporting
Credits: 3.00
This writing-intensive course builds upon the student’s basic skills attained in COMM3301, Writing & Reporting for Newspapers. Public Affairs Reporting concerns coverage of government and community events such as city council meetings, hearings, and press conferences. The course also includes writing for beats, editorials, columns and reviews.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 3301 and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3303 - Layout and Design
Credits: 3.00
Basic editing and makeup procedures for newspapers and other print publications. Includes copy editing, headline writing, page makeup, and basic graphic principles.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3305 - Short-Form Screenwr & Analysis
Credits: 3.00
This is a writing workshop where students will investigate various story-telling styles, structures and techniques, and implement these analyses in the development of stories written for the screen. Students will also engage with marketing and promotional texts within the field.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3310 - Persuasion
Credits: 3.00
Theories and inquiry into strategies for the creation of and ethical use of persuasive messages including historical and contemporary perspectives in various communication contexts. Special focus on oral presentation of persuasive content and analysis of ethical persuasive strategies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1110 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 1100 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3313 - Public Relations Principles
Credits: 3.00
A survey of the role, responsibilities, and potential of modern public relations. Includes developement of basic techniques needed for effective public relations programs.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3320 - Small Group Communication
CEUs: 3.00
This course will teach students to more effectively communicate in small group settings, understand the dynamics involved in group discussions, and to learn and apply group communication theories.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1110 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 1100 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3330 - Advanced Communication Skills
Credits: 3.00
Analysis and application of interpersonal, small-group, and mediated communication skills as effective speaking, listening, negotiation, conflict management, presentation, and media interviewing.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1110 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 1100 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3340 - Advanced Interpersonal Communi
CEUs: 3.00
This theory-driven course will analyze verbal and nonverbal communication in person-to-person relationships, paying special attention to the stages of relationship development and dissolution, conflict management strategies, identity development, and the role of power and perception.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1110 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 1100 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3350 - Telecom & Electr Media Industr
Credits: 3.00
A continuation of COMM 1154, examining contemporary industry and social issues facing telecommunication and electronic media. Particular attention given to analysis of structure and process, revenue sources, programming and services, audience research, and effects.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3351 - Radio Program Production
Credits: 3.00
Instruction in the operation of radio technology and introduction to the production of radio programs. Opportunity for practical experience with the university radio station.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3352 - Fund of TV Production
Credits: 3.00
Instruction in the operation of television studio and digital video technology and introduction to the production of television and digital video messages. Emphasis on electronic newsgathering, television studio production, and digital video editing techniques.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3353 - Fundmntls Film & Video Prodctn
Credits: 3.00
Fundamental techniques in producing, scripting, shooting, directing and editing film and video projects, with an emphasis on single camera narrative production for independent distribution.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3354 - Digital Social Media & Society
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the foundations, applications, and techniques of digital social media. Opportunities for practical experience developing blogs and other social media content, and exploring the relation of these emerging technologies to traditional mass communication media within society.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3355 - Media Programming & Mgmt
Credits: 3.00
Expounds upon principles discussed in COMM 3350 - Telecommunications and Electronic Media Industries, and offers an in-depth examination of the historical, legal, and professional practices involved in programming and managing the electronic media. Emphasis will focus on the processes of selecting, scheduling, promoting, and evaluating programming for commercial radio and television networks and stations, cable television, public radio and television, and online. Moreover, management issues and programming terminology, strategies, and economics will be discussed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 3350


COMM 3356 - Film and Culture
Credits: 3.00
A study of the evolution and significance of the motion picture as a specialized form of artistic experience and as a form of Mass Communication.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3357 - Diversity & Mass Media
Credits: 3.00
Survey and critical analysis of scholarship concerned with the relationship between mass media, public relations, and selected populaces who have been given peripheral attention, i.e., minorities, women, lower socioeconomic class, and those who are aging or have physical disabilities. Emphasis on the cultural impact of media and public relations in terms of representations, audience effects, and industry demographics, as well as media literacy and advocacy.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3360 - Intercultural Communication
CEUs: 3.00
This course will analyze the communication process in intercultural contexts, including self-awareness of our intersecting cultural identities, listening, verbal and nonverbal styles across cultures, culture shock, and communication values in intercultural dialogue.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1110 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 1100 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 3366 - The Business of Film
CEUs: 3.00
This course will provide students with an understanding of how films, from blockbusters to micro-budgets, are developed, financed, marketed and distributed both inside and outside established circuits of audiovisual trade.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4200 - Communication and Gender
CEUs: 3.00
This course will survey the role of gender in various communication contexts: relationships, organizations, educational institutions, and mass media. Consideration will be given to the social construction of categories of gender, race, sexuality, and class and how they have changed over time.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1110 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 1100 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4210 - Communication and Conflict
CEUs: 3.00
This course will examine communication principles that address how to manage conflicts productively in interpersonal and organizational contexts. Consideration will be given to the role that goals, power, and conflict management styles play in conflict interactions, as well as the potential for third-party interventions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1110 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 1100 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4220 - Health Communication
CEUs: 3.00
This course will introduce students to health communication theory, research, and practice in a variety of health communication contexts, such as patient-provider communication, public health communication, health campaigns, and communication in healthcare organizations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1110 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 1100 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4402 - Feature Writing
Credits: 3.00
Application and analysis of techniques for writing magazine and newspaper features and commentaries.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 3301 and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4403 - Photojournalism
Credits: 3.00
A study of the history, techniques and importance of photographs for the print media, along with their evolving role in convergent and online media, including analysis of the aesthetic and social impact of photographs. Practice in the production of documentary photographs appropriate for print and online news delivery, as well as the photographic essay, using digital photography and digital editing tools.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4405 - Sound Design
Credits: 3.00
This workshop-based skills course explores the communicative uses of sound in audio-visual media, with an emphasis on early and deliberate decision-making about what listeners hear. A number of technically-driven creative skills projects are supported by an examination of the history of sound recording practices, the origins and development of the field of sound design, and critical listening and viewing exercises.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C and ( COMM 3351 or COMM 3352 or COMM 3353 )


COMM 4406 - Digital Cinema & Image Design
Credits: 3.00
This workshop-based skills course explores the communicative potential of the moving image. Students will analyze and practice deliberate strategies of image-making to produce intended effects for viewers. Through critical viewing and analysis, reading, skills exercises and a number of technically-driven creative projects, students will develop the expressive resources of the moving image for a broad use in audio-visual media.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C and ( COMM 3352 or COMM 3353 )


COMM 4407 - Film & Video Post-Production
Credits: 3.00
Students will work with the various aspects of film and video editing, synthesizing technology, creative storytelling, visual effects, motion graphics and sound editing, along with digital distribution formats and strategies.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C and ( COMM 3352 or COMM 3353 )


COMM 4408 - Producing for Film and Video
CEUs: 3.00
From the discovery of creative content to the technical demands of the position, students will learn the ins and outs of producing in every phase of production, from development to distribution.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 3353 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 3305 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4409 - Directing for Film &Video Prod
CEUs: 3.00
Students will build the vocabulary, conceptual framework, and practical skills necessary for directing audio-visual works. These include the ability to analyze and discuss shot progression, camera movement, and on-screen performance, as well as developing a deeper understanding of production practices and cinema as a visual language.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 3353 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 3305 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4413 - Public Relations Cases
Credits: 3.00
Analysis of public relations cases and situations. Includes analysis of application of principles, processes, and theories of public relations to case management.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 3313 and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4414 - Public Relations Management
Credits: 3.00
Public Relations Management provides students insights regarding key concepts, theoretical perspectives, essential skills and abilities, and critical thinking and problem solving skills necessary for effective communication within an organization and with its stakeholders. Topics include issues management, risk management, relationship management, crisis planning and preparation, case studies, and developing communication plans.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 3313 and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4421N - Practicum-The West Georgian
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Practical experience with the campus newspaper, The West Georgian, that primarily includes general and specialty news writing and reporting on deadline, editorial decision-making, interviewing, copy editing, photojournalism, and layout and design across traditional and emerging digital media platforms. Emphasis is placed on news style and judgment, localization, and ethical and legal issues. Repeatable; Maximum of 3.0 credits hours may be applied to the Mass Communications major.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 3301 and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4421P - Prac: Blueston Pub Rela Firm
Credits: 3.00
Practical experience with the student-managed public relations firm that primarily includes hands-on experience through service learning and experiential learning projects for private, nonprofit, and public sector clients. Emphasis is placed on strategic planning, research, data analysis, campaign development, copywriting, promotional design, and use of social media across traditional and digital media platforms. Repeatable; Maximum of 3.0 credit hours may be applied to the Mass Communications major.
Lecture: 1.00 Lab: 4.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 3313 and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 4451 and ( COMM 4414 or COMM 4484 or COMM 4413 )


COMM 4421R - Prac-The WOLF Internet Radio
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Practical experience with the campus radio station, The WOLF Internet Radio, that primarily includes editing, management, on-air experience, producing, programming, promotions, production, and remotes across traditional and emerging digital media platforms. Repeatable; Maximum of 3.0 credit hours may be applied to the Mass Communications major.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 3351 and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4421T - Practicum - WUTV
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Practical experience with the campus television station, WUTV, that primarily includes anchoring, directing, editing, field and studio camera operation, news gathering, producing, reporting, scripting, studio and field production, and switching across traditional and emerging digital media platforms.
Lab: 2.00 to 6.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 3352


COMM 4425 - Documentary Production Practic
Credits: 3.00
Part film-production workshop and part study in film-history and aesthetics – this skills-based class explores through action the methods, strategies, tools, and processes of non-fiction film communication.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 3353 Minimum Grade: C and ( COMM 4405 or COMM 4406 or COMM 4407 )


COMM 4426 - Fiction Film Production
Credits: 3.00
Students will form the crew that will handle all aspects of production in this industry-modeled film production workshop. This hands-on production experience will cover the art and craft of producing works of fiction for visual media, including project development, set etiquette, crew hierarchy, set safety, on-screen blocking, staging, and teamwork.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 3305 and COMM 3353 and ( COMM 4405 or COMM 4406 or COMM 4407 )


COMM 4444 - Public Relations Campaigns
Credits: 3.00
This public relations capstone course applies knowledge and skills learned in previous public relations courses in the planning, execution, and evaluation of a client campaign. Provides students the opportunity to gain a positive client evaluation and a quality product to use in their portfolios.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 4414 and COMM 4451 and COMM 3313 and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4450 - Broadcast News Wrtng & Rprting
Credits: 3.00
Coaching and practice in gathering, writing, and reporting television and radio news under deadline. Particular attention given to news style and judgment as well as aesthetic, ethical, and legal issues. Ability to shoot and edit field video is required.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 3352 and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4451 - Public Relations Writing
Credits: 3.00
A study and application of principles and techniques for writing across traditional and emerging digital media platforms. Emphasis on informational and persuasive writing for public relations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 3301 and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4452 - Adv Film & Video Production
Credits: 3.00
Direct involvement with the scripting, planning, producing, direction and post-production of film, television, or video programs under the supervision of the instructor. Emphasis on the advanced creative, organizational and managerial aspects of film, television, and video production.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 3305 and COMM 3353 and ( COMM 4405 or COMM 4406 or COMM 4407 )


COMM 4454 - Media Law
Credits: 3.00
Examination of the legal context regulating print, telecommunication and electronic media as well as advertising and public relations industries. Emphasis on libel, slander, privacy, copyright, free press/fair trial and obscenity law. This course is restricted to Seniors.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 2254 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4455 - Critical Issues in Mass Comm
Credits: 3.00
Exploration and analysis of critical, contemporary issues concerned with the relationship between mass media and society. Emphasis on critical, creative, and collaborative thinking to reach considered judgments and position students to be media literate, responsible, and responsive 21st century mass media and public relations professionals.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4481 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Variable topic courses offered on an individual basis to explore or extend study of specialized mass media and public relations scholarship. Students must collaborate with instructor to outline learning objectives, and curriculum to achieve them.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications


COMM 4484 - Mass Comm Research Methods
Credits: 3.00
A survey of qualitative and quantitative research methods, data analysis and reporting procedures, including opportunities to conduct, analyze, evaluate, interpret, and communicate research.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4485 - Special Topics
Credits: 3.00
Variable topic courses offered on a limited or pilot basis to explore or extend study of select, contemporary mass media and public relations issues.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications


COMM 4486 - Internship
Credits: 3.00
A hands-on, supervised, media field experience to apply and test knowledge and skills, and to network with professionals. Internship must be approved by internship coordinator. To be approved, internship must offer experiential learning in Convergence Journalism, Digital Media & Telecommunication, Film & Video Production, and/or Public Relations; require majors to intern 45 hours for each credit hour enrolled or 135 hours if enrolled 3 credit hours; assign interns an immediate supervisor who has academic credentials and professional experience in the discipline. Additional Prerequisites: Major; Junior or Senior; minimum of nine credit hours of COMM 3000-4000 level courses; and Major GPA of 2.5 or above. Permission of the Instructor is required.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 4600 - Communication Theory
CEUs: 3.00
This course will explore a variety of theoretical approaches to human communication from multiple paradigms of thought, including selected theories of language, interpersonal communication, small group interaction, organizational communication, intercultural communication, race, gender, and persuasion.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications
Pre-requisites: COMM 1110 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 1100 Minimum Grade: C


COMM 5585 - Special Topics in Communicatio
CEUs: 1.00 to 4.00
Special topics in communication at the graduate level. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Mass Communications



Criminology

Criminology


CRIM 1100 - Intro to Criminal Justice
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an overview of the criminal justice system in the United States. Topics covered include definitions and measures of crime, fear of crime, victims of crime, law enforcement, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 2000 - Survey of Criminology
Credits: 3.00
This course will provide an overview of issues and controversies in criminology. In addition to a survey of the major criminological series, the course concentrates on the major types of crimes committed in America society. Additionally, students will be exposed to how major societal institutions impact upon crime control efforts. Finally, problems associated with the measurement of crime are considered.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 2245 - Juvenile Delinquency
Credits: 3.00
This course will examine the types and patterns of juvenile delinquency and the social and institutional context within which delinquency occurs. Major theories of delinquency will be presented. The juvenile justice system will be discussed with a focus on historical changes and contemporary challenges.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 2272 - Intro to Law Enforcement
Credits: 3.00
Law enforcement in America will be examined at the federal, state and local levels. The history of law enforcement, the structure and functions of law enforcement agencies and the role of police in society will be covered. In addition, the course will explore the management of police and the challenges facing police administrators.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 2273 - Criminal Procedure
Credits: 3.00
Criminal Procedure covers the major U.S. Supreme Court decisions regarding law enforcement. These cases provide the boundaries which facilitate as well as limit the actions of law enforcement officers in such activities as: 'stop and frisk', arrest, questioning, surveillance, vehicle stops and searches, as well as search and seizures which yield evidence admissible at trial. Also emphasizes legal reasoning and interpretation as well as the fundamental elements of case briefing and jurisdiction.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 2274 - American Criminal Courts
Credits: 3.00
This course introduces students to the history, traditions, and philosophy of criminal courts in America. It focuses on the organizational structures of the courts at the local, state, and federal levels. Students will learn about the various legal actors(e.g., judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys) and the roles they play in the courtroom. Finally, this course examines the nature of criminal law and the procedures that must be followed when defendants enter the judicial system from arraignment to sentencing.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 2275 - Introduction to Corrections
Credits: 3.00
Corrections in America will be examined at the federal, state and local levels. The history of incarceration, the structure and functions of jails, prisons, and community corrections and the role of corrections in society will be covered.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 2276 - Global Crime and Justice
Credits: 3.00
As we look around the world, we witness a vast array of individual, corporate, and state criminal activity that is varied in its scope, intensity, and effect upon society. The amount and variety of global crime is immense, and in order to fully appreciate its dimensions, we must impose certain definitions and perspectives. Two of the most important variables to understand are the influences of culture and globalization on the causes and responses to crime around the world. Although it may be difficult to comprehend why such crime persists decade after decade, the search for these answers uncovers a challenging and fascinating tapestry of criminal activity.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 3240 - Criminological Theory
Credits: 3.00
An overview of the major historical developments in criminological theory, with an emphasis on basic assumptions, concepts, and propositions of criminological theories of crime.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 2000


CRIM 3241 - Corrections
Credits: 3.00
A study of the past, present, and future trends, issues and philosophies of corrections. Particular emphasis will be placed on the issues and concerns of the maximum security prison.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 3242 - Drug Abuse
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the current and historical patterns of alcohol and drug use, abuse, and control. Strong emphasis will be given to patterns of usage and types and kinds of programs used by helping agencies in the rehabilitation process. Same as CHM 3140.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 3323 - Criminal Law
Credits: 3.00
Covers the fundamental elements of criminal law such as mens rea and actus reus as well as crimes such as murder, burglary, assault and battery. Significant cases and articles on historically well-established crimes will be examined as will some of the contemporary and more controversial crimes or instances of crime. Legal reasoning interpretative skills will be emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 3333 - Victimology
Credits: 3.00
Provides an in-depth analysis of the victims of crime. This course focuses on the historical development of victimology, which emerged in the 1940's as an independent field of study as well as surveying some of the more recent works by contemporary thinkers.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 3411 - Criminal Investigations
Credits: 3.00
This course examines the basic principles of criminal investigation. Coverage includes study of current investigative procedures used in handling of crime scenes, interviews, evidence, surveillance, report writing, modus operandi, and technical resources. In addition, this course explores theories, philosophies, and concepts related to prevention, apprehension, and suppression of crimes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 3705 - Criminal Profiling
Credits: 3.00
Examines sociological and psychological evidence that can be useful in the context of criminal investigations. Explores the types of questions that profiling attempts to answer; the aspects of crimes, crime scenes, and criminals that profilers are interested in; and, the general types of information often contained within criminal profiles. Concludes by looking at specific types of crimes for which profilers are sometimes employed, including sociological and psychological characteristics of serial arsonists, rapists, and murders.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 3900 - Socl Sci. within the Legal Sys
Credits: 3.00
Critically examines the relationships between the social sciences and the legal system with particular attention to the participation of mental health professionals in the resolution of legal issues. Analyzes select socio-legal controversies that lie at the forefront of this emerging interdisciplinary relationship. Specific topics addressed include: the prediction of dangerousness; competency to stand trial, be executed, represent oneself, and refuse treatment; the insanity defense; jury selection; jury decision-making; eyewitness testimony and accuracy concerns; and the testimony of children in court.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 3983 - Directed Criminology Research
Credits: 3.00
This course provides students the opportunity to engage in faculty-directed research by working on an independent project or by working as an assistant to a faculty member. May be taken twice for credit toward the degree.
Other: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 4000 - Research Methodology
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the logic and procedures of quantitative and qualitative research methods. Focuses on research design, use of computer and statistical packages, date interpretation, the relation of research and theory, and the writing of scientific research reports.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4001 - Survey Research Mthds
Credits: 3.00
This course will introduce one of the most common research methods used in the field of criminology: the survey. Topics covered will include sampling, modes of conducting surveys, question wording, and dealing with non-response. In the later part of the semester, students will gain practical knowledge of the topic by conducting live telephone interviews.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4003 - Statistics for Social Sciences
Credits: 3.00
Provides a systematic, precise, and rational perspective based on probability theory. Learn descriptive and inferential statistics and computer application of statistical packages. Same as PSYC 4003 and SOCI 4003.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4004 - Managing Data
Credits: 3.00
CRIM 4004 Managing Data 3/0/3 This course teaches students to build and manage databases using SPSS. An emphasis is placed on working with large national data sets, including those available through the U.S. Census Bureau and the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research. Although a basic understanding of research methods and statistics is helpful, it is not necessary for this course. PRE-REQUISITES: CRIM 1100
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4200 - Violent Crime
Credits: 3.00
This class provides an overview of violent crime in America. It will offer the student readings which incorporate research on violence, theoretical causes of violent crime, and the application of current knowledge to social policy. Course topics include the patterns of violent crime, theoretical explanations of violence, prevention of violent crime, and the punishment/treatment of violent offenders.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4211 - Police Deviance
Credits: 3.00
The main focus of this course is on examining a variety of contemporary issues in police deviance. Controversies have arisen regarding officer misconduct, racial profiling, excessive use of force and noble cause corruption. The controversies provide a context for studying the ethics of police deviance.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4230 - Ethics & Criminal Justice
Credits: 3.00
Focuses on major moral theories and ethical decision making in the field of criminal justice. Conflicting loyalties, competing social demands, and subcultural strains specific to criminal justice will be explored.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4231 - Women & Criminal Justice
Credits: 3.00
This course will introduce students to the participation of women in the criminal justice system. Offenses committed by females, laws peculiar to females, and the treatment of females by the system will be explored. Women as professionals and their impact on the system will also be discussed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4232 - Family Violence
Credits: 3.00
This course will examine family violence from both a personal and social perspective. Research and theory in family violence will be discussed, along with types of relationships, incidence, prevalence, inter-personal dynamics, contributing factors, consequences, social response and services. Prevention strategies will be explored.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4233 - Gangs
Credits: 3.00
This course will examine the history of youth gangs in the U.S. and how gangs have changed over time. Students will learn about contemporary gangs and their activities, why youths join gangs and how gangs relate to the larger society.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4248 - International Compar Justice
Credits: 3.00
An interdisciplinary course which looks at the justice systems of such countries as: England, France, China, Japan, South Africa and the Islamic States as well as a brief look at the history of the Western Legal Tradition. Comparisons are made for the purpose of answering such questions as: What do the various notions of justice entail? How do they differ? Why? How are they enframed by their philosophical and belief systems? How do the outcomes of their applications of justice differ?
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4250 - Crime Prevention
Credits: 3.00
This course will examine the roles of the criminal justice system and the private sector in preventing crime. The historical developments of crime prevention methodologies including: community involvement, education, and awareness programs, governmental intervention, target hardening, and environmental design will be discussed and their impacts will be critically assessed. In addition, students will be introduced to contemporary crime prevention strategies and the techniques for evaluating prevention programs.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4255 - Youth, Crime and Community
Credits: 3.00
This course will examine juvenile crime within a larger social context, exploring the positive and negative contributions of the individual, the family, peer, schools and the larger community. Intervention strategies will be assessed, and a model will be presented for community action that can reduce/prevent juvenile crime.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4260 - Prisoner Reentry & Comm Correc
CEUs: 3.00
This course will examine how criminal justice social scientists develop, examine and evaluate the impact and successes of the various community corrections programs. Examines community corrections, probation and parole, treatment philosophies, and strategies for supervision. Evidence-based, effective community-based correctional programs will be examined.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4265 - Crime and Social Inequality
CEUs: 3.00
This course offers an examination of the relationships between social stratification, crime, and criminal justice. Explored will be the empirical and theoretical associations that race/ethnicity, sex/gender, social class, and other systems of inequality have with crime, victimization, and criminal justice system response. This course also explores the relationship between social inequality, criminal offending, and criminal victimization. In addition, how racial/ethnic, gender, age, and socioeconomic inequality influence (and are influenced by) criminal justice policy making, processes, and outcomes will be explored. Contemporary issues in policing, courts, sentencing, and punishment will be addressed to explore the complex interaction between social disadvantage (particularly related to race and ethnicity), the criminal justice system, and broader social relations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4277 - Police in Society
Credits: 3.00
The role of police in society changes as other demographic, social and political changes occur. This course will explore the challenges facing police today in terms of community relations, special populations, accountability and opening their ranks to more women and minorities.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4279 - Race and Crime
Credits: 3.00
This course examines the relationship between race, ethnicity, and crime and racial issues confronting the criminal justice system. Students will explore how other minority groups are treated by the criminal justice system. The course also examines how classical and contemporary theories are used to explain racial biases in the criminal justice system.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4280 - Contemp Iss in Crim Justice
Credits: 3.00
This course will focus on a particular issue being dealt with by the criminal justice system today. Students will critically examine the issue and related research and theories. The social context of the issue will be explored as well as possible actions to address the problem. Course is repeatable for credit.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4284 - Senior Capstone
Credits: 3.00
The Senior Capstone course is designed to ensure that the graduates of the Criminology program are equipped with the skills necessary to pursue further study or to take a job in the criminal justice system or other professional agency. The class requires students to demonstrate oral and written communication skills. Additionally students will be required to develop materials that will be helpful in finding employment.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4286 - Internship
Credits: 3.00 to 6.00
The internship provides students an opportunity to gain supervised work experience in an agency in their major area of study.
Lab: 3.00 to 6.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100 Minimum Grade: C


CRIM 4293 - Correctional Programs
Credits: 3.00
A course in correctional programs at the local, state, and federal levels including youth probation and parole. The organization and administration of correctional systems will be examined with particular attention given to control, classification, discipline, treatment, and post-release procedures for the juvenile and adult offenders.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4402 - Prison Law
Credits: 3.00
This course will examine the ever changing field of correctional law. It will focus on the evolution of inmate rights, the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court's willingness to get involved in the executive branch's business of running prisons, and the current court's movement away from the micro-managing of prisons in America.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4650 - Corporate & White Collar Crime
Credits: 3.00
This course presents an examination of corporate and white collar crime in the United States including definitional issues, typologies, theories, victimization, enforcement, and the sanctioning of organizations & individuals.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4693 - Sports, Crime, and Society
Credits: 3.00
The study of sports as a socializing influence within society. The analysis of the role of sports, the subculture of sports, the linkages with violence and crime, as well as other unintended consequences of sports in America and the world. Same as SOCI 4693.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4712 - Law and Society
Credits: 3.00
This course will introduce students to the liberal arts study of law. Students will investigate legal institutions and the law as social phenomena through readings and case studies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4911 - Terrorism
Credits: 3.00
This course examines domestic and international terrorism. It looks at the theories concerning the causes of terrorism and the various ways that individuals and institutions respond to terrorism. The 'war on terrorism' is examined for its unintended consequences.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology
Pre-requisites: CRIM 1100


CRIM 4981 - Directed Readings
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Title and description of the type of independent study to be offered will be specified on the variable credit form students must complete before registering for the class. May be repeated three times for credit.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 4983 - Senior Thesis
Credits: 3.00
This course gives senior criminology majors the opportunity to conduct significant, independent, empirical research under the supervision of a faculty thesis directory. Students are required to make an oral and written presentation of their research. May be taken twice for credit toward the degree.
Other: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 5001 - Survey Research Methods
Credits: 3.00
This course will introduce one of the most common research methods used in the field of criminology: the survey. Topics covered will include sampling, modes of conducting surveys, question wording, and dealing with non-response. In the later part of the semester, students will gain practical knowledge of the topic by conducting and supervising live telephone interviews.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 5004 - Managing Data
Credits: 3.00
This course teaches students to build and manage databases using SPSS. An emphasis is placed on working with large national data sets, including those available through the U.S. Census Bureau and the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research. Although a basic understanding of research methods and statistics is helpful, it is not necessary for this course.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 5231 - Women in the Crim Just System
Credits: 3.00
This course will introduce students to the participation of women in the criminal justice system. Offenses committed by females, laws peculiar to females, and the treatment of females by the system will be explored. Women as professionals and their impact on the system will also be discussed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 5232 - Family Violence
Credits: 3.00
Course will examine family violence form both a personal and social perspective. Research and theory in family violence will be discussed, along with types of relationships, incidence, prevalence, inter-personal dynamics, contributing factors, consequences, social response and services. Prevention strategies will be explored.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 5280 - Contemp Iss in Crim Justice
Credits: 3.00
This course will focus on a particular issue being dealt with by the criminal justice system today. Students will critically examine the issue and related research and theories. The social context of the issue will be explored as well as possible actions to address the problem.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 5981 - Directed Readings
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Title and description of the type of independent study to be offered will be specified on the variable credit form students must complete before being permitted to register for this class. May be repeated three times for credit.
Lab: 3.00 to 9.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6000 - Principles of Criminology
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an introduction to the program and an overview of the basic scope, mission and methods of criminology. Topics addressed include the current state of theory and research on the nature of law, criminality, and social control. Note: Required of first-year graduates in Criminology.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6003 - Applied Stats in Criminology
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to introduce the graduate student to the principal statistical analysis methods in criminology and criminal justice sciences. This course will cover inferential statistics and their interpretation. It will also include the application of statistical packages. This course assumes an elementary understanding of statistics at the undergraduate level thus it is desirable that students have taken prior coursework in statistics.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6010 - Theories of Crime & Justice
Credits: 3.00
This course is an advanced study of criminology theory. A range of theoretical perspectives within three general paradigms - classical/neoclassical, positivist, and critical will be explored. Historical foundations and contemporary perspectives will also be examined with an emphasis on the effect of these perspectives on policy.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6013 - Social Research
Credits: 3.00
This course will discuss the quantitative and qualitative methods of research that are commonly used in the social sciences. Students will learn about survey research, experiments, observational/field work, and interview studies. Topics to be covered include: methods of inquiry, causality, sampling, research instrument design, data collection, coding, ethics, and statistics (briefly).
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6182 - Special Seminars
Credits: 3.00
Title and description of the instruction to be offered will be specified on a variable credit form. The variable credit form must be completed before a student will be allowed to register for this course. Transcript entries carry different nomenclature to correspond with material taught. May be repeated on different content at least two times for credit.
Other: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6222 - Conflict Resolution
Credits: 3.00
Conflict Resolution covers a broad range of activities aimed at resolving differences in effective but nonviolent ways. This class will include coverage of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration as ways of developing peaceful agreements. Special emphasis will be given to conflict resolution issues of the criminal justice system such as hostage negotiations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6233 - Ethics and Criminal Justice
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on major moral theories and ethical decision making in the field of criminal justice. Conflicting loyalties, competing social demands, and sub-cultural strains specific to criminal justice will be explored.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6241 - Legal Theories
Credits: 3.00
An interdisciplinary exploration of classical and contemporary texts in legal theory. The primary focus will be to discover those things for which legal theory must account as well as examining contemporary critiques of legal theory such as is entailed by the critical legal studies movement. As a research project, students are encouraged to either explore in-depth one of the theories covered in this course or to cover additional theories of theorists in legal studies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6255 - Delinquency,Family & Community
Credits: 3.00
This course will examine juvenile crime within a larger social context, exploring the positive and negative contributions of the individual, the family, peer, schools, and the larger community. Intervention strategies will be assessed, and a model will be presented for community action that can reduce/prevent juvenile crime.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6266 - Perspectives On Violence
Credits: 3.00
This course looks at the problem of violence from an interdisciplinary perspective. It is designed to allow the student to become familiar with the social, psychological, biological, and public policy issues that surround this social problem. Particular attention will be paid to issues of domestic violence, gangs, and suicide.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6275 - Planning and Evaluation
Credits: 3.00
Social science research methods applied to determine program/policy effectiveness. Students will learn skills in process and outcome evaluation, and how to utilize evaluation findings for future planning.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6279 - White Collar Crime
Credits: 3.00
This class provides an overview of white collar crime in the criminal justice system. Topics will include the basic principles and theories underlying white collar crime, including the principles that allow corporations and individuals relative freedom from prosecution. It addresses substantive areas of white collar crime, while exploring the variety of offenses that are included in this area.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6280 - Seminar in Social Justice
Credits: 3.00
This course offers an opportunity to explore a number of areas, which may be defined within the broad heading of justice. It takes a realistic and critical look at the legal, social psychological, and political effects of the 'justice system' on people and their cities. Students will be asked to analyze these effects from the perspective of what is 'just' or 'unjust' - what can we do about it.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6286 - Internship
Credits: 1.00 to 6.00
Students will be placed in an agency compatible with their area of concentration to gain applied experience prior to graduation.
Other: 1.00 to 6.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6333 - Victimology
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an advanced analysis of the nature, causes, and consequences of criminal victimization and will include international and human rights perspectives.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6340 - Advanced Criminological Theory
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the major conceptual and propositional developments in criminological theory and the role paticular theorists played in those developments.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6341 - Constitutional & Judicial Prin
Credits: 3.00
This course will review the development and implementation of the U.S. Constitution throughout American history. Attitudes for and against specific interpretations of the constitution, i.e. strict constructionist, will be explored.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6342 - Crisis Intervention
Credits: 3.00
This course presents an overview of techniques and approaches to crisis intervention for crisis management professionals. It covers initial intervention, defusing and assessment, resolution and/or referral, with emphasis on empathy. Crisis theory will be examined and then applied to various types of crises including sexual assault/rape; natural disasters; personal loss; and suicide.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6345 - Homeland Security
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on the study of how the United States has dealt historically with internal security matters as well as the development of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) after 9/11. This course is designed to help students develop critical thinking skills in order to become better evaluators of national security, and to help students prepare for careers in homeland security-related professions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6350 - Terrorism
Credits: 3.00
This course examines domestic and international terrorism. It looks at the theories concerning the causes of terrorism and the various ways that individuals and institutions respond to terrorism. The 'war on terrorism' is examined for its unintended consequences.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6360 - Law Enforcement Leadership
Credits: 3.00
The course enhances each student's understanding of the importance of personal, interpersonal and organizational relationships, as well as the nature of police management. Concepts such as responsibility, courage, leadership, organizational values, integrity, and organizational design are presented in relation to problem solving.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6370 - Correctional Management
Credits: 3.00
This course integrates policy and practical issues in correctional settings with management theory. Students will also learn about typical correctional clients, life in prison and issues related to the management of correctional programs.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6380 - Criminal Justice Administratn
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to provide students with an in depth look into the theory and practice of criminal justice administration. Several theoretical approaches will be examined, followed by a critical evaluation of how they have been put into practice. Critical thinking and problem solving is emphasized throughout the course.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6623 - Crime and Social Inequality
Credits: 3.00
This course offers an examination of the relationships between social stratification, crime, and criminal justice. Explored will be the empirical and theoretical associations that race/ethnicity, sex/gender, social class, and other systems of inequality have with crime, victimization, and criminal justice system response.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6982 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Varies by student and professor.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6983 - Continuing Registration
Credits: 1.00
Must be taken by those who are finishing course work to remove an incomplete while not enrolled for other courses or those who are not enrolled for thesis hours but are completing thesis or position papers.
Other: .00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology


CRIM 6999 - Thesis
Credits: 1.00 to 9.00

Other: 1.00 to 9.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Criminology



Computer Science

Computer Science


CS 1000 - Practical Computing
Credits: 1.00
A hands-on introduction to the use of personal computers and software: input/output devices, graphical user interfaces, terminology, and software.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science


CS 1020 - Computers and Society
Credits: 2.00
A hands-on introduction to the use of personal computers and software, with an introductory examination of the effects of computer technology on contemporary society. Topics will include productivity applications, creation of Web pages, and societal and ethical issues in computing; privacy, security, censorship, and the changes in work, school, and entertainment fostered by computing.
Lecture: 1.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science


CS 1030 - Intro to Computer Concepts
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the concepts, usage, and uses of computers. Topics include the social and ethical aspects of computing; the Internet, including the creation of Web pages; overview of computer architecture, operating systems, and applications; an introduction to algorithms and programming using Visual BASIC.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science


CS 1300 - Intro to Computer Science
Credits: 4.00
This course introduces two fundamental aspects of computer science--abstraction and design--as students learn to develop programs in a high-level programming language. Students will study and implement a variety of applications, including graphics and scientific simulations. The course assumes no prior background in programming or computer science.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science


CS 1301 - Computer Science I
Credits: 4.00
This course explores the three fundamental aspects of computer science--theory, abstraction, and design--as the students develop moderately complex software in a high-level programming language. It will emphasize problem solving, algorithm development, and object-oriented design and programming. This course may not be attempted more than three times without department approval.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1112 Minimum Grade: C


CS 1302 - Computer Science II
Credits: 4.00
This course continues the exploration of theory, abstraction, and design in computer science as the students develop more complex software in a high-level programming language. This course may not be attempted more than two times without department approval.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 1301 Minimum Grade: B


CS 2100 - Intro to Web Development
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the design and implementation of web pages and sites: foundations of human-computer interaction; development processes; interface, site and navigation design; markup and style-sheet languages; site evaluation; introduction to client-side scripting.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 1301 Minimum Grade: B


CS 3110 - System Architecture
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to systems architecture and its impact on software execution. Topics include digital logic and digital systems, machine level representation of data, assembly level machine organization, memory systems organization, I/O and communication, and CPU implementation.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 1302 Minimum Grade: B


CS 3151 - Data Struct & Discrete Math I
Credits: 4.00
An integrated approach to the study of data structures, algorithm analysis, and discrete mathematics. Topics include induction and recursion, time and space complexity, and big-O notation, propositional logic, proof techniques, sorting, mathematical properties of data structures, including lists.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 1302 Minimum Grade: B and MATH 1634 Minimum Grade: C


CS 3152 - Data Struct & Discrete Math II
Credits: 4.00
A continuation of CS 3151. Topics include sets, relations and functions, graphs, state spaces and search techniques; automata, regular expressions, and context free grammars; NP-completeness.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 3151


CS 3201 - Program Construction I
Credits: 3.00
The craft and science of software construction: effective practices, principles, and patterns for building correct, understandable, testable and maintainable object-oriented code.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 1302 Minimum Grade: B


CS 3202 - Program Construction II
Credits: 3.00
A continuation of CS 3201: effective practices, principles and patterns for building correct, understandable, testable, and maintainable code using a variety of programming paradigms, programming languages and system architectures.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 3201 Minimum Grade: C


CS 3211 - Software Engineering I
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the software development life cycle and contemporary software development methods. This course places special emphasis on object-oriented systems. Students are expected to complete a medium scale software project.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 1302 Minimum Grade: B


CS 3212 - Software Engineering II
Credits: 3.00
Software development methods for large scale systems. Management of software development projects. Software engineering standards. Students are expected to complete a large scale software project.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 3211 Minimum Grade: C


CS 3230 - Information Management
Credits: 3.00
This course covers principles of database systems. Topics include theory of relational databases, database design techniques, database query languages, transaction processing, distributed databases, privacy and civil liberties. Students are expected to complete a project in database design, administration, and development.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 3211


CS 3270 - Intelligent Systems
Credits: 3.00
Application and survey of problem-solving methods in artificial intelligence with emphasis on heuristic programming, production systems, neural networks, agents, social implications of computing, and professional ethics and responsibilities.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 1302 Minimum Grade: B and MATH 1634


CS 3280 - Systems Programming
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to system-level software development. Topics include OS processes, network communication, file-system organization and manipulation, and script programming.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 1302 Minimum Grade: B


CS 4180 - Advanced Web Development
CEUs: 3.00
This course focuses on current industry best practices used to develop dynamic, interactive, multi-page websites. Topics include user-interface development, common web components, database interactions, and security.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 2100 and CS 3211


CS 4225 - Distributed & Cloud Computing
Credits: 3.00
This course introduces the foundations and applications of distributed and cloud computing. Topics include multi-threaded programming, scheduling, synchronization, network architecture, distributed computing and distributed services, cloud services, and internet-scale computing.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 3110 and CS 3280


CS 4275 - Machine Learning Foundations
CEUs: 3.00
A broad introduction into the theoretical foundations and essential algorithms for supervised and unsupervised learning with a focus on best practices and real-world problems.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 3270 Minimum Grade: C and MATH 4203


CS 4981 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Individual study in computer science through a mutual agreement between the student and a computing faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 hours credit. Departmental consent is required for use of this credit toward a major or minor in computer science.
Lab: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science


CS 4982 - Computing Capstone
Credits: 3.00
This course integrates core topics of computer science body of knowledge, teamwork, and professional practices through the implementation of a large scale project.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 3212 and CS 3230


CS 4983 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Individual research in computer science through a mutual agreement between the student and a computing faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 hours credit. Departmental consent is required for use of this credit toward a major or minor in computer science.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science


CS 4985 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topics in Computer Science designed to give students knowledge at the frontier of a rapidly changing field.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 3211


CS 4986 - Computing Internship
Credits: 3.00
A hands-on supervised field experience in computing. Students will create and present a comprehensive portfolio documenting the field experience. Students may replace this course with CS 4983, CS 4985, or CS 4981. This course may be repeated for a total of 6 hours. Grading is S/U
Other: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 3151 Minimum Grade: C or CS 3201 Minimum Grade: C or CS 3211 Minimum Grade: C


CS 6231 - Database Systems I
Credits: 3.00
Fundamental concepts of database systems; hierarchical, network and relational database management systems; data definition and manipulation languages; security and integrity; and implementation considerations. Students are expected to complete a project in database administration and development.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 6910


CS 6232 - Database Systems II
Credits: 3.00
Advanced concepts in database systems; object-oriented systems; distributed database systems; and concurrency control. Students will be introduced to current professional certification processes and standards.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 6231


CS 6241 - Software Development I
Credits: 3.00
This course introduces the software development process while improving programming skills. Topics include object-oriented programming, test-driven development, class design, GUI design and programming, and incremental, iterative development. The coursework assumes that the student has fundamental programming, debugging, and code-interpretation skills in an object-oriented programming language.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 6910


CS 6242 - Software Development II
Credits: 3.00
This course continues the introduction of the software development process begun in CS 6241. Topics include software development process models, process management, requirements specification, and software modeling.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 6241


CS 6251 - Web Technologies I
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the design, development, and implementation of web sites using client-side technologies. Students are expected to develop a dynamic web site using current industry best practices for client-side development.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science


CS 6252 - Web Technologies II
Credits: 3.00
A continuation of CS 6251: design, development, and implementation of web sites using client- and server-side technologies. Students are expected to develop a dynamic web site using current industry best practices for client- and sever-side development.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 6251


CS 6261 - Advanced Tools & Tech
Credits: 3.00
This course covers software design, implementation, testing, and deployment using industry-standard tools, frameworks, and best practices.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 6252 and CS 6312


CS 6311 - Program Construction I
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to object-oriented design and programming using fundamental software engineering principles and concepts. Students are expected to develop an object-oriented application using current industry best practices for program development.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science


CS 6312 - Program Construction II
Credits: 3.00
A continuation of CS 6311. Students are expected to develop a moderately complex object-oriented application using current industry best practices for program development.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 6311


CS 6910 - Project I
Credits: 3.00
Integration of core knowledge and skills in program construction and web technologies with teamwork and professional practices through directed participation in the implementation of a significant software project.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 6252 and CS 6312


CS 6920 - Project II
Credits: 6.00
Comprehensive integration of knowledge and skills attained in the program with teamwork and professional practices through the implementation of a significant software project.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 8.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CS 6232 and CS 6242 and CS 6910



Computer Science

Computer Science


CSCI 1301 - Computer Science I
CEUs: 4.00
CSCI 1301 is an introduction to computer science with coverage of algorithmic foundations, hardware concepts, and introductory programming in Java. Specific topics include data storage, data manipulation, and data abstractions. Programming concepts covered are algorithm design, primitive data types, and expressions, loops, modular programming, conditional execution, program logic, and arrays.
Lecture: 4.00
College: eCampus



Curriculum in Education

Curriculum in Education


CURR 6575 - Curriculum Trends and Issues
Credits: 3.00
This course is a critical study of the design and implementation of curricula in the field of education.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Education Dean's Office



Early Childhood Education

Early Childhood Education


ECED 0001 - Early Childhood Block I
Credits: 1.00 to 11.00

Lecture: 1.00 to 11.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ECED 0002 - Early Childhood Block II
Credits: 1.00 to 14.00

Lecture: 1.00 to 14.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ECED 0003 - Early Childhood Block III
Credits: 1.00 to 14.00

Lecture: 1.00 to 14.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ECED 0004 - Dual Certification Block I
Credits: .00 to 10.00

Lecture: .00 to 10.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE


ECED 0005 - Dual Certification Block II
Credits: .00 to 13.00

Lecture: .00 to 13.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 3214 - Expl Activ:Music and Fine Arts
Credits: 2.00
An introductory course that surveys methods and activities to teach fundamental skills in movement/dance/drama, art and music in the early childhood/elementary curriculum. Field experience required. Admission to Teacher Education. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 3271, ECED 3282 and READ 3251, or with Advisor approval.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE


ECED 3271 - Curr,Instrct,Clssrm Mgt PreK-5
Credits: 3.00
Students will examine theories and models for designing curriculum, instruction, and classroom management in Pre-K through fifth grade classrooms. Students will also observe and apply these theories and models during a field based experience.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE


ECED 3282 - Practicum I
Credits: 1.00
Students are placed in a designated early childhood/elementary site. Requirements include observing children and planning and implementing learning activities with the guidance of a qualified supervisor. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 3214, ECED 3271 and READ 3251 or with advisor approval.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 1.00 Other: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ECED 4251 - Assess & Correct Math Educ
Credits: 3.00
Overviews development of acquisition of mathematical concepts. The assessment/correction process is examined. Teaching strategies appropriate to children with learning difficulties are described. Individual assessment and analysis of a particular child's mathematical problems, including teaching to this analysis are developed in case study form. Current research on teaching mathematics to children with special needs is examined. Knowledge of teaching strategies and the assessment/correction process will be applied during field experience. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 4284, READ 3263 and READ 4251 or with advisor approval.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ECED 4251L - Assess & Correction Clinical L
Credits: 1.00
This course requires the supervised and coordinated diagnosing and correcting of students in K-5 classrooms. The lab experiences shall require demonstration of the content knowledge and pedagogical skills acquired in ECED 4251 - Assessment and Correction in Mathematics Education.
Lab: 1.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Co-requisites: ECED 4251


ECED 4261 - Tch Content/Process:Soc Stud
Credits: 3.00
Students will examine the current content and methodology of social studies education for young learners (grades P-5). Students will design and implement learning experiences that incorporate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes appropriate for an elementary social studies program. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 4262, ECED 4263, ECED 4283, and READ 3262 or with Advisor approval.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ECED 4262 - Tch Content/Process:Science Ed
Credits: 3.00
Students will examine content, methodology, skills, and materials used to teach science to children in grades P-5 by means of course discussions and assignments, field placements/assignments and course readings. Emphasis will be placed on developmentally appropriate practices and integration with mathematics and other appropriate subject areas. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 4261, ECED 4263, ECED 4283 and READ 3262 or with advisor approval.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ECED 4263 - Tch Content/Process:Math Educ
Credits: 3.00
Mathematics education content, methods and materials which are appropriate for the cognitive development of the young child from Pre-K to Grade 5 will be investigated. Students will apply knowledge of content, methods and materials during field experience. Must be takenconcurrently with ECED 4261, ECED 4262, ECED 4283 and READ 3262 or with advisor approval.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ECED 4283 - Practicum II
Credits: 2.00
Students are placed in a designated early childhood/elementary site. Requirements include observing children and planning and implementing learning activities with the guidance of a qualified supervisor. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 4261, ECED 4262, ECED 4263 and READ 3262 or with advisor approval.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ECED 4284 - Practicum III
Credits: 2.00
Application for field experience required prior to enrollment. Students are placed in a designated early childhood/elementary site. Requirements include observing children and planning and implementing learning activities with the guidance of a qualified supervisor.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ECED 4285 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Titles and descriptions of specific courses to be inserted at time of offering. May be repeated for credit.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE


ECED 4286 - Teaching Internship
Credits: 9.00
Students will be involved 15 weeks (one semester) in a full-time, supervised and directed classroom setting. Application to field experience required prior to enrollment Must be taken concurrently with ECED 4289; a practicum/intership fee will be charged.
Lab: 18.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ECED 4287 - Teaching Internship I
Credits: 3.00
Students will be in a full-time, supervised and directed classroom setting. Application to field experience required prior to enrollment Provisionally certified students only. A practicum/internship fee will be charged.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ECED 4288 - Teaching Internship II
Credits: 3.00
Students will be in a full-time, supervised and directed classroom setting. Application to field experience required prior to enrollment. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 4289.
Lab: 6.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ECED 4289 - Teaching Internship Seminar
Credits: 3.00
Designed to engage interns in a critical reflection of issues, topics materials and skills appropriate to their professional development and teaching experience during their internship. Will also serve as a capstone experience for satisfying exit requirements of the program. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 4286 or ECED 4288.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE


ECED 6249 - Seminar For P-5 Teachers
Credits: 3.00
A seminar designed to synthesize the theories, concepts, NBPTS propositions, and instructional strategies that have been learned during the M.Ed. program. A 'capstone' field project with students in a PK-5 setting will be a requirement for this course. This seminar is also designed to enhance skills in critical thinking, comprehension of research, and decision-making as an effective practitioner. A completion of the Master's degree portfolio will also be accomplished in this course. This course should be taken within the last two semesters of graduation.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 6261 - Developing Affective Curricula
Credits: 3.00
A course designed to facilitate sensitivity to the emotional needs of students, and to plan and implement affective curriculum activities.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 6262 - Lang Devl:Implic for Chldhd Ed
Credits: 3.00
Language and its acquisition; studied in relation to mental development and school achievement.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 6271 - P-5 School Curriculum
Credits: 3.00
A critical study of the design and implementation of curricula in the education of children (Pre-K through fifth grade). Attention is given to historical, philosophical and theoretical perspectives; current national standards; programmatic design and organization; and the use of personnel, materials, and equipment. National Board for Professional Teaching Standards and a certification portfolio based on National Board propositions are introduced as the conceptual framework and exit requirement for the M.Ed. program. This course should be taken within the first two semesters of the M.Ed. program.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 6285 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Titles and descriptions of specific courses to be inserted at time of offering. May be repeated for credit.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 6288 - Continuing Practicum
Credits: 1.00
Practical experience with students in a PK-5 setting under the supervision of ECED faculty is a prerequisite for this course. (Requires the completion of activities described in the Entry Packet and enrollment during the same semester as ECED 6249 Seminar for Early Childhood Teachers).
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 6290 - Readng,Interpret,Apply Resrch
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to early childhood research, design, and sources of reference.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 7259 - Investig Math Methods/Material
Credits: 3.00
Concepts and material which are appropriate for mathematics education of Pre K - Grade 5 children will be investigated. In addition, research on the use of process education in these areas will be considered.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 7260 - Investig Science Meth/Material
Credits: 3.00
Students will examine the research and literature base forming the foundation behind the content, methodology, skills, and materials used to teach science to children in grades P-5.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 7261 - Literature for the Young Child
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to give the early childhood educator an opportunity to become acquainted with classic and current literature for children. Emphasis will be given to integrating literature in all curriculum areas (whole language approach).
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 7262 - Investigating Language Arts
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to assist the teacher in integrating the teaching of language arts including: reading, writing, oral language, listening, as well as viewing and visual representation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 7263 - Writing Across The Curriculum
Credits: 3.00
Since writing can be used as a tool for learning, reflection and discovery, students in this course will study a variety of children's writing and will study the writing process (a tool for thinking about writing) and its appropriate use throughout the curriculum.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 7264 - Invest Social Studies Methods
Credits: 3.00
Graduate students will critique current methodology, trends, and issues; evaluate strategies for implementing curricular and instructional change; and enrich their decision-making and leadership skills to enhance the elementary (P-5) social studies curriculum.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 7265 - Parent Ed/Teach Chld Care Wkrs
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the child from the parental viewpoint. Strong emphasis will be given to changing family structure, family communication, responsibilities of parenting as they relate to teacher education and child care givers. Parenting in high-risk families and children with exceptionalities will be addressed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 7266 - The Young Child: Home & Commun
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to aid in the understanding of the effects of home, community and society on the life of young children.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 7267 - Teaching Creative Arts
Credits: 3.00
Development of the concept that through creative arts children communicate ideas and feelings and develop sensitivity and perception. Emphasis will be given to integration of the creative arts in all curriculum areas.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 7268 - Teaching Creative Dramatics
Credits: 3.00
The study of creative dramatic techniques for early childhood and elementary age children.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 7271 - Diversity & Classrm Early P-5
Credits: 3.00
Students will examine issues relating to cultural pluralism and global perspectives, equitable education of diverse student populations, and aspects of teacher behavior, cultural variations, and student variations relevant to learning and teaching. Topics will include the theoretical foundations of multicultural education, the importance of cross-cultural communication, and major theoretical and empirical approaches to classroom management. Students will also examine, evaluate, and develop curricular materials, decision making and problem solving skills, and techniques to effectively instruct and manage within learning environments of diverse populations of P-5 students.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 7272 - Classrm Mgmt Early Grades(P-5)
Credits: 3.00
Students will examine major theoretical and empirical approaches to classroom management, develop appropriate decision making and problem solving skills, and formulate techniques to manage effectively a learning environment for students in grades P-5.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 7273 - Family/Comm Inv for Sch Improv
Credits: 3.00
Family/Community Involvement for School Improvement is designed to acquaint teachers of early childhood and elementary grade children with techniques for working with and involving families and communities. In this course, four areas of parent and community involvement will be emphasized: home-school communication, parent education, volunteerism, and public/community relations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 7281 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Preparation of an independent project under the direction of a full-time college faculty member.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 7282 - Directed Readings in Education
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Concentrated readings and review of research studies and literature relative to areas of significance to early childhood education.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 7285 - Special Topics
Credits: 3.00
Titles and descriptions of specific courses to be inserted at time of offering. May be repeated for credit.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 8200 - Oral Comp Exam Elemtry Ed.S.
CEUs: .00
A comprehensive final exam is administered during fall, spring, or summer semester immediately preceding graduation to all candidates seeking a Specialist degree in Elementary Education. Candidates complete the comprehensive oral exam at the end of their program of study by preparing a 60-90 minute presentation over summative questions.
Lecture: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 8271 - Advanced Curriculum Seminar
Credits: 3.00
An in-depth study in a seminar setting of curriculum trends, problems, and issues facing educators of children in P-5 environments.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 8272 - Teacher as Leader
Credits: 3.00
Designed to provide students with knowledge of factors and processes related to teacher leadership roles within schools. Topics such as mentoring, peer coaching, community relations, organizational change, and advocacy will be addressed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 8284 - Research Seminar
Credits: 3.00
A study of the basic elements of research and research design as it relates to the development of research in early childhood education.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECED 8297 - Professional Seminar
Credits: 3.00
A course designed to provide a forum for professional interaction between students and professors on critical issues in the profession. Prerequisite: ECED 8284 Research Seminar
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: ECED 8284



Economics

Economics


ECON 2100 - Economics for Everyone
Credits: 3.00
The economic principles of demand, supply, markets and the economic issues of inflation, unemployment and government spending will be among the topics covered.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics


ECON 2105 - Principles of Macroeconomics
Credits: 3.00
A study of the economy as a whole including production, economic fluctuations, inflation, unemployment, public policy, and international economics. Requires overall GPA of 2.0.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: GPA 2.00 or above required 2.00


ECON 2106 - Principles of Microeconomics
Credits: 3.00
A study of the individual elements of an economy, including demand, supply, price, firms, production, costs, profits, market structures, income determination and international trade. Requires overall GPA of 2.0.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: GPA 2.00 or above required 2.00


ECON 3400 - Consumer Economics
Credits: 3.00
Emphasis is placed on basic and useful information needed for effective personal spending, saving, and budgeting.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 3402 - Statistics for Business I
Credits: 3.00
Course emphasis is on applications of statistics in business. Topics include methods of presenting data, numerical measures and correlation, probability theory and probability distributions, sampling distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ( MATH 1111 or MATH 1113 ) and CISM 2201 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 3406 - Statistics for Business II
Credits: 3.00
This course covers basic quantitative tools for use in strategic and business decision making. Topics include decision analysis, linear regression, forecasting, linear programming and waiting line models.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ( ECON 3402 or MATH 2063 ) and MATH 1413 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 3408 - Intro to Programming Anlytics
CEUs: 3.00
This course introduces new Business Intelligence and Data Analytics students to methods used for creating, handling, and processing data sources. This course emphasizes a hands-on, practical approach to data processing and analysis with SAS, an industry-standard business intelligence and statistical software package available for MS Windows, Linux, and UNIX operating system.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 3402 Minimum Grade: C


ECON 3410 - Macroeconomic Policy
Credits: 3.00
Intermediate analysis of macroeconomic problems such as inflation, unemployment, and economic growth and effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy in combating these problems. International implications of policy also emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 and ( MATH 1111 or MATH 1113 ) and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 3411 - Intermediate Microeconomics
Credits: 3.00
The course develops models of the economic behavior of consumers, firms, and government. The topics include: supply and demand, competitive equilibrium and the role of prices in resource allocation, non-competitive market structures, game theory and strategy, externalities, public goods and public policy.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 and ( MATH 1111 or MATH 1113 ) and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 3420 - Econ History of the US
Credits: 3.00
Examines the historical foundation of American economic growth and development from the colonial period to the twentieth century. Focuses on institutional and structural changes and processes of growth.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 3425 - Economic Geography
Credits: 3.00
A study of the spatial organization of economic activities. Introduces and critiques theories of location and economic development and structural relationships among cities. Same as GEOG 3253.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: GEOG 1013 Minimum Grade: D and ( GPA 2.00 or above required 2.00 and College of Business Maj-Minor 1 ) and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 3440 - History of Economic Thought
Credits: 3.00
This course covers the evolution of economic ideas and theories, their social and philosophical preconceptions, and uses to which they have been put in developing policy and their influence upon modern economics. Topics include ancient and medieval economic thought, mercantilism, physiocracy, classical and neoclassical schools, socialist and Marxian critiques, Austrian school, and institutional economics.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 3450 - Economics of Sports
Credits: 3.00
This course will be a survey of the theory and literature of the economics issues relevant in professional and college-level sports. Topics include ticket pricing, public funding of arenas or stadiums, labor issues, and antitrust policy.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 2106 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 3458 - Economic Anthropology
Credits: 3.00
A cultural approach to how societies produce, distribute and consume goods, services and resources. Same as ANTH 3158.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ANTH 1102 and ECON 2105 or ECON 2106 and GPA 2.00 or above required 2.00 and College of Business Maj-Minor 1 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 3460 - Forecasting
Credits: 3.00
A study of the nature of business fluctuations and their underlying causes. Emphasis is on the application of various forecasting techniques with regard to analyzing and projecting future business and economic conditions at the national, regional, industry, and firm levels.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 and ECON 3402 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 3480 - Environ and Nat Resource Econ
Credits: 3.00
This course surveys the issues arising from the interaction of economic and ecological systems, the suitability of the market mechanism to allocate natural and environmental resources, and policy options when markets fail. Applications include energy, climate change, pollution control, land use, fishery management, and water scarcity.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 2106 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 3490 - Ethic, Moral, & Phil Fnd Capt
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to explore the moral, ethical, and economic foundations of the capitalist system. The economic prespectives of thinkers such as M. Friedman, F.A. Hayek, J.M. Keynes, Karl Marx, Ayn Rand and Adam Smith will be compared and contrasted. This course will address current issues such as corporate social responsibility, the role of government in the economy, and the implications of personal economic philosophies on individual decision making.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 3510 - Money and Banking
Credits: 3.00
Monetary theories and role of banking institutions in capital formation, price determination, interest rates, and discount policies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ECON 2105 Minimum Grade: C


ECON 4408 - Visual Analytics
CEUs: 3.00
This course provides a rigorous treatment to modern tools in data visualization and analytics. Subjects covered include data management and preparation for various data structures and formats, such as importing and exporting data, merging and joining data sets, and re-shaping, collapsing, or aggregating data for analysis purposes. Students will work with various data examples to create their own interactive data graphics. Students will also learn how to combine data visualization tools with data science techniques, such as cluster analysis and regression trees.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 3408 Minimum Grade: C


ECON 4410 - Money and Banking
Credits: 3.00
An introductory study of the types and functions of money and financial intermediaries, money creation and control, monetary and fiscal policy, international finance, and the effects of these upon domestic incomes, employment, prices, and interest rates.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 4415 - Health Economics
CEUs: 3.00
This course is an in-depth study of health economics. The course emphasizes applying microeconomic theory to studying the behavior of diverse economic agents in the healthcare market, such as patients, physicians, hospitals, and insurance companies. The course also examines the evolution of the healthcare industry in the U.S. and analyzes government policies like Medicare, Medicaid, and the Affordable Care Act.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 2106 Minimum Grade: C


ECON 4420 - Labor Economics
Credits: 3.00
Involves an in-depth study of the economic theories related to the labor market with emphasis placed on managerial and policy applications. Topics covered include labor supply and demand, discrimination, and the economic impact of unions and collective bargaining.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 4440 - Public Finance
Credits: 3.00
A study of the equity and economic effects of government spending programs, taxes, and debt. The course is primarily applied microeconomics. Same as POLS 4204.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 4450 - International Economics
Credits: 3.00
The course covers the history, institutions, policy and theory of international economic relations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 4470 - Comparative Economic Systems
Credits: 3.00
The course compares and contrasts the forms of economic organization.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 and ( GPA 2.00 or above required 2.00 and College of Business Maj-Minor 1 ) and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 4475 - Intro to Econometrics
Credits: 3.00
The course emphasis is on applications of econometrics and techniques in business analytics. Topics include methods of presenting data, numerical measures and correlation, estimation, linear/non-linear regression, limited dependent variables, simultaneous equations/instrumental variables, models of duration, and the use of these models in decision making processes. SAS business analytics software will be used in this course.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 3402 and ECON 3460 and MATH 1413 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 4476 - Sr Seminar Data Intl&Bus Analy
CEUs: 3.00
This course is a capstone seminar for students in the Data Intelligence and Business Analytics major. Students will use software, such as R, to analyze a data set and propose a unique project that can be presented as a stand-alone analysis of the data. Techniques used will include base, grid, and lattice graphics, statistical techniques, such as regression and forecasting, and basic programming.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 3408 Minimum Grade: C and ECON 3402 Minimum Grade: C and ECON 3460 Minimum Grade: C


ECON 4480 - Urban and Regional Economics
Credits: 3.00
A study of the economic organization of urban areas and regions. Emphasis is on the analysis of urban land use and real estate markets, contemporary urban problems and public policies, and current issues in urban and regional economic development.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 4481 - Independent Study in Economics
Credits: 1.00 to 6.00
Directed program of independent study or specific research topics.
Lecture: 1.00 to 6.00 Lab: 1.00 to 6.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 4484 - Seminar in Economics
Credits: 3.00
The course is the capstone course for all economics majors. The course will change topics and focus. The course will include an evaluation of the students understanding of economic principles.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 4485 - Special Topics in Economics
Credits: 3.00
Title and description of specific courses to be specified at time of offering. Course may be repeated with permission up to a maximum of 10 hours credit.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 4486 - Internship in Economics
Credits: 3.00
Work experience with a business, government agency or other organization.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: Richard College Upper Division RCUD


ECON 5440 - Public Finance
Credits: 3.00
A study of the equity and economic effects of government spending programs, taxes, and debt. The course is primarily applied microeconomics. Same as POLS 5204.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics


ECON 6420 - Current Economic Issues
Credits: 3.00
The course covers contemporary problems from an economic perspective. Issues covered include the national debt, health care, social security, population growth and other economic issues. (Not open to MBA students.)
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics


ECON 6430 - Business Forecasting
Credits: 3.00
This course provides a survey of forecasting methods used by managers and forecasting practitioners. Topics include time-trend, regression-based, time-series decomposition, and auto-regressive moving average methods.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics


ECON 6450 - Managerial Economics
Credits: 3.00
This course builds skills in microeconomic analysis for managers and provides a conceptual foundation for further functional area studies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, industrial organization, and aspects of game theory and statistical analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 2105 or 2106, ECON 3402
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ( ECON 2105 or ECON 2106 ) and ECON 3402


ECON 6461 - International Finance
Credits: 3.00
Topics may include foreign exchange market; exchange rates; balance of payments analysis and adjustment process; financing institutions, monetary relations, and monetary reform; gold, the dollar, devaluation, and SDRs. Same as FINC 6521.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics


ECON 6470 - Ethical Found of Capitalism
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to explore the moral, ethical, and economic foundations of the modern business environment. Topics include the role of the individual, business, and government in society. Students in the course are exposed to the writings of economic, ethical, and political thinkers such as Smith, Hobbes, Locke, Marx, Keynes, Rand, Hayek, and Friedman.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics


ECON 6481 - Independent Study in Economics
Credits: 1.00 to 6.00
Directed program of independent or specific research topics.
Lab: 1.00 to 6.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics


ECON 6485 - Special Topics in Economics
Credits: 3.00
Title and description of specific courses to be specified at time of offering. Course may be repeated with permission up to a maximum of 6 courts of credit.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Economics
Pre-requisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106



Early Childhood/Special Educ

Early Childhood/Special Educ


ECSE 3214 - Expl Curr for PreK-5 Classroom
Credits: 2.00
This course provides students with the basic pedagogical skills and developmentally appropriate practices for teaching exploratory curriculum (drama, art, music, physical activity, and health) in Pre-K-5 classrooms, including children with mild disabilities. The course will provide foundational pedagogy for candidates to begin their pre-service experience creating and evaluating lesson plans, exploring various instructional strategies, and methods for effective planning and instruction. Students will also apply knowledge of content, methods and materials during field experience.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE


ECSE 4761 - Teach Con & Proc: SS Dual Cert
Credits: 3.00
Candidates will examine the current content and methodology of social studies education for young learners (grades P-K) including those with disabilities. Candidates will explore ways to differentiate instruction to meet the needs of all learners. Candidates will design and implement learning experiences and that incorporate the knowledge and skills appropriate for an elementary social studies program. Field experience required.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and ECSE 3214


ECSE 4762 - Science Dual Certificate
Credits: 3.00
Students will examine curricular content, methodology, classroom organization and management, and materials used to teach science to children in grades P-5 by means of course discussions and assignments, field placements/assignments, and course readings. Emphasis will be placed on developmentally appropriate practices, teaching students with mild disabilities in science, and the integration of science with mathematics and other appropriate subject areas.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and ECSE 3214


ECSE 4763 - Math Dual Certificate
Credits: 3.00
Mathematics education content, methods and materials which are appropriate for the cognitive development of the young child from Pre-K to Grade 5 will be investigated by means of course discussions and assignments, field placements/assignments, and course readings. Students will apply knowledge of content, methods and materials during field experience. Emphasis will be placed on developmentally appropriate practices for teaching mathematics to all children in Pre-K-5 classrooms, including children with mild disabilities.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and ECSE 3214


ECSE 4764 - Literacy Dual Certificate
Credits: 3.00
Candidates will examine the theories, materials, and methods of literacy instruction. Candidates will explore ways to differentiate instruction to meet the needs of all learners. Students will design and implement learning experiences that incorporate knowledge and skills appropriate for an elementary literacy program.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and ECSE 3214


ECSE 4783 - Practicum I
Credits: 1.00
Students are placed in a designated early childhood/elementary site that includes students who have and studentswho do not have disabilities. Requirements include children and planning and implementing learning activities with the guidance of a qualified supervisor.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ECSE 4784 - Practicum II
Credits: 1.00
Students are placed in a designated early childhood/elementary site that includes students who have and students who do not have disabilities. Requirements include observing children and planning and implementing learning activities with the guidance of a qualified supervisor.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ECSE 4785 - Practicum III
CEUs: 2.00
This course is designed to engage students in clinical experiences in both general and special education. Students are placed in a designated early childhood/elementary site with half a semester in a traditional general education classroom and half a semester with a SPED teacher (inclusion classrooms or resource models). At the end of Block 3, teacher candidates choose to stay in the traditional classroom or to stay with the SPED teacher and follow their schedule. Requirements include observing children and planning and implementing learning activities for students with and without disabilities under the supervision of a qualified supervisor.
Lab: 4.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: ECSE 4784 and Teacher Education Admission TE


ECSE 4786 - Teaching Internship
Credits: 6.00
Teaching one semester in the public schools under the supervision of an experienced, qualified classroom teacher on the level and in the field of early childhood and /or special education. A student teaching seminar (ECSE 478) accompanies student teaching.
Lecture: 6.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Co-requisites: ECSE 4789
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ECSE 4789 - Teaching Internship Seminar
Credits: 3.00
Information and issues related to student teaching in the public schools under the supervision of an experienced, qualified classroom teacher on the level and in the field of early childhood and/or special education.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE


ECSE 7274 - Intro to Cmty-Based STEM Educ
Credits: 3.00
Students will be introduced to the concepts and skills necessary to develop an effective community-based STEM education project as well as the dispositions, knowledge, and teaching skills needed to teach integrated STEM lessons to students in grades P-12.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECSE 7275 - STEM Math for Social Justice
Credits: 3.00
Concepts and materials which are appropriate for mathematics education integrated with science, technology, and engineering for P-12 children will be investigated. In addition, STEM education is considered through the lens of social justice, equity, and community-based learning.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: ECSE 7274


ECSE 7276 - STEM Invest thru Ecojustice
Credits: 3.00
This course will introduce students to research in science education that promotes awareness for multiple perspectives and considers diverse aspects of STEM efforts within the community. Through a focus on ecojustice issues, the student will develop skills necessary to contextualize science instruction for effective community-based STEM initiatives as well as the dispositions, knowledge, and skills needed to teach integrated STEM lessons to students in P-12.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: ECSE 7274


ECSE 7277 - Designing Cmty-Based Stem Educ
Credits: 3.00
The purpose of this course is to foster an understanding of how teachers and STEM experts can influence education and impact communities through committed interactions and the sharing of knowledge. Prior STEM understanding will be enhanced through development of integrated STEM projects for the in-service teacher, elementary and secondary classroom, and for dispersal within the community. Through increased opportunity for action and dialogue associated with socio-cultural issues, students will become adept at identifying avenues for involvement in STEM that encourage community involvement as a means of promoting social justice.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: ECSE 7274 and ECSE 7276


ECSE 7500 - Diverse Classrms in Global Soc
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to examine issues relating to cultural pluralism and global perspectives in order to provide a richer understanding and appreciation of the social forces that influence the education of diverse student populations. Particular attention is given to culturally responsive teaching, ethical behaviors, and personal responsibility to affect change. Students will examine, evaluate, and develop curricular materials that include techniques to differentiate for diverse populations of P-12 students.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECSE 7560 - Contemp Issues in Education
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to guide 21st Century teachers in developing perspectives on the influences that affect public schools. Educational problems, trends, and issues will be identified and addressed, especially as they relate to students, teachers, school systems, and American society as a whole.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECSE 7564 - Content Area Literacy Instruct
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed for teachers who need strategies for helping their students comprehend informational texts and improve their informational writing skills across the curriculum, especially in content areas such as business, math, science, and social studies. Developmentally appropriate practice and literature for teaching reading and writing in the elementary, middle, and high school, to include the study of language and literacy, study skills, print and non-print media, and technology, will be examined across the curriculum and in relation to the Georgia Milestones Assessment System.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECSE 7566 - Adv Instr Strat for 21st Cent
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed for continued professional growth of teachers as they investigate and evaluate best practices in the teaching of English language arts, social studies, science, math, business, music, or other fields, with a focus on developing instructional strategies and curriculum that maximize the potential of 21st Century technologies to meet the needs of all learners. This course includes a field experience component that focuses on the use of online teaching platforms for instruction.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


ECSE 8562 - Data to Meet Needs of Diverse
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to advance teachers’ understandings of the philosophies and practices of educational measurement as they apply to diverse student assessment data (specifically data collection and analysis). Students will demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of quality assessment with regard to the reliability and validity of such measures with special emphasis on existing student diversity. Students will also demonstrate the skills and understanding needed to design and construct their own assessments and interpret the results of these assessments as well as those made by others.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed



Educ Accomplished Teaching

Educ Accomplished Teaching


EDAT 6001 - Assessment to Improve Teach
Credits: 3.00
Advanced study of the critical role of formative and summative assessment implementation and evaluation in an effective standards-based P-12 classroom. The course addresses knowledge of assessment theory and skill in effective practice. This course is offered in partnership with Valdosta State University as part of the GOML/MATC Program.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership & Instruction


EDAT 7100 - Research Meth in Education
Credits: 3.00
A survey of education and educationally-related research methods incorporating an applied approach to research design. The ability to read, interpret, conduct and report research is emphasized to improve practice in educational settings. Course offered in partnership with Valdosta State University as part of the GOML/MATC Program.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership & Instruction



Educational Foundations

Educational Foundations


EDFD 2303 - Orientation to Education
Credits: 2.00
Prerequisite: Cumulative GPA of at least 2.5. An introduction to education with emphasis on the historical, philosophical, and structural aspects of public education with direct participation and observation of the students in the public schools.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Educ Technology & Foundations
Pre-requisites: Educ Area F permission requird AF


EDFD 7303 - Culture & Society in Education
Credits: 3.00
A critical analysis of cultural and sociological factors and their effect on issues affecting educational thought and schooling practices.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Educ Technology & Foundations


EDFD 7305 - History of American Education
Credits: 3.00
A survey of the development and patterns of public education in this country.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Educ Technology & Foundations


EDFD 7306 - Leadership Formation
Credits: 3.00
This course prepares aspiring leaders to create school learning communities capable of providing ongoing support for adult and student learning.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Educ Technology & Foundations


EDFD 7307 - Critical Issues in Education
Credits: 3.00
A study of selected issues affecting educational thought and schooling practices emphasizing critical analysis of the cultural and sociological contexts of school-societal problems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Educ Technology & Foundations


EDFD 7309 - Philosoph Foundations of Educ
Credits: 3.00
A survey of philosophical thought foundational to educational theory and practice.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Educ Technology & Foundations


EDFD 7311 - Ethics in Education
Credits: 3.00
This course provides a survey of traditional and contemporary ethics as a foundation for examining selected educational policies, practices, and case studies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Educ Technology & Foundations


EDFD 7385 - Special Topics
Credits: 3.00
Individually designed studies of educational foundations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Educ Technology & Foundations


EDFD 8371 - Adv Principles of Curriculum
Credits: 3.00
Advanced course directed toward providing students the knowledge and skill necessary for deriving principles to guide the processes of planning, designing, and evaluating curriculum in training and educational settings.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Educ Technology & Foundations



Educational Leadership

Educational Leadership


EDLE 6312 - Princ of Instructionl Leadrshp
Credits: 3.00
This course lays the foundation for the educational leadership student to transition into the role of instructional leader. The student is introduced to the theories and practices of leadership and organizational behaviors, to include vision development, and connects that knowledge to instructional leadership that facilitates school improvement. Attention is given to understanding “self as leader,” identifying core values and personal leadership styles, and practicing effective communication that facilitates positive interactions with internal and external stakeholders.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 6313 - Understanding Sys and Change
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to provide school leaders with an examination of the theoretical framework on leading organizational change for school improvement. It will focus on the systematic improvement of student achievement in the public school setting and will provide an opportunity for course related field experiences.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 6314 - School Business Management
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the planning and management functions in a school that encompasses such activities as budgeting, purchasing, storing, warehousing, records management, utilization and maintenance of the physical plant, including the needs of the handicapped. The application of the computer in the ongoing operation of the school will be emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 6316 - School Law, Policy, and Ethics
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to provide school administrators with proficiencies essential to school leaders for the effective, efficient, equitable, and ethical management of schools and districts. Students are taught to advance the best interests of all students in policy development, allocation of capital and human resources, and monitoring. Course content addresses the role of school leaders in working within the legal and policy frameworks affecting the schools and school personnel. Ethical standards for professional educator conduct are an integral part of this course.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 6318 - Human Resources Management
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on the personnel functions and responsibilities of school leaders. Students develop skills in forecasting personnel needs; recruiting, selecting, orienting, assigning, developing, compensating and evaluating personnel. Attention is given to major federal and state legislation, executive orders and court decisions that provide direction in the development of human resource programs that address the rights of diverse groups within the work force.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 6320 - Supervision of Instruction
Credits: 3.00
This course introduces the history of supervision and effective supervisory behaviors for teaching practices. Students study adult learning behaviors, supervisory models, tasks and skills of informal data collection and conferencing. Students are expected to practice these skills in on-site classrooms.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 6322 - Curriculum for Educat Leaders
Credits: 3.00
This course provides in class and field experiences for students in the investigation of current curriculum literature and in the identification and creation of organizational patterns/designs which support both short and long range school goal setting. Students will learn to coordinate and synthesize curriculum development, utilize appropriate instructional designs including delivery, management and resources, as well as to reflect on the interpretation and utilization of test results for the improvement of instructional programs.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 6323 - Promoting Teaching & Lrn
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an examination of fundamental principles of curriculum development and instructional processes for k-12 school settings. In-class and field experiences investigating curriculum processes, evaluation and change assist students as they learn to coordinate, implement and synthesize curriculum development. Appropriate instructional design including delivery, management and resources, help students reflect on the interpretation and utilization of assessment results for the improvement of instructional programs.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 6325 - Leadership Formation
Credits: 2.00
This course will examine the sources of authentic leadership: calling, connections, identity, integrity, and personal power.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 6327 - Prof Learning Communities
Credits: 3.00
This course prepares aspiring leaders to implement and sustain effective professional learning communities to provide ongoing support for adult and student learning. Aspiring leaders study functions, structures, and features of organizational culture that are essential to successfully implementing and sustaining a professional learning community. Particular attention is given to the collaborative process and establishing a clearly defined focus on teacher collaboration and student learning.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 6329 - School Ops. for Student Learn
Credits: 3.00
Students learn effective management principles for PK-12 schools in three core competencies: personnel, finance, and school safety. Using ethical frameworks when possible, emphasis is placed on aligning and developing efficient management processes that support school priorities and student learning.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 6330 - Building School Culture
Credits: 2.00
This course prepares aspiring leaders to engage school communities in creating and sustaining high performance cultures that personalize learning and set high expectations.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 6331 - Advanced Culture Seminar
Credits: 3.00
This course will provide insights into the application processes involved in cultivating collaborative and learning focused school cultures.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp
Pre-requisites: EDLE 6330


EDLE 6332 - Advanced Change & Improvement
Credits: 3.00
This course will explore how to drive and sustain organizational and academic improvement in a school setting. It will examine leadership and pedagogical changes that will promote a collegial environment focused on continuous improvement. The course will look at school reform at the building and classroom levels specifically focusing on improved instructional practices. It will also explore and analyze contemporary examples of school reform. Learning will be drawn from theory and research, from students' personal experiences, and from case studies
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp
Pre-requisites: EDLE 6313


EDLE 6341 - Using Data to Improve the Schl
Credits: 3.00
The course will provide students experiences in reviewing different types of data, analyzing data from multiple sources, and in using different methodologies of interpreting and presenting data. Students will also explore (1) the use of data within curriculum, instruction, and comprehensive school improvement efforts and (2) how to develop a data drive culture within the school.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 7304 - Admin of Special Education
Credits: 3.00
This course will provide the student an opportunity to gain an understanding of the legal and ethical requirements of complying with federal and state laws that govern the educational rights of students with disabilities. Students will also examine current educational strategies and methodologies that are designed to provide students with disabilities an appropriate education. The role of school administration in assuring compliance with the law, implementing educational programs, and evaluating those programs will be emphasized. (Cross-listed with SPED 7704).
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 7312 - School & Comm Engagement
Credits: 3.00
This course provides students with the proficiencies essential for school leaders to foster a healthy, safe, and supportive school environment that builds and sustains productive community relationships. Students are taught to promote the success and well-being for every student through collaborative engagement and the development of a shared vision for the school community.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 7316 - The Teacher and the Law
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the law that affects teachers, law established by state and federal statutes, constitution, and court decision.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 7324 - Special Education Law
Credits: 3.00
This course provides public school administrators and teachers the opportunity to examine the statutory and case law requirements of educating special populations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 7381 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
An independent study conducted under the direction of a faculty member. Advanced topics in theory, issues, trends, and techniques will be emphasized. Students will specialize in topics, studies, and projects in the area of specialty.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 7382 - Directed Readings in Education
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
The aim of the course is to allow a student to investigate an area not covered in existing courses. Such independent study requires research skills and motivation to acquire an advanced level of knowledge and understanding in the topic. An integrated research paper of the reading is required.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 7385 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Studies of topics to engage graduate students with contemporary issues and concerns related to school leadership.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 7394 - Educational Workshop
Credits: 3.00 to 9.00
These workshops allow a student to pursue an area of professional interest in greater depth and issues and new developments in the field of specialization.
Lab: 3.00 to 9.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 7395 - Educational Workshop
Credits: 3.00 to 9.00
These workshops allow a student to pursue an area of professional interest in greater depth and issues and new developments in the field of specialization.
Lab: 3.00 to 9.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 7396 - Educational Workshop
Credits: 3.00 to 9.00
These workshops allow a student to pursue an area of professional interest in greater depth and issues and new developments in the field of specialization.
Lab: 3.00 to 9.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8301 - Ed. Leadership Residency Lab I
Credits: 3.00
This is the first of a three-semester course sequence (EDLE 8301, EDLE 8302, & EDLE 8303) designed to provide students with personalized field experiences where they have the opportunity to synthesize and apply knowledge and skills as they work on problems of practice in school and district settings. Students, in collaboration with a Leader Support Team (LST), will analyze current student learning data to identify strengths and areas for improvement. The analyzed data will guide the field experiences during the second and third residency lab course.
Lab: 3.00 Other: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8302 - Ed. Leadership Resid. Lab II
Credits: 3.00
This is the second of a three-semester course sequence (EDLE 8301, EDLE 8302, & EDLE 8303) designed to provide students with personalized field experiences where they have the opportunity to synthesize and apply knowledge and skills as they work on problems of practice in school and district settings. Students, in collaboration with a Leader Support Team (LST), will develop an “Increasing Learning for All Plan” (ILA) and Literature Review that will guide the field experiences during the third residency lab course.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp
Pre-requisites: EDLE 8301


EDLE 8303 - Ed. Leadership Resid. Lab III
Credits: 3.00
This is the third of a three-semester course sequence (EDLE 8301, EDLE 8302, & EDLE 8303) designed to provide students with carefully crafted and personalized field experiences where they have the opportunity to synthesize and apply knowledge and skills as they work on problems of practice in school and district settings. Students, in collaboration with a Leader Support Team (LST), will develop an Individualized Action Research Performance Plan that will guide field experiences during each of the three residency lab courses.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp
Pre-requisites: ( EDLE 8301 and EDLE 8302 )


EDLE 8304 - Ldshp for Org Change & Imp
Credits: 3.00
Students examine leadership and pedagogical strategies that promote a collaborative and professional culture focused on continuous improvement. This course emphasizes school improvement by focusing on change theories, instructional practices, and the building of organizational culture that ensures learning for all students. Students will demonstrate proficiency by completing performance-based tasks.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8305 - Eff. Mgnt to Promote Stud Lear
Credits: 3.00
Students study and apply principles of effective operations and performance management in K-12 schools. Applying ethical principles and professional norms as the conceptual framework, students explore efficient and effective organizational functions in personnel management, safety and emergency preparedness, and the use of technology to improve operations. Students will demonstrate proficiency by completing performance-based tasks.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8306 - Inst Leadership for Improving
Credits: 3.00
This course provides educational leaders the opportunity to explore and use data-informed decision making to drive and sustain organizational and academic improvements in a school setting. Students will examine leadership and pedagogical strategies that promote a collegial environment focused on continuous improvement. Learning will be drawn from leadership theory and research on best practices, ethical principles, and professional norms in curriculum development, classroom instruction, student learning assessment, professional learning, and other areas that support the needs of all student populations in a learning-focused school environment. Students will demonstrate proficiency by completing performance-based tasks.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8311 - Instructional Leadership
Credits: 3.00
An advanced course in instructional leadership. Students will apply varying leadership styles in instructional settings depending on the developmental level of the faculty/staff being supervised. Students investigate various technical and interpersonal skills that are designed to improve the quality of instruction.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp
Pre-requisites: EDLE 6320


EDLE 8312 - School Finance & Resource Mgmt
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to provide candidates with the knowledge and skills to allocate financial and human resources in ways that promote student achievement. Candidates learn effective problem-solving skills and operational planning in the implementation of fiscal, human, and material resource procedures.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8314 - Local School Leadership
Credits: 3.00
This course examines the roles and responsibilities of school-level leaders. Effective leadership practices are examined. The course provides a balance between theory and practice while emphasizing application of problem solving strategies for educational leaders.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8316 - Educational Facilities
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to make the graduate student aware of and appreciate the relationship that exists between the total educational program and the learning environment as expressed by the physical facilities housing such a program.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8320 - Design & Cond Staff Devel Prog
Credits: 3.00
This course provides techniques and processes for planning and implementing staff improvement programs. The literature, research, and reported effective practices are explored and implementation plans and activities are developed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8322 - Law for Schl Counsel & Psychol
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to conduct an in-depth study of the law as it relates to the delivery of counseling and social services to students in a school setting. The student, working with the instructor, will research an area of interest and produce a written report.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8324 - Ethical Leadership in Educ.
Credits: 3.00
Students learn effective educational leader practices concerning ethics and professional norms. Using case studies, ethical issue structures, and discussion, students explore decision making frameworks and probe their own assumptions, values, and beliefs to develop a personal model of ethical leadership which promotes each child’s academic success and well-being.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8326 - Politics & Policy in Education
Credits: 3.00
Analyzes the politics of elementary and secondary education at the local, state, and federal level with an emphasis on Georgia issues and experiences. Contemporary issues such as local control, the expanding role of the state government in influencing policy direction are treated. The role of policy and the development of policy as they relate to politics will also be explored.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8328 - Educ Lead in Plur/Div Society
Credits: 3.00
A study of the various aspects of culture and its link to school leadership. A specific focus is made on the preparation of administrators that can help transform schools in ways that would serve the interests of groups oppressed on the basis of race, ethnicity, language, learning styles, gender, sexual orientation, social class, or disability. Limitations of traditional preparation models are investigated as well as related school reforms and restructuring movements.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8329 - Leadrshp for Equity & Exellenc
Credits: 3.00
Students study school and district leadership within the context of how effective leaders address issues related to race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, social class, disability, and language. Particular attention is given to preparation of leaders who can transform schools and districts in ways that create equitable outcomes and promote high levels of achievement for all students.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8330 - Grp Lead Tech - Admin & Superv
Credits: 3.00
This course provides experience in decision-making processes through the study of group behavior and leadership behavior, using role play, simulations, and case study methods. The role, styles, and functions of leaders are examined in the context of public education. Students learn to recognize both individual and group patterns of behavior in organizations. Interpersonal and managerial skills that are crucial to establishing a productive work climate are emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8332 - Mediating Conflict in Organiz
Credits: 3.00
This course assists students in understanding ways of managing conflict in schools and community. Attention is given to the consequences of intergroup and intragroup conflict and ways to establish productive and collaborative relations. Case studies of conflict are used to foster skills in conflict mediation and alternative dispute resolution.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8334 - Curriculum Design
Credits: 3.00
Interrelationships of various components of a curriculum design are investigated. Curriculum design is studied as a basis for decision-making in constructing instructional programs.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8336 - Curriculum Inquiry and Change
Credits: 3.00
An analysis and in-depth study of curriculum theories and the construction of new paradigms or models based on current curriculum thought. Conceptualization of the process of how fundamental change affects the culture of the school community and various emerging educational forms are also emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8338 - Clinical Techniques Supervis
Credits: 3.00
The student will develop skills of observing and analyzing teacher performance by using both qualitative and quantitative techniques, and by conducting pre and post conferences with teachers.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp
Pre-requisites: EDLE 6320


EDLE 8383 - Research Proposal-Educ Leadshp
Credits: 3.00
Students develop a working proposal for an action research project that has relevance for educational leadership. Students conduct a literature review and produce an appropriate research design.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 8386 - Advanced Internship
Credits: 3.00
Is a one-semester advanced clinical field experience which prepares students for educational leadership positions.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDLE 9004 - Teaching the Adult Learner
Credits: 3.00
This course examines theories of adult learning and practical application in the adult education process. Students will gain an understanding of andragogy and the contemporary adult education movement. Exploration of the six principles of andragogy will occur and include the: (1) learner's need to know, (2) self-concept of the learner, (3) prior experience of the learner, (4) readiness to learn, (5) orientation to learning, and (6) motivation to learn.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp
Pre-requisites: EDFD 7001



Education Math Endorsement

Education Math Endorsement


EDME 7271 - Elementary Mathematics I
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on preparing K-5 Mathematics Endorsement candidates to: understand and use the major concepts of number and operations in mathematics for K-5, including expressing, transforming, and generalizing patterns and quantitative relationships through a variety of representations; In addition, candidates will: solve problems using multiple strategies, manipulatives, and technological tools; interpret solutions; and determine reasonablesness of answers and efficiency of methods; as well select and use a variety of formative and summative assessment techniques to monitor student progress, gauge students¿ mathematical understanding, and interpret school-based progress. Must be taken concurrently with EDME 7271L.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Co-requisites: EDME 7271L


EDME 7271L - Elem Mathematcis I Lab
Credits: 1.00
Co-requisite: EDME 7271. Supervised and coordinated series of real applications of the knowledge and skills occurring in actual K-5 classroom settings that allow students to further develop and demonstrate the knowledge and skills acquired in coursework. Residency experiences shall require demonstration of the content knowledge and pedagogical skills acquired in Elementary Mathematics I.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Co-requisites: EDME 7271


EDME 7272 - Elementary Mathematics II
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on preparing K-5 Mathematics Endorsement candidates to: understand and use the major concepts of probability and data analysis for grades K-5, solve problems using multiple strategies, manipulatives, and technological tools; interpret solutions; and determine reasonableness of answers and efficiency of methods. In addition, this course will nurture collaboration, critical thinking, hands-on exploration, manipulative use, problem-based inquiry, technology utilization, and activity implementation addressing various learning styles; and will select and use a variety of formative and summative assessment techniques to monitor student progress, gauge student¿s mathematical understanding, and interpret school-based progress. Must be taken concurrently with EDME 7272L.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Co-requisites: EDME 7272L


EDME 7272L - Elementary Mathematics II Lab
Credits: 1.00
Co-requisite: EDME 7272. Supervised and coordinated series of real applications of the knowledge and skills occurring in actual K-5 classroom settings that allow students to further develop and demonstrate the knowledge and skills acquired in coursework. Residency experiences shall require demonstration of the content knowledge and pedagogical skills acquired in Elementary Mathematics II.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Co-requisites: EDME 7272


EDME 7273 - Adv Strat for Teach Elem Math
Credits: 3.00
Co-Requisiste: EDME 7273L Exploration of techniques and strategies for teaching mathematics in the elementary school, including diversity, data-driven instruction, grouping for instruction, and technology in the classroom.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Co-requisites: EDME 7273L
Pre-requisites: EDME 7271 and EDME 7272


EDME 7273L - Adv Strat Teach Elem Math Lab
Credits: 1.00
Co-Requisite: EDME 7273 Supervised and coordinated series of real applications of the knowledge and skills occurring in actual K-5 classroom settings that allow students to further develop and demonstrate the knowledge and skills acquired in coursework. Residency experiences shall require demonstration of the content knowledge and pedagogical skills acquired in Advanced Strategies for Teaching Elementary Mathematics.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Co-requisites: EDME 7273


EDME 7274 - K-5 Math Endorsement Residency
Credits: 3.00
Supervised and coordinated series of real applications of the knowledge and skills occurring in actual K-5 classroom settings that allow students to further develop and demonstrate the knowledge and skills acquired in coursework. Residency experiences shall require demonstration of the content knowledge and pedagogical skills delineated in program content standards. Authentic residency ex-periences shall occur in candidates assigned classrooms, as well as in settings other than candidates assigned classrooms to ensure experiences with diverse students and with student in the grade levels of the candidates' base certificate. The authentic residency includes a portfolio component. Successful completion of this course will allow previous program completers to convert to the new K-5 Mathematics Endorsement.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: MATH 7403 and MATH 7423 and MATH 7413 and MATH 7523



Education - Math & Sciences

Education - Math & Sciences


EDMS 6001 - Assessment for Instruction
Credits: 3.00
Course offered in partnership with Valdosta State University as part of the GOML/MATC program. Advanced study of the critical role of formative and summative assessment implementation and evaluation in an effective standards-based P-12 classroom. The course addresses knowledge of assessment theory and skill in effective practice. This course is offered in partnership with Valdosta State University as part of the GOML/MAT Program.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership & Instruction


EDMS 6105 - Transition into Teaching
Credits: 3.00
This course is part of the on-line MAT in Math & Sciences. This course will present teaching from a reflective point of view to aide students to transition into teaching from careers other than education, to reflect on personal goals and cognitive attributes and the demands of the teaching profession. Students will become familiar with the world of public education, and in doing so will spend 30 hours in a classroom setting in their content area and grade level in a local area school in order to observe and study. Course offered in partnership with Columbus State as part of GOML - MATC program.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership & Instruction


EDMS 6115 - Knowledge of Students
Credits: 3.00
Course offered in partnership with Kennesaw State University as part of GOML/MAT program. Interrelationshiups between human development, teaching, and learning, including stages theories of development and age characteristics of learners, and understanding diversity and socioeconomic differences. Meets PSC requirements for teaching children with special needs. Requires 60 hours Field Experience. Course taught as part of the GOML/MAT collaborative.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership & Instruction


EDMS 6116 - Research in Education
Credits: 3.00
This course is part of the on-line MAT in Math & Sciences. This course will provide the student with the opportunity to acquire skills, knowledge, and strategies necessary to perform action or educational research. (Course fee required.) This course is offered with CSU as part of the GOML/MAT Program.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership & Instruction


EDMS 6131 - Becoming an Advanced Teacher
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to assist teachers in developing and connecting the advanced-level of competencies in all domains of the Georgia Framework for Teaching into their teaching practices. Emphasis is placed on exploring and applying the knowledge, skills and dispositions of teaching within each domain. This course is offered in partnership with Georgia Southern University as part of the GOML/MAT program.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Curriculum and Instruction


EDMS 6216 - Practicum
Credits: 2.00
Practicum experience with students, parents, teachers and other school personnel in a public school setting under the supervision of a college staff member.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 4.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership & Instruction


EDMS 6272 - Classroom Management
Credits: 3.00
Students will examine major theoretical and empirical approaches to establish learning environments that encourage positive social interaction and active engagement in learning as well as promote self-motivation. One of the major challenges teachers face is classroom management. With the reality of larger class sizes, dwindling resources, and a diverse student population that includes students with special needs, teachers need creative cooperative classroom management skills. Field experiences are included in this course. In this course students will learn to create a productive learning environment. Students will study research related to classroom management and review the work of experts in the field to inform institutional practice. Students will explore a plethora of activities and techniques that encourage prosocial behavior and promote collaboration, teamwork, and positive teacher-student and peer relationship in classrooms. Students will practice strategies for managing student work, teaching to student strengths, and using technology in the classroom. This course will continually challenge students to examine modify current instructional practices to serve all students successfully. Course offered as part of GOML/MAT program.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership & Instruction


EDMS 6474 - Tech As a Teach/Lrn Tool
Credits: 2.00
This course is part of the on-line MAT in Mathematics/Science. EDMS is a two hour course that will provide students with an in-depth opportunity to develop deep content and knowledge in math, science and how to support understanding with technology. Standards based instructional methods and design will be used to model for teachers and their curriculum related to math and science. Hands-on technology integration techniques provide scaffolding from the student's basic computer skills to foster skills in five interrelated areas of instructional proficiency: (1) Georgia's Performance Standards for Curriculum; (2) Integration of Modern and Emerging Technologies into Instructional Practice; (3) Classroom Management in Classrooms, Computer Labs, and 21st Century Learning Environments; (4) New Designs for Teaching and Learning; and (5) Enhanced Pedagogical Practices. This course satisfies the Georgia Special Technology Requirement.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership & Instruction


EDMS 6485 - Student Teaching
Credits: 9.00
Teaching one semester in the public schools at the secondary level under the supervision of an experienced, qualified classroom teacher. Seminars are schedule as an integral part of the student teaching experience. Application for field experience required prior to enrollment.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 18.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership & Instruction



Education - Math

Education - Math


EDMT 6215 - Methods in Teach Sec Math
Credits: 5.00
This course in part of the on-line MAT in Math & Sciences. An examination of secondary mathematics curriculum, teaching strategies, assessment techniques, and resources. Emphasis on methods of teaching that promote conceptual understanding of mathematics. Course offered in partnership with Columbus State University as part of the GOML program.
Lecture: 5.00
College: College of Education
Department: Curriculum and Instruction
Co-requisites: EDMS 6216



Educational Research

Educational Research


EDRS 4042 - Intro to Classroom Assess.
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an introduction to important concepts of classroom assessment including the nature of assessment, its purposes, and essential assessment practices in relation to national/state/county-mandated assessments. Students will be able to define assessment and learn about the different types of classroom assessment, implementation of formative and summative assessments, evaluation and selection of assessments, the development of aligned assessments, and the uses of assessment to improve learning and instructional practice.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 Other: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp
Pre-requisites: CEPD 4101


EDRS 6301 - Intro to Research in Human Sci
Credits: 3.00
Students will become successful consumers of research through the introduction of principles of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods designs. Within these categories of research, students will learn the foundations of action research and single subject research.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDRS 6302 - Research Meth in Educ Studies
Credits: 3.00
The study of the general principles of qualitative, quantitative, and action research designs. Students become consumers of research in their fields and learn how to conduct research in their particular educational settings.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDRS 6303 - School-Based Research Methods
Credits: 3.00
The study of the general principles of qualitative and quantitative research designs with an emphasis on students being able to apply research methods to problems in education. The primary goal of the course is to prepare leaders to conduct and facilitate research for the purpose of school improvement. In this course, leaders will develop inquiry skills and will learn ways to lead others in the use of research based learning strategies and processes. Emphasis is placed on systematic collection of multiple forms of data to identify improvement needs, choose courses of action to meet those needs and monitor progress toward goal attainment.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDRS 6341 - Using Data To Improve Schl
Credits: 3.00
The course will provide students experiences in reviewing different types of data, analyzing data from multiple sources and in using different methodologies of interpreting and presenting data. Students will also explore (1) the use of data within curriculum, instruction, and comprehensive school improvement efforts and (2) how to develop a data drive culture within the school.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDRS 6342 - School and Classroom Assess
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to increase the school leader's knowledge and understanding of assessment and its role in improving student achievement. Students will examine the knowledge and skill base that supports the effective use of assessment within classrooms and schools. The nature and purpose of assessment, its use for improving instruction and the design of high-quality teacher-developed classroom assessments will be emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDRS 7101 - Prog Eval I: Intro to Prog Eva
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an introduction to evaluation. Topics include an overview of the history of evaluation and an introduction to important evaluation models and practices. An emphasis will be placed on defining evaluation and evaluation-specific methodological skills and practices relevant for conducting high-quality program evaluations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDRS 7102 - Prog Eval II: Prog Eval Devel
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an in-depth examination of research designs and methods appropriate for program evaluation. An emphasis will be placed on the process of developing a program evaluation proposal adhering to professional and ethical standards.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDRS 7103 - Prog Eval III: Prog Eval Imple
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods approaches to data analysis, and the process of reporting evaluation research findings. An emphasis will be placed on using software to summarize data, answer evaluation questions, and develop a comprehensive program evaluation report to applicable stakeholders.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDRS 8301 - Educational Research Design
Credits: 3.00
Students will learn the general principles of educational research and research design in qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods research. Students learn how to design, evaluate, and conduct educational research projects in their respective fields to investigate problems of practice.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp
Pre-requisites: EDRS 6301 or EDRS 6302


EDRS 8302 - Educational Rsrch: Theory&Prac
Credits: 3.00
Students will study fieldwork and data analysis techniques of qualitative, quantitative, and action research methodologies used in educational research. Students learn correct behavior when working in the field, how to collect data using a variety of methods, and common approaches for analyzing data sources and reporting findings in educational research.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp
Pre-requisites: EDRS 8301


EDRS 8303 - Qual Analysis in Ed Research
Credits: 3.00
Theories, methodologies, and findings are examined from qualitative research: educational ethnography, case study, biography, interview studies, and historical document analysis. Techniques for data collection, analysis, and presentation are studies through the design and implementation of a research project.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp
Pre-requisites: EDRS 6301 or EDRS 6302


EDRS 8304 - Data Analysis in Educ Research
Credits: 3.00
Enrollment requires approval of research proposal by program instructor and consent of EDRS instructor. This course is designed for students planning to conduct a research project as part of their specialist degree requirement. Students have the op-portunity to examine various research designs and data analysis techniques appropriate to qualitative and quantitative research methodologies. Students learn computer applications and the reporting of results in APA style.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDRS 9101 - Prog Eval I: Intro to Prog Eva
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an introduction to evaluation. Topics include an overview of the history of evaluation and an introduction to important evaluation models and practices. An emphasis will be placed on defining evaluation and evaluation-specific methodological skills and practices relevant for conducting high-quality program evaluations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDRS 9102 - Prog Eval II: Prog Eval Devel
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an in-depth examination of research designs and methods appropriate for program evaluation. An emphasis will be placed on the process of developing a program evaluation proposal adhering to professional and ethical standards.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDRS 9103 - Prog Eval III: Prog Eval Imple
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods approaches to data analysis, and the process of reporting evaluation research findings. An emphasis will be placed on using software to summarize data, answer evaluation questions, and develop a comprehensive program evaluation report to applicable stakeholders.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp



Education - Math & Sci Collab

Education - Math & Sci Collab


EDSC 6215 - Methods of Teaching Sec Scienc
Credits: 5.00
This course provides learning experiences in instructional strategies, models and methods that facilitate learning science at the secondary level. Instruction based on standards and research will be the focus of the course. Concepts and themes addressed include: understanding science inquiry, planning for instruction in science, assessment practices, diversity and special needs in the science classroom, and technology applications. Course offered in partnership with Kennesaw State University as part of the GOML/MATC Program.
Lecture: 5.00
College: College of Education
Department: Curriculum and Instruction



Education Science Endorsement

Education Science Endorsement


EDSE 7271 - Life Sci for In-Serv Elem Teac
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to reinforce and extend life science concepts for elementary teachers such that they can then design instruction that is appropriate for elementary students. The course will address basic concepts of life science using investigative, problem solving instruction. Students will be involved in concept building through discussion, laboratory, and field based experiences. Data gathering, analysis, and presentation will be a part of each topic. Additional professional resources from current literature will augment the information provided from the text and classroom discussions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


EDSE 7272 - Phy Sci for In-Serv Elem Teach
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to reinforce and extend physical science concepts for elementary teachers such that they can then design instruction that is appropriate for elementary students. The course will address basic concepts of the physical sciences using investigative, problem solving instruction. Students will be involved in concept building through discussion, laboratory, and field based experiences. Data gathering, analysis, and presentation will be a part of each topic. Additional professional resources from current literature will augment the information provided from the text and classroom discussions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


EDSE 7273 - Earth & Space Sci In-Serv Elem
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to reinforce and extend earth science concepts for elementary teachers such that they can then design instruction that is appropriate for elementary students. The course will address basic concepts of the earth sciences using investigative, problem solving instruction. Students will be involved in concept building through discussion, laboratory, and field based experiences. Data gathering, analysis, and presentation will be a part of each topic. Additional professional resources from current literature will augment the information provided from the text and classroom discussions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed


EDSE 7274 - Pedagog Strat & Res Elem Sci
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Candidates will use current research and literature related to the content, methodology, skills, and appropriate materials to explore various ways to engage K-5 children in learning life, earth, and physical sciences. Instructional approaches will be based on the premises that all students can learn science and that effective science learning occurs when students utilize the various processes of science. Through this course candidates will also develop and complete the authentic residency requirements for completion of the K-5 Science Endorsement as described in PSC Rule 505-3.69. Course prerequisites may all be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Early Childhood Through Sec Ed
Pre-requisites: EDSE 7271 and EDSE 7272 and EDSE 7273



Education School Improvement

Education School Improvement


EDSI 7385 - Spec. Topics in School Improve
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Studies of topics to engage graduate students with contemporary issues and concerns related to school improvement. Description of specific course to be inserted at time of offering. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites - Must be an active Doctoral student in the School Improvement program.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00 Lab: .00 Other: .00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDSI 9171 - Program Evaluation
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on the theories, concepts, and processes involved in planning and managing evaluations. Students will engage in evaluations in specific education situations (individual, group, organizational) using focus groups, key stakeholder interviews, survey design, data gathering, analysis and/or other methods as appropriate and analyze outcomes to make recommendations for development and/or remediation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDSI 9901 - Doctoral Seminar
Credits: 3.00
Students will evaluate scholarly research and completed dissertations for appropriate 1) research alignment, 2) organizational theoretical/conceptual frameworks, 3) program supported methodologies, 4) academic writing for doctoral-level work, and 5) APA Style.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDSI 9902 - Dissertation Mentoring Sec 2
Credits: 2.00
The purpose of this course is to continue the process of assisting candidates with moving from the role of student to that of emerging scholar and researcher through making steady progress toward completing the dissertation process. Students will understand the dissertation process and create a plan for the direction of their program of study including selecting topics of concentration, conducting research, and writing multiple dissertation plans based on a variety of research methods and approaches.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp
Co-requisites: EDSI 9998
Pre-requisites: EDSI 9901


EDSI 9903 - Dissertation Mentoring Sec 3
Credits: 2.00
The purpose of this course is to continue the process of assisting candidates with moving from the role of student to that of emerging scholar and researcher through making steady progress toward completing the dissertation process. Students will understand the dissertation process and create a plan for the direction of their program of study including selecting topics of concentration, conducting research, and writing multiple dissertation plans based on a variety of research methods and approaches.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp
Co-requisites: EDSI 9998
Pre-requisites: EDSI 9902


EDSI 9923 - Culturally Proficient Leader
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to provide educators with the opportunity to explore the theory and practical application of school reform efforts through a social justice lens with a focus on equitable outcomes for students. The structure of the course will include a survey of relevant literature from multicultural and social justice thinkers and leaders with approaches that create more inclusive classrooms and schools and equitable outcomes. Issues will be considered at multiple levels including overarching questions of multiculturalism, equity, the role of schooling, educational reform, and culturally relevant teaching and educational practices. In addition, students will examine their own attitudes as well as the impact of policy and practice decisions on the students and communities they serve.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDSI 9925 - Policy Analysis for Sch Impr
Credits: 3.00
This course is an advanced study of educational policy; the intersection of policy, law, and ethics; and the impact of these on education broadly and school improvement specifically. It is designed to enable educators to become knowledgeable, effective, and responsible actors within the political context of schooling.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDSI 9933 - Leadership for Change
Credits: 3.00
This course addresses the theories and processes of change in societies, cultures, and organizations with particular emphasis on change within the educational systems. Completion of this course will enable students to effectively use theories and processes in their role as change agents within their own educational environments. Change strategies that lead to school improvement are emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDSI 9941 - Org Theories & Schl Imprvmnt
Credits: 3.00
Students build a conceptual understanding of the knowledge base that shapes organizations, human behavior in organizations, and school improvement. Students learn current theories of administration, contributions of behavioral science research to solving administrative problems, and the implication of theoretical orientations to school improvement. Organizational climate and culture, socialization and human behavior, and decision making are key themes. A course focus includes learning the dimensions of organizational qualities that contribute to school improvement as well as strategies to recognize and address any dysfunction that inhibits organizational functions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDSI 9942 - Adv Inst Prac to Improve Schls
Credits: 3.00
Students learn to improve curriculum and instruction in K-12 schools by examining the relationship between curriculum, instructional improvement, and teacher development. Students discover the changing role of an instructional leader as it relates to the instructional program and its impact on school improvement. Students will investigate pertinent research and best practices in instructional leadership, learning theory, climate and culture, effective teaching methods, and professional development.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDSI 9943 - Adv Pric of School Improvement
Credits: 3.00
Students will investigate pedagogies, structures, organizational models, curricular approaches, and the research that supports authentic school improvement. Attention is given to implementation processes and how to systematically extend improvements to scale. Students will examine these concepts in the context of school turnarounds, innovative practices, school reform, and high-performing schools.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDSI 9960 - Research Design
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an overview of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research designs. Students will learn the fundamental components of research design including developing research questions, reviewing scholarly literature, exploring theory and theoretical frameworks, and the role of ethics in educational research.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDSI 9961 - Quantitative Research Methods
Credits: 3.00
This course introduces the graduate student to basic methods of empirical inquiry used in education, nursing, and related social sciences. Quantitative research designs commonly used in these disciplines are emphasized. Students will learn how to select samples, identify appropriate measurement instruments, analyze data descriptively, and apply a variety of inferential statistical tests to answer research questions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDSI 9962 - Qualitative Research Methods
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on the use of qualitative methods of research, including theoretical perspectives and methods of collection and analysis of qualitative data sources in educational studies. It emphasizes analysis of work samples, observations, inquiry data, artifacts, and other sources of data. Students become skilled at using methods of qualitative research to evaluate school improvement issues. In addition, students examine strategies for thematic and other forms of analysis of observational and inquiry data. Throughout the course students collect and analyze school improvement data.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDSI 9963 - Action Research for Change I
Credits: 3.00
This course begins a two semester site-based research experience during which students conduct a school improvement project. Students reflect on practice to identify a research problem, conduct a review of literature to provide a theoretical base for their studies, develop research questions, and plan methods for data collection and implementation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDSI 9964 - Advanced Research Seminar
Credits: 3.00
In this course students will strategically begin data collection and analysis processes for their individual research studies. Students will learn how to interpret and write results, discussions, and implications for their studies related to existing literature and theoretical frameworks.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp


EDSI 9998 - Research for Doc Dissertation
Credits: 1.00 to 5.00
Students develop and carry out an independent research project in school improvement. A minimum of nine semester hours in this course is required for graduation. Continuous enrollment is required while working on the dissertation project. Prerequisites: Consent of dissertation chairperson and admission to candidacy.
Lecture: 1.00 to 5.00
College: College of Education
Department: Leadership, Research & Sch Imp



Education

Education


EDUC 2110 - Inv Crit and Contem Issues-Edu
Credits: 3.00
This course engages students in observations, interactions and analyses of critical and contemporary educational issues. Students will investigate issues influencing the social and political contexts of educational settings in Georgia and the United States. Student will actively examine the teaching profession from multiple vantage points both within and outside the school. Against this backdrop, students will reflect on and interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a diverse culture and examine the moral and ethical responsibilities of teaching in a democracy. A field component totaling 10 hours is required.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Education Dean's Office


EDUC 2120 - Exp Sociocult. Persp on Div Ed
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to equip future teachers with the fundamental knowledge of understanding culture and teaching children from diverse backgrounds. A field component totaling 10 hours is required.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Education Dean's Office


EDUC 2130 - Expl Learning and Teaching
Credits: 3.00
Explore key aspects of learning and teaching through examining your own learning processes and those of others, with the goal of applying your knowledge to enhance the learning of all students in a variety of educational settings and contexts. A field component totaling 10 hours is required.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Education Dean's Office



English

English


ENGL 0999 - Support for English Comp
CEUs: 1.00 to 3.00
This Learning Support course provides corequisite support in reading and writing for students enrolled in ENGL 1101 – English Composition I. Topics will parallel those being studied in ENGL 1101 and the essential reading and writing skills needed to be successful in ENGL 1101. Taken with ENGL 1101, this is a composition course focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation, and also including introductory use of a variety of research skills.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Co-requisites: ENGL 1101


ENGL 1101 - English Composition I
Credits: 3.00
Composition course focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis and argumentation, and also including introductory use of a variety of research skills. Prerequisites: All English as a Second Language students must have exited from all English as a Second Language courses. All learning support students must have completed all reading and writing required remediation. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: Learning Support English 3


ENGL 1101L - English Composition Lab
Credits: 1.00
This lab provides co-requisite support in reading and writing for students enrolled in ENGL 1101 – English Composition I. Topics will parallel those being studied in ENGL 1101 and the essential reading and writing skills needed to be successful in ENGL 1101. Taken with ENGL 1101, this is a composition course focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation, and also including introductory use of a variety of research skills.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Co-requisites: ENGL 1101


ENGL 1102 - English Composition II
Credits: 3.00
A composition course that develops writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101 that emphasizes interpretation and evaluation, and that incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods. Prerequisites: C or better in ENGL 1101. Completed ENGL 1101 within the past five years. Passed the home institution's computer literacy requirements. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1101 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL Placmnt Exam-Place 1102 2 or ENG 101 Minimum Grade: C


ENGL 2001 - Introduction to Literature
CEUs: 3.00
A course that introduces students to the conventions of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, drama, and film with the goal of developing collegiate-level reading and interpretation skills. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Area C.2.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 2050 - Self-Staging:Oral Com Dly Life
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the performative basis of oral communication and self-presentation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 2060 - Intro to Creative Writing
Credits: 3.00
This course serves and an introduction to the art of creative writing - from learning the elements involved in literary production, to gaining the critical skills necessary in assessing works by established authors, to crafting some of your own literary artifacts. Students will study the process of creative writing from a wide range of historical and cultural examples, and learn to model their artistic endeavors on the works of publishing practitioners. They will also investigate the convergence of creative personal experience and creativity and the reception of literary arts in the public domain. May count for credit in Core Area C.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 2080 - Intro. to the Art of Film
Credits: 3.00
A consideration of the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. This is an introductory course that assumes no prior knowledge of film.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL Placmnt Exam-Credit 1102 X


ENGL 2110 - World Literature
Credits: 3.00
A survey of important works of world literature. Required for English majors. Course equivalents ENGL 2111 and ENGL 2112.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL Placmnt Exam-Credit 1102 X


ENGL 2111 - World Literature I
Credits: 3.00
A survey of important works of world literature from ancient times through the mid-seventeenth century. Prerequisites: ENGL 1102. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ( ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL Placmnt Exam-Credit 1102 X ) and ( eCore Introduction Quiz C or eCore Course C )


ENGL 2112 - World Literature II
Credits: 3.00
World Literature II is a survey of important works of world literature from the mid-seventeenth century to the present.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: eCore Introduction Quiz C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


ENGL 2120 - British Literature
Credits: 3.00
A survey of important works of British literature. Required for English majors.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL Placmnt Exam-Credit 1102 X


ENGL 2130 - American Literature
Credits: 3.00
A survey of important works of American Literature. Required for English majors. Course equivalents ENGL 2131 and ENGL 2132.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL Placmnt Exam-Credit 1102 X


ENGL 2131 - American Literature I
Credits: 3.00
A survey of American literature from the pre-colonial age to the mid-nineteenth century.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: eCore Introduction Quiz C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


ENGL 2132 - American Literature II
Credits: 3.00
This course will present a broad overview of American literature from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Students will utilize various critical approaches and reading strategies as they examine important authors and themes of this period. The course will pay special attention to multiple cultures and perspectives. Some of the authors that will be included in this course are Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, Mark Twain, Langston Hughes, Kate Chopin, Maxine Hong, Robert Frost, and Raymond Carver. Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C and ( eCore Introduction Quiz C or eCore Course C )


ENGL 2180 - African-American Literature
Credits: 3.00
An examination of representative African-American literary texts, with particular attention to the defining aesthetic principles of the tradition.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL Placmnt Exam-Credit 1102 X


ENGL 2190 - Literature by Women
Credits: 3.00
An exploration of significant literary texts by female authors, with particular attention to the emergence of what might be called a female aesthetic and issues of gender identity.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL Placmnt Exam-Credit 1102 X


ENGL 2XXX - University Syst Studies Abroad
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00

Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 3000 - Research and Methodology
Credits: 3.00
A gateway course that introduces students to representative critical approaches that they will encounter in the major. Emphasis will be given to research skills, methodology and analytical writing. Required for the major and minor in English. Only six hours of upper division work may be taken before the completion of this course. Enrollment requires permission of academic coordinator. Not offered in the summer session.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102


ENGL 3160 - Philosophy in Literature& Film
Credits: 3.00
An examination of significant philosophical, literary, and filmic texts in terms of their thematic and/or conceptual interconnections. Same as PHIL 3160.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL Placmnt Exam-Credit 1102 X


ENGL 3200 - Intermediate Creative Writing
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the genre-specific workshop in either fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, screenwriting, or play writing. May be repeated up to 6 hours as topics vary. No more than 2 courses may be counted toward the major in English. Pre-requisites: ENGL 2060 or XIDS 2100 (The Creative Process).
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 2060


ENGL 3300 - Studies in American Culture
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to American studies as an area of critical inquiry, including a study of the theories and methods used in the field and readings of significant works that have shaped it. Required for the minor in American Studies. Same as HIST 3300. (No more than two [2] 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.)
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 ) and ENGL 2130


ENGL 3350 - Intro to Africana Studies
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to Africana studies as an area of critical inquiry, including a study of the theories and methods used in the field and readings of significant works that have shaped it. Required for the minor in Africana studies. Same as HIST 3350.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 3400 - Pedagogy and Writing
Credits: 3.00
This class serves as a survey of major foundational philosophies and pedagogical practices in the field of Rhetoric and Composition. The course works to connect such theories to meaningful practice in the instruction of writing. Built in components include research, both reflective and theoretical writing, and field experiences in both college classrooms and the University Writing Center.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 3405 - Professional & Technical Wrtng
Credits: 3.00
Intensive practice in composing powerful audience-driven documents in a variety of real-world business, professional and technical contexts. Students will also learn how to make effective business-related presentations supported with appropriate documentary and visual aids.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 3410 - Technology for Editors/Writers
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to help students become proficient in the technologies useful in classrooms and in the work world that editors and writers will encounter. As such, its content will change as new technologies develop and are adopted in these arenas. Students in the course will demonstrate familiarity with the kind of technologies useful to editors and writers in the classroom and work world; apply these technologies to common tasks, such as creating a document, editing a file, developing a slide show, building a simple website, populating a spreadsheet, developing a web page, sending an email, or flowing a manuscript into a proof; and choose the correct technology for the task assigned.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102


ENGL 3415 - Multimodal Comp in the Wrkplc
CEUs: 3.00
This course instructs students in multimodal composition, which combines the written and spoken word with visual, aural, spatial, and gestural communication modes, with an emphasis on the application of the subject to modern professional contexts. Topics include multimodal composition principles, data-oriented writing, visual rhetoric, and professional multimodal texts, among others.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102


ENGL 4000 - Studies in British Lit. I
Credits: 3.00
Topics rotate: Medieval Literature: An examination of medieval English literature in its various aspects, considering texts intheir historical context. Renaissance Literature: An investigation of Renaissance literature in its various aspects, including, but not limited to, poetry, prose, and drama, and a consideration of that literature as a part and product of its historical period. Seventeenth Century British Literature: An investigation of significant issues, themes, and ideologies in selections of seventeenth-century British literature studied in terms of their original cultural context. Eighteenth Century British Literature: A topic-centered examination of drama, fiction, poetry and other textual expression from Restoration and eighteenth-century Britain. Works may be studies in their historical, political, cultural and aesthetic context.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 Other: .00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 3000


ENGL 4002 - Studies in British Lit. II
Credits: 3.00
Topics rotate: British Romanticism: An investigation of issues, themes, and ideologies in selections of British Romantic literature studies in terms of their original cultural context. Victorian Literature: An in-depth analysis of Victorian literature in its original historical, political, cultural and aesthetic contexts. Twentieth-Century British Literature: An in-depth examination of selected twentieth-century texts from the British Isles studied in the context of relevant social, political and cultural issues. Contemporary British and American Literature: An examination of selected texts produced in the last thirty years in the British Isles and the United States.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 Other: .00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 3000


ENGL 4003 - Studies in American Lit. I
Credits: 3.00
Topics rotate: Colonial and Early American Literature: An examination of representative literary works from exploration and discovery through the era of the new American republic. American Romanticism: An examination of representative American literary works from the nineteenth century through the Civil War. American Realism and Naturalism: An examination of the American literary arts based in an aesthetic of accurate, unromanticized observation/representation of life and nature that flourished in the post-Civil War era.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 Other: .00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 3000


ENGL 4005 - Studies in American Lit. II
Credits: 3.00
Topics Rotate: Twentieth-Century American Literature: An in-depth examination of ideas and issues prevalent in twentieth-century American literature in its historical, political, cultural and aesthic context. Contemporary British and American Literature: An examination of selected texts produced in the last thirty years in the Brish Isles and the United States.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 Other: .00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 3000


ENGL 4106 - Studies in Genre
Credits: 3.00
An intensive examination of the formal, social, cultural and historical contexts of a single literary genre as well as the theoretical concerns that underlie its analysis. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 4108 - Studies in the Novel
Credits: 3.00
This course will emphasize the development of the British novel from the seventeenth century through the present or the American novel from the late eighteenth century through the present in relation to literary, cultural, intellectual, technological, and aesthetic changes in Britain or America.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 4109 - Film as Literature
Credits: 3.00
An examination of films as texts through historical, aesthetic, thematic, and/or cultural questioning and analysis. Typical offerings may include Film and the Novel; Representations of Women in Film, Teen Cultures in Film, etc. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 4170 - Studies in African-Amer Lit
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the African-American tradition in literature.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 4180 - Studies in Regional Literature
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the literature of a specific region and the forces that shape its regional literary identity within the larger national contexts of the British Isles or the United States. Frequent offerings in Southern literature will rotate with other topics. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 4185 - Studies in Literature by Women
Credits: 3.00
An investigation of aesthetic and cultural issues pertinent to the production of literature by women. Typical offerings will rotate among topics related to literature by women in the United States, the British Isles, or other parts of the world. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 4188 - Studies in Individual Authors
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the career of a single literary figure in the context of literary history. Frequent offerings in Shakespeare and Chaucer will rotate with courses in a variety of other figures from several literary traditions. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Shakespeare may be taken for up to six (6) hours, if topic varies, with department chair's permission.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 4210 - Advanced Creative Writing
Credits: 3.00
An intensive writing experience in one of the following genres: fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, screenwriting, or playwriting. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ( ENGL 3200 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 306 Minimum Grade: C ) and ENGL 2060


ENGL 4238 - Methods for Teach Secondry Eng
Credits: 4.00
This compulsory course, taught by English Department faculty, unites theory and practice to produce sound pedagogical strategies for the teaching of English. In it, teachers-in-training will learn refined instructional strategies and deepen their understanding of the foundation from which such approaches develop. As a result, they will begin to fashion teaching selves through recursive discussion, concentrated research, analytical writing, repeated field observation, and practical implementation.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 3000 Minimum Grade: C and Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE and SEED 4271 and SEED 4271L


ENGL 4286 - Teaching Internship
Credits: 9.00
This course involves teaching one semester in the public schools at the secondary level in English under the supervision of an experienced, qualified English teacher. Seminars in English secondary education are scheduled as an integral part of the student teaching experience and will provide students with numerous and varied opportunities to plan, deliver, evaluate, and revise secondary English educational strategies. Such a learning environment, based on developing best practices and sound pedagogical modeling in the field, serve as part of an ongoing and comprehensive portfolio assessment process.
Other: 18.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


ENGL 4295 - Studies in Young Adult Lit.
Credits: 3.00
An examination of a wide range of literary texts appropriate for use in grades 7-12, focused so that students will develop an understanding of the basic reading processes, including reading assessment, comprehension strategies, and techniques for corrective reading, as well as a series of effective methodologies for promoting the critical appreciation of literature. Also covered are issues relating to the rights and responsibilities of various groups (including teachers, school administrators, and parents) involved in designing and implementing a literature curriculum.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 4300 - Studies In English Language
Credits: 3.00
A sustained analysis of a particular linguistic theme, an approach to, or a regional expression of the English language. Regular offerings in the history of the English language and its development from Anglo-Saxon to contemporary varieties of world English and in English grammar will rotate with other topics. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 4304 - Advncd Writing in Disciplines
CEUs: 3.00
Advanced composition course focusing on syntactical and rhetorical skills necessary for effective communication in a variety of professional settings and disciplines. Students will study the principles of sentence construction and persuasion, and learn to perform structural and functional analyses of both in order to address particular audiences in specific situations. They will also explore the relationship between multimodality and accessibility in the creation and reception of meaning. Can be taken in lieu of ENGL 4300 for purposes of Publishing and Editing Certificate and English B.A., Education Track. Open to non-majors.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102


ENGL 4310 - Studies in Literary Theory
Credits: 3.00
An examination of a particular facet of or approach to literary theory and/or criticism. Typical offerings may include History of Literary Theory, Cultural Studies, Feminist Theory, Comparative Literature, etc. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 4381 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Guided investigation of a topic not addressed by regularly scheduled courses. Students must propose a detailed plan of readings, articulating precise learning objectives, and secure the written consent of both a supervising instructor and of the department chair. Not more than one (1) Independent Study may count toward the major in English without the chair's permission.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 4384 - Senior Seminar
Credits: 3.00
A capstone seminar designed to integrate students' learning in the discipline. Required for the English major. Not offered during the summer session.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 3000


ENGL 4385 - Special Topics
Credits: 3.00
An examination of a topic in literature, theory, and/or writing that transcends the boundaries of the fixed curriculum. Typical offerings might include Literary Representations of the War in Vietnam, Nature Writing and the Environment, and Representations of Aging in Literature. Requires permission of the department chair to repeat.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 4386 - Internship
Credits: 3.00
A supervised practicum within a career-related setting that is writing-, editing-, tutoring-, and/or teaching-intensive. Enrollment is contingent on approval of proposed internship activities by both instructor and department chair.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 4405 - Publishing and Editing
Credits: 3.00
This course is focused on introducing students to the world of publishing and professionalizing students as editors, helping students learn or hone the skills they’ll need to edit (at all levels—content, sentence, punctuation) their own and others’ work, and assisting them to develop documents and credentials to present to a potential employer.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 3410 and ENGL 4300


ENGL 4415 - Ethics & Prac Wrkplc Writing
CEUs: 3.00
This course will equip students with the skills and qualifications needed to discern and articulate shifting ethical landscapes, to identify and participate in debates appropriate to a representative sampling of industries, and to write measured, informed responses to important ethical questions, focusing on how ethical decision-making affects the workplace documents they will develop. Emphasizing the planning, revising, and editing processes, this capstone course will instruct students how to construct appropriate documents to accommodate workplace values and value conflicts—all within common institutional practice.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 3410 and ENGL 3415


ENGL 5000 - Studies in British Lit. I
Credits: 3.00
Topics rotate: Medieval Literature: An examination of medieval English literature in its various aspects, considering texts in their historical context. Renaissance Literature: An investigation of Renaissance literature in its various aspects, including, but not limited to, poetry, prose, and drama, and a consideration of that literature as a part and product of its historical period. Seventeenth Century British Literature: An investigation of significant issues, themes, and ideologies in selections of seventeenth-century British literature studied in terms of their original cultural context. Eighteenth Century British Literature: A topic-centered examination of drama, fiction, poetry and other textual expression from Restoration and eighteenth-century Britain. Works may be studies in their historical, political, cultural and aesthetic context. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5002 - Studies in British Lit. II
Credits: 3.00
Topics rotate: British Romanticism: An investigation of issues, themes, and ideologies in selections of British Romantic literature studies in terms of their original cultural context. Victorian Literature: An in-depth analysis of Victorian literature in its original historical, political, cultural and aesthetic contexts. Twentieth-Century British Literature: An in-depth examination of selected twentieth-century texts from the British Isles studied in the context of relevant social, political and cultural issues. Contemporary British and American Literature: An examination of selected texts produced in the last thirty years in the British Isles and the United States. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5003 - Studies in American Lit. I
Credits: 3.00
Topics rotate: Colonial and Early American Literature: An examination of representative literary works from exploration and discovery through the era of the new American republic. American Romanticism: An examination of representative American literary works from the nineteenth century through the Civil War. American Realism and Naturalism: An examination of the American literary arts based in an aesthetic of accurate, unromanticized observation/representation of life and nature that flourished in the post-Civil War era. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5005 - Studies in American Lit. II
Credits: 3.00
Topics Rotate: Twentieth-Century American Literature: An in-depth examination of ideas and issues prevalent in twentieth-century American literature in its historical, political, cultural and aesthetic context. Contemporary British and American Literature: An examination of selected texts produced in the last thirty years in the British Isles and the United States. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5106 - Studies in Genre
Credits: 3.00
An intensive examination of the formal, social, cultural and historical contexts of a single literary genre as well as the theoretical concerns that underlie its analysis. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5108 - Studies in the Novel
Credits: 3.00
This course will emphasize the development of the British novel from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries or the American novel from the late eighteenth through the twentieth centuries in relation to literary, cultural, intellectual, technological, and aesthetic changes in Britain or America. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5109 - Film as Literature
Credits: 3.00
An examination of films as texts through historical, aesthetic, thematic, and/or cultural questioning and analysis. Typical offerings may include Film and the Novel; Representations of War in Film; Film Censorship and the Marketplace; etc. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5170 - Studies in African-Amer Lit
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the African-American tradition in literature.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5180 - Studies in Regional Literature
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the literature of a specific region and the forces that shape its regional literary identity within the larger national contexts of the British Isles or the United States. Frequent offerings in Southern literature will rotate with other topics. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5185 - Studies in Literature by Women
Credits: 3.00
An investigation of aesthetic and cultural issues pertinent to the production of literature by women. Typical offerings will rotate among topics related to literature by women in the United States, the British Isles, or other parts of the world. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5188 - Studies in Individual Authors
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the career of a single literary figure in the context of literary history. Frequent offerings in Shakespeare and Chaucer will rotate with courses in a variety of other figures from several literary traditions. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Shakespeare may be taken for up to six (6) hours, if topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5210 - Advanced Creative Writing
Credits: 3.00
An intensive experience in writing in one of the following genres: fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, or screenwriting. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5295 - Studies in Young Adult Lit.
Credits: 3.00
An advanced examination of a wide range of literary texts appropriate for use in grades 7-12, focused so that students will develop an understanding of the basic reading processes, including reading assessment, comprehension strategies, and techniques for corrective reading, as well as a series of effective methodologies for promoting the critical appreciation of literature. Also covered are issues relating to the rights and responsibilities of various groups including teachers, school administrators, and parents involved in designing and implementing a literature curriculum.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5300 - Studies in English Language
Credits: 3.00
A sustained analysis of a particular linguistic theme, an approach to, or a regional expression of the English language. Regular offerings in the history of the English language and its development from Anglo-Saxon to contemporary varieties of world English and in English grammar will rotate with other topics. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5304 - Advncd Writing in Disciplines
CEUs: 3.00
Advanced composition course focusing on syntactical and rhetorical skills necessary for effective communication in a variety of professional settings and disciplines. Students will study the principles of sentence construction and persuasion, and learn to perform structural and functional analyses of both in order to address particular audiences in specific situations. They will also explore the relationship between multimodality and accessibility in the creation and reception of meaning. Open to all MA students.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5310 - Studies in Literary Theory
Credits: 3.00
An examination of a particular facet of or approach to literary theory and/or criticism. Typical offerings may include History of Literary Theory, Cultural Studies, Feminist Theory, Comparative Literature, etc. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5381 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Guided investigation of a topic not addressed by regularly scheduled courses. Students must propose a detailed plan of readings, articulating precise learning objectives, and secure the written consent of both a supervising instructor and of the department chair. Not more than one (1) Independent Study may count toward the M.A. in English without the chair's permission.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5383 - Rdg for the Comprehensive Exam
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
This course allows students to participate in regular colloquia conducted by faculty and in one-on-one study sessions with faculty in preparation for the comprehensive oral exam which is based on a reading list approved by the graduate faculty in English. Designed to supplement the student's independent reading for the comprehensive exam, this course may be taken as often as the student chooses, but does not count toward the M.A. English degree. Students must see Director of Graduate Studies for permission to register.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5385 - Special Topics
Credits: 3.00
An examination of a topic in literature, theory, and/or writing that transcends the boundaries of the fixed curriculum. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 5386 - Internship
Credits: 3.00
A supervised practicum within a career-related setting that is writing-, editing-, tutoring-, and/or teaching-intensive. Enrollment is contingent on approval of proposed internship activities by both instructor and department chair.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 6105 - Seminar in British Lit I
Credits: 3.00
A tightly focused examination of some aspect of pre-nineteenth-century British literature in its historical, ideological, and/or cultural context. The topic for this course varies. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 6110 - Seminar in American Lit I
Credits: 3.00
A tightly focused examination of some aspect of pre-Civil War American literature in its historical, ideological, and/or cultural context. The topic for this course varies. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 6115 - Seminar in British Lit II
Credits: 3.00
A tightly focused examination of some aspect of post-nineteenth-century British literature in its historical, ideological, and/or cultural context. The topic for this course varies. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 6120 - Seminar in American Lit II
Credits: 3.00
A tightly focused examination of some aspect of post-Civil War American literature in its historical, ideological, and/or cultural context. The topic for this course varies. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 6385 - Seminar in Special Topics
Credits: 3.00
Study of a specific theme, critical approach, and/or concept that transcends boundaries established by the other 6000-level offerings in the program. Typical offerings may include Transatlantic Influences in Modernist Literature, Literature of Migration and Settlement, and Theory and Praxis of Creative Writing. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


ENGL 6399 - Thesis
Credits: 3.00
Research and preparation of an M.A. thesis under the supervision of an approved faculty advisor. Must be taken in the semester(s) the thesis project is prepared and submitted.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy



Engineering

Engineering


ENGR 1113 - Introduction to Engineering
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the field of engineering.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Physics


ENGR 1173 - Comp Graph/Vis Comm & Eng Desg
Credits: 3.00
Computer-aided engineering design fundamentals. Projection theory, sketching, creative design, and geometric modeling.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Physics


ENGR 3113 - Statics
Credits: 3.00
Elements of statics in one, two, and three dimensions, centroids, analysis of structures and machines, friction.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Physics


ENGR 3123 - Dynamics
Credits: 3.00
The kinematics and kinetics of particles and extended rigid bodies moving in a plane.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Physics


ENGR 3133 - Mechanics of Deformable Bodies
Credits: 3.00
Definition and analysis of stress and strain, applications to axially loaded elements, torsion of circular shafts and beam bending, plasticity, column stability.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Physics


ENGR 3810 - Chemical Process Principles
Credits: 3.00
An introductory engineering approach to material and energy balance for physical and chemical processes is developed. Gas behavior, systems of units, material properties, and thermophysical and thermochemical concepts are discussed. Emphasis is on the application of material and energy balances to steady and unsteady state physical and chemical processes. Same as CHEM 3810.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry
Co-requisites: PHYS 2212


ENGR 3830 - Engineering Thermodynamics
Credits: 3.00
An introductory engineering approach to thermodynamics for physical and chemical processes is developed. Applications of first and second laws, engines, refrigeration and compression cycles, equations of states, fluid properties, corresponding states will be emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


ENGR 3885 - Selected Topics in Chem Enginr
Credits: 1.00 to 15.00
On successful completion of this course, the student will be able to understand and apply specific principles of science and engineering to chemical engineering problems.
Lecture: 1.00 to 15.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry



Environmental

Environmental


ENVS 2202 - Environmental Science
Credits: 3.00
This course is an interdisciplinary course integrating principles from biology, chemistry, ecology, geology, and non-science disciplines as related to the interactions of humans and their environment. Issues of local, regional, and global concern will be used to help students explain scientific concepts and analyze practical solutions to complex environmental problems. Emphasis is placed on the study of ecosystems, human population growth, energy, pollution, and other environmental issues and important environmental regulations. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Chemistry


ENVS 4886 - Internship
Credits: 3.00 to 6.00
The Internship provides students an opportunity to gain supervised work experience in an agency in their major area of study. Repeatable up to 6 hours. Requires consent of advisor.
Other: 3.00 to 6.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Sociology


ENVS 4900 - Senior Capstone
Credits: 3.00 to 4.00
Students may elect to complete a laboratory or field research project, an academic service- learning project (internship) or other research relevant to career objectives. Content of project must focus on issue or problem within the state of Georgia. they will present the results of their projects in a professional conference format.
Lab: 3.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Arts & Sciences Dean's Office


ENVS 4981 - Directed Study
Credits: 3.00
Directed Study affords students an opportunity to pursue work in academic areas that go beyond courses they have already completed or to pursue work in areas where specific courses are not offered.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Arts & Sciences Dean's Office



Electronic Technology

Electronic Technology


ETEC 1101 - Electronic Tech in Educ Enviro
Credits: 1.00 to 2.00
This course is an introduction to using personal computers to communicate with individuals and organizations and to access, store, and analyze information. Emphasis is on exploring the role of technology in present and future learning experiences. Topics include the digital divide, virtual communities, telecommuting, job search and readiness, e-commerce, globalization, privacy versus security, and intellectual property in cyberspace. Students will use their practical technology skills to create word-processed documents, an electronic presentation, and a Web page. Prerequisites: Beginning level skill in Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint. Exited Learning Support in Reading and English. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/
Lecture: 1.00 to 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: eCore Introduction Quiz C or eCore Course C



European Union

European Union


EURO 3234 - Introduction to the EU
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the history, institutions, and policies of the European Union. The course also examines the role of the EU as a global actor, including its relations with the United States.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Political Science/Planning


EURO 4130 - EU Law & Legal Systems
Credits: 3.00
A study of EU legal institutions and processes in the context of international law and in comparison to those of the United States.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Political Science/Planning


EURO 4160 - Fed. & Multi Govern. in the EU
Credits: 3.00
A comparison of multilevel governance and policymaking in the European Union with that of the United States and other federal systems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Political Science/Planning


EURO 4230 - Doing Business in the EU
Credits: 3.00
A study of business protocol in the EU compared to the United States. The course focuses on institutions and rules which impact the business environment for domestic and international firms, and on how political decisions affect the business environment.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Political Science/Planning


EURO 4260 - European Monetary Union
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the history and evolution of the European Economic and Monetary Union and its impact on the United States and the global economy.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Political Science/Planning


EURO 4330 - EU Science & Technology Policy
Credits: 3.00
An examination of EU science and technology policy compared to that of the United States. The course examines how governments can encourage scientific and technological innovation and whether government can (or should) try to limit or control technological innovation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Political Science/Planning


EURO 4430 - EU Environmental Policy
Credits: 3.00

Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Department: Political Science/Planning


EURO 4530 - European Social Policy
Credits: 3.00
This course examines the history of social policy in the European Union, and the course focuses on the current social policy arrangements in Europe and in the European Union. We will examine gender policy, education, child care, elder care, and other policies in the context of improving social conditions in the domestic policy arena.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Political Science/Planning


EURO 4630 - Communications and Media
Credits: 3.00
A comparison of communications and media in the EU with the United States. The course examines media law, policies, and practices in voice telephony, the Internet, and social media.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Political Science/Planning


EURO 4730 - EU Foreign Policy
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the foreign policy of the EU. Examines how EU foreign policy is made, the intersection of national and EU foreign policies, and EU policies regarding key issues in countries and areas of the world.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Political Science/Planning


EURO 4760 - US-EU Relations
Credits: 3.00
An examination of relations between the United States and the European Union, including US-EU cooperation on global issues and the future of Transatlantic relations in a changing world.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Political Science/Planning


EURO 4830 - EU and Latin America
Credits: 3.00
An examination of relations between the EU and Latin America. This is the capstone course for students in the EU Studies certificate program. The course explores selected topics in a way that allows students to synthesize their knowledge of the EU.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Social Sciences
Department: Political Science/Planning



Film

Film


FILM 1000 - Georgia Film Academy I
Credits: 6.00
This course is the first of a two-course certificate program which will provide an introduction to the skills used in on-set film production, including all forms of narrative media which utilize film-industry standard organizational structure, professional equipment and on-set procedures. In addition to the use of topical lectures, PowerPoint presentations, videos and hand-outs, the course will include demonstrations of equipment and set operations as well as hands-on learning experiences. Students will: 1. Identify and describe film production organizational structure. 2. Define job descriptions in various film craft areas, names, uses, and protocols. 3. Explain the connections between these areas, names, uses, and protocols on-set. 4. Operate full lighting and grip equipment. 5. Summarize the above knowledge for purposes of self-marketing.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy


FILM 2000 - Georgia Film Academy II
Credits: 6.00
This course is the second of a two-course certificate program designed specifically to provide students with a basic level of on-set film production skills, knowledge and experience with film-industry standard organizational structure, professional equipment and on-set procedures. The skills and knowledge gained in Course I will form a foundation for students to be able to perform at an entry-level on working productions. This course will focus on professional-level productions, on which students will have roles in on-set and pre-production crafts. Students will: 1. Demonstrate knowledge of on-set protocols and relationships. 2. Demonstrate basic abilities in multiple entry-level on-set jobs.* 3. Interpret and apply instructions from on-set supervisors. 4. Summarize the above experiences for purposes of self-marketing. *May include Camera, Lighting, Electrical, Security, Second Unit Director/Assistant Director, Art Department (Set Decorator/dressing, Production Design, Props), Set Construction, Makeup/Hair Department, Wardrobe Department, Sound Department, Post-Production (editing), Production Assistant, Locations, Script Supervisor (Continuity), Production Office, Production Accounting.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Co-requisites:


FILM 2080 - Intro to the Art of Film
Credits: 3.00
Students will consider the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. Students will watch a wide range of films from a variety of countries and historical moments in film history and will have the chance to explore many issues such as framing, photographic space, film shot, editing, sound, genre, narrative form, acting style, and lighting in the context of wider discussions of the weekly films. This is an introductory course and assumes no prior knowledge of film. Students will be evaluated primarily on the basis of weekly postings, a shot-by-shot analysis, and exams. Weekly screening on Monday nights.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1101


FILM 2100 - History and Theory of Film
Credits: 3.00
This course will explore major developments in film history, theory and criticism. Students will become familiar with several different film movements in the development of the art form and will be introduced to basic ideas in film theory. Through a variety of film movements and historical periods, students will develop an understanding of the cultural, industrial, and political contexts for some of the most significant debates about film. Specific topics covered will include Russian formalism, the history of classic Hollywood cinema, the French new wave, recent global cinemas, as well as alternatives to Hollywood in the United States. Class time will be divided between the discussion of the historical movements and critical texts and the application of those texts to a primary cinematic text. Students will be evaluated on the basis of weekly postings, participation in discussion, essay exams and formal writing opportunities.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1101 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


FILM 3200 - Screenwriting
Credits: 3.00
A study of the genres, structures and mechanics of screenwriting as well as the experience of writing, reading and revising a screenplay.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102


FILM 4081 - Independent Study
Credits: 3.00
Guided investigation of a topic not addressed by regularly scheduled courses. Students must propose a detailed plan of readings, articulating precise learning objectives, and secure the written consent of both a supervising instructor and of the department chair.
Other: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: English/Philosophy
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1101 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C



Finance

Finance


FINC 3501 - Personal Financial Management
Credits: 3.00
A non-technical course of general application stressing personal financial planning, budgeting, savings and investments, small business ownership, estate planning, and retirement income.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: Richard College Upper Division RCUD


FINC 3511 - Corporate Finance
Credits: 3.00
Financial functions in the modern corporation with emphasis on its managerial aspects.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2101 and GPA 2.00 or above required 2.00 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


FINC 4521 - International Finance
Credits: 3.00
Designed to focus on the application of finance concepts in the international environment.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: FINC 3511 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


FINC 4531 - Intermediate Corporate Finance
Credits: 3.00
An in-depth study of financial planning and management with emphasis on capital structure and dividend payout policies, cost of capital and capital budgeting, and working capital management. The course serves as a framework for understanding a broad range of corporate financial decisions. Cases and directed readings are used extensively.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: FINC 3511 Minimum Grade: C and ( GPA 2.00 or above required 2.00 and College of Business Maj-Minor 1 ) and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


FINC 4532 - Problems in Corporate Finance
Credits: 3.00
An examination of various topics in finance including bankruptcy and reorganization, mergers and acquisitions, lease financing, and others. The course emphasizes logical financial decision making techniques through the examination of underlying theories and through problem solving. Problem cases, and directed readings are used extensively.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: FINC 3511 and ACCT 2102 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


FINC 4541 - Investment Analysis
Credits: 3.00
A study of the investment process with concentration on the formulation of a sound investment program for both individuals and institutions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: FINC 3511 Minimum Grade: C and GPA 2.00 or above required 2.00 and College of Business Maj-Minor 1 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


FINC 4542 - Portfolio Management
Credits: 3.00
The course is designed to focus on creating, managing, and evaluating investment portfolios to meet specific objectives and risks.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: FINC 3511 Minimum Grade: C and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


FINC 4561 - Bank Management
Credits: 3.00
Analysis of functions and operations of commercial, investment, and savings banks. Primary emphasis is on investment, financial structure and the bank's role in determining financial variables and resource allocation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: FINC 3511 and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


FINC 4571 - Derivative Markets
Credits: 3.00
An in-depth study of options and futures markets. Topics will include the institutional structure of options and futures markets, pricing models, and hedging techniques.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: FINC 3511 Minimum Grade: C and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


FINC 4585 - Special Topics in Finance
Credits: 3.00
Title and description of specific course to be specified at time of offering. Course (with different title and description) may be repeated with Department Chair's permission up to a maximum of 6 hours of credit.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: FINC 3511 Minimum Grade: C and Richard College Upper Division RCUD


FINC 4586 - Business Internship (Finance)
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Practical finance internship experience with a commercial firm or organization for selected upper division students.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance
Pre-requisites: Richard College Upper Division RCUD


FINC 5571 - Derivative Markets
Credits: 3.00
An in depth study of options and futures markets. Topics will include the institutional structure of options and futures markets, pricing models, and hedging techniques.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance


FINC 6521 - International Finance
Credits: 3.00
Topics include foreign exchange market; exchange rates; balance of payments analysis and adjustment process; financing institutions, monetary relations and monetary reform, gold, the dollar, devaluation, and SDRs. Cross-listed with ECON 6461.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance


FINC 6532 - Finance
Credits: 3.00
A study of the major financial tools and techniques through problem solving and case studies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance


FINC 6542 - Investment Analy/Portfl Mngmnt
Credits: 3.00
Study of securities markets and security analysis for portfolio planning.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance


FINC 6561 - Internat'l Mgmt Financial Inst
Credits: 3.00
Designed as a study of the financial management of financial institutions with an emphasis on international aspects.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance


FINC 6585 - Special Problems in Finance
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
In-depth supervised individual study of one or more current problems of the finance profession.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance


FINC 6586 - Internship
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Practical finance internship experience with a commercial firm or organization for selected students.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Business
Department: Accounting/Finance



Foreign Languages/Literature

Foreign Languages/Literature


FORL 1598 - Elementary Arabic I
Credits: 3.00
The purpose of this course is to provide highly motivated students with an opportunity to learn basic speaking skills in Arabic. Grammar and vocabulary study will take place outside the classroom. This self-study will serve as a basis for semi-weekly meetings with the course tutor, a native speaker of Arabic who will direct Arabic-only conversations with the student.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FORL 1599 - Elementary Arabic II
Credits: 3.00
The purpose of this course is to provide highly motivated students with an opportunity to learn basic speaking skills in Arabic. Grammar and vocabulary study will take place outside the classroom. This self-study will serve as a basis for semi-weekly meetings with the course tutor, a native speaker of Arabic who will direct Arabic-only conversations with the student.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FORL 1698 - Elementary Chinese I
Credits: 3.00
This is the first of a two-semester program in which the purpose is to provide highly motivated students with the opportunity to learn basic speaking skills in Chinese. The methods utilized conform to the self-instructional format developed by the National Association for Self-Instructional Programs.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FORL 1699 - Elementary Chinese II
Credits: 3.00
This is the second of a two-semester program the purpose of which is to provide highly motivated students with the opportunity to continue to develop the basic speaking skills in Chinese that they learned at the FORL 1698 level. The methods utilized conform to the self-instructional format developed by the National Association for Self-Instructional Programs.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FORL 1698


FORL 1798 - Elementary Japanese I
Credits: 3.00
This is the first of a two-semester program in which the purpose is to provide highly motivated students with the opportunity to learn basic speaking skills in Japanese. The methods utilized conform to the self-instructional format developed by the National Association for Self-Instructional Programs.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FORL 1799 - Elementary Japanese II
Credits: 3.00
This is the second of a two-semester program the purpose of which is to provide highly motivated students with the opportunity to continue to develop the basic speaking skills in Japanese that they learned at the FORL 1798 level. The methods utilized conform to the self-instructional format developed by the National Association for Self-Instructional Programs.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FORL 1798


FORL 1898 - Elementary Portuguese I
Credits: 3.00
This is the first of a two-semester program in which the purpose is to provide highly motivated students with the opportunity to learn basic speaking skills in Portuguese. The methods utilized conform to the self-instructional format developed by the National association for Self-Instructional Programs.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FORL 1899 - Elementary Portuguese II
Credits: 3.00
This is the second of a two-semester program the purpose of which is to provide highly motivated students with the opportunity to continue to develop the basic speaking skills in Portuguese that they learned at the FORL 1898 level. The methods utilized conform to the self-instructional format developed by the National Association for Self-Instructional Programs.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FORL 1898


FORL 1XXX - University Syst Studies Abroad
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00

Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FORL 2200 - Survey of National Literatures
Credits: 3.00
An introductory survey of a national literature other than English. The subject will vary and will be chosen from among the following: Classical Greece and Rome, China, France, Francophone countries, Germanic countries, Italy, Spain, Latin-American countries. All readings are in translation. No knowledge of the foreign language(s) in question is necessary. Course may be repeated with a different subject.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL Placmnt Exam-Credit 1102 X


FORL 2300 - Topics in National Literatures
Credits: 3.00
Readings from a variety of literary texts drawn from one or more national literatures other than English. The subject will vary, as for example, travel literature, myths/legends, science fiction, drama.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL Placmnt Exam-Credit 1102 X


FORL 3111 - World Film
Credits: 3.00
This course will offer film viewings and analysis of films selected from different national traditions, several of which will always be represented. Readings in Film History and Theory will be used to illuminate selected films from differing cultures and traditions (French, German, Spanish, Latin American, Japanese, etc.) All films have subtitles and all readings are in English. No knowledge of the foreign language (s) in question is necessary. Course may be repeated with a different subject.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


FORL 4185 - Topics in Lang and Literature
Credits: 3.00
Content of course varies. This course focuses on topics related to the study of culture, literature, film, and/or linguistics. Taught in English. Course may be repeated for credit with different topic. (Possible topics: Language, Society, and Culture; Arab Women in Literature and Film; Applied Linguistics in the Foreign Language Classroom; U.S. Latino Culture and Literature, etc.)
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


FORL 4300 - Seminar in Global Studies
Credits: 3.00
An interdisciplinary study of a selected culture, involving history, politics, sociology, and economics, as well as literature, art, music and spiritual life. The course includes a trip to the area studied.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FORL 4485 - Topics in Natl Film Traditions
Credits: 3.00
This course will offer film viewings and analysis within individual national traditions. Readings in Film History and Theory will be used to illuminate selected films from a national tradition (French, German, Spanish, Latin American, Japanese, etc). All films have subtitles and all readings are in English. No knowledge of the foreign language(s) in question is necessary. Course may be repeated with a different subject.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C


FORL 4501 - Found of Language Development
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed primarily for future and novice language teachers, introduces students to theories of first and second language development as observed in a minimum of 20 hours of field experience in a P-5 school. It is a requirement for all students completing the P-12 initial certification track in French and Spanish.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


FORL 4502 - Methods Teaching Foreign Lang
Credits: 3.00
A course designed for students to develop skills and strategies in teaching and planning foreign language instruction at the secondary level.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


FORL 4586 - Teaching Internship
Credits: 3.00 to 9.00
This course consists of teaching in a public school under the supervision of an experienced, qualified classroom teacher. Students whose programs require a 3 hour, 2 semester internship may repeat the course for a total of 6 hours. These students may take the first three hours after completing two FORL courses.
Lab: 14.00 to 40.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and Educ.Field Experience Appl FE


FORL 5300 - Seminar in Global Studies
Credits: 3.00
An interdisciplinary study of a selected culture, involving history, politics, sociology, and economics, as well as literature, art, music and spiritual life. The course includes a trip to the area studied.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FORL 6001 - Action Rsrch Frgn Lang Clssrm
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an advanced introduction to the principles of action research in the foreign language classroom. Students will learn techniques for action research and complete a research proposal.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE


FORL 6010 - Topics in Language Education
Credits: 3.00
This course will have variable content focusing on issues related to applied linguistics, foreign language acquisition, and/or pedagogical approaches. Possible topics include: Foreign Language Curriculum Planning, Discourse in the Language Classroom, Community-Based Learning and Language Education, and Culture in the Language Classroom. Course may be taken more than once with different topics.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE


FORL 6100 - Iss in Appl Ling&2nd Lang Acqu
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an advanced introduction to the principles of applied linguistics to teachers with limited background in linguistics who will be working with second and foreign language learners.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE


FORL 6501 - Foreign Lang & Curr Elem Schl
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed for students seeking degree in Foreign Language Education. It treats the disciplines of Foreign Language methodology and curriculum design applied to elementary school teaching and includes class observation, planning of instruction, and field experience.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FORL 6502 - Methods Teaching Foreign Lang
Credits: 3.00
A course designed for students to develop skills and strategies in teaching and planning foreign language instruction at the P-12 levels.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FORL 6699 - Master's Thesis
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
This course is available only to students enrolled in the MAT program who wish to write a Master's Thesis as the culminating experience of the program. Students will explore a topic related to the discipline they wish to teach. Candidates who choose this option will be required to defend the thesis.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures



French

French


FREN 1001 - Elementary French I
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French and to the culture of French-speaking regions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FREN 1001C - Elementary French I - Block
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French and to the culture of French-speaking regions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Co-requisites: FREN 1002C


FREN 1002 - Elementary French II
Credits: 3.00
Continued listening, speaking, reading and writing in French with further study of the culture of French-speaking regions. Pre-requisite: FREN 1001 with a grade of C or better or two years high school study.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FREN 1001 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 1001C Minimum Grade: C


FREN 1002C - Elementary French II - Block
Credits: 3.00
Continued listening, speaking, reading and writing in French with further study of the culture of French-speaking regions. Pre-requisite: FREN 1001 with a grade of C or better or two years high school study.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FREN 1001C Minimum Grade: C


FREN 1XXX - University Syst Studies Abroad
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00

Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FREN 2001 - Intermediate French I
Credits: 3.00
A continuation of FREN 1002, FREN 2001 provides a solid base of thematic vocabulary and grammar structures together with a varied sampling of literary readings, communicative activities, and cultural information.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FREN 1002 Minimum Grade: C or FRE 102 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 1002C Minimum Grade: C


FREN 2002 - Intermediate French II
Credits: 3.00
Emphasis on applying reading skills to texts in different disciplines, on the continued development of writing and speaking skills, and on the functional use of grammar.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FREN 2001 Minimum Grade: C or FRE 103 Minimum Grade: C


FREN 3100 - Composition and Conversation
Credits: 3.00
Extensive practice in written and spoken French. Includes grammar review, vocabulary expansion, and composition and conversation practice on contemporary cultural/literary topics. Can be taken three times for credit with different content.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FREN 2002 Minimum Grade: C or FRE 104 Minimum Grade: C


FREN 3210 - Topics in French Literature
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the analysis of French literature through the study of selected text and authors of major French literary movements. The focus of the course may vary from the thematic approach to a study of literary genres.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FREN 2002 Minimum Grade: C


FREN 3211 - Topics in French Culture
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to contemporary French and Francophone culture through the study of films, popular music, media, newspapers art, and/or television shows. May be taken up to four times for credit with different content.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FREN 2002 Minimum Grade: C or FRE 104 Minimum Grade: C


FREN 3212 - Topics in Francophone Cinema
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to Francophone cinema through the discussion and analysis of French-language films placed within their cultural and historical context. Can be taken twice for credit with different content.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FREN 3220 - Survey of French Literature I
Credits: 3.00
A study of selected works by major writers of the Middle Ages, sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FREN 2002 Minimum Grade: C


FREN 3221 - Survey of French Literature II
Credits: 3.00
A study of selected works by major French writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FREN 2002 Minimum Grade: C


FREN 3450 - Business French
Credits: 3.00
An intensive and extensive study of the principles governing the structure of the French language. As a culmination of series of courses introducing students to oral and written communication, this course teaches students the finer points of grammar and allows them to refine their language skills.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FREN 2002 Minimum Grade: C or FRE 104 Minimum Grade: C


FREN 4000 - Advanced French Translation
Credits: 3.00
This course will provide students the opportunity to gain skills translating French to English as well as English to French.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FREN 4150 - Advanced Language Skills
Credits: 3.00
Intensive study of the principles governing the structures of the French language. In this course students will refine and extend their language skills.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FREN 3100


FREN 4210 - French Literature and Film
Credits: 3.00
A comparative approach to the study of French literature and its cinematic adaptation and/or a thematic approach to selected literary texts and films.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FREN 3100 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3210 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3211 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3220 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3221 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3450 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3101 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3102 Minimum Grade: C


FREN 4220 - Contemporary French Literature
Credits: 3.00
A study of selected works by major French writers of the twentieth century.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FREN 3100 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3101 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3202 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3210 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3211 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3220 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3221 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3450 Minimum Grade: C


FREN 4230 - Classical French Drama
Credits: 3.00
A study of the major dramatists of the seventeenth century.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FREN 3100 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3101 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3102 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3210 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3211 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3220 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3221 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3450 Minimum Grade: C


FREN 4240 - French Poetry
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the study of poetry and poetics followed by an in-depth analysis of selected poems from one of the major French literary movements (Romanticism, Symbolism, Surrealism, etc.).
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FREN 3100 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3101 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3102 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3210 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3211 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3220 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3221 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3450 Minimum Grade: C


FREN 4310 - Francophone Civilization
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the cultural diversity of the French speaking world through the study of authentic materials from Europe, Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and Canada.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FREN 4320 - French Civiliztn and Culture
Credits: 3.00
A study of the evolution of French couture and civilization from past to present through an exploration of France's major historical, artistic, and social development.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FREN 4484 - Senior Capstone
Credits: 1.00
Students will prepare a portfolio in which they will assess their linguistic and cultural knowledge acquired in courses already taken and courses taken during the Capstone semester. At least 51% of this course will be on-line. Portfolios will be prepared electronically and consist of a web page. This format will ensure that the student has the ability to use current technology and be able to utilize a wide range of resources used in the modern workplace, the language classroom, and graduate school. Students will be required to pass an oral proficiency interview.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FREN 4785 - Special Topics in French
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Readings, reports, and/or directed study abroad.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: FREN 3100 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3210 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3211 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3212 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3220 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3221 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 3450 Minimum Grade: C


FREN 5501 - Foreign Lng Tchng Elem Schools
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed for students seeking a degree in Foreign Language Education. The objective is to prepare qualified foreign language teachers for elementary school. This course treats the principles of foreign language methodology applied to elementary school teaching, and includes class observations, planning of instruction, and field experience.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FREN 6150 - Linguistics & Literary Theory
Credits: 3.00
This course is a study of the intersection(s) between theoretical linguistics and literary theory. Students will look at the ways in which language as a broadly defined linguistic category interrelates with literary texts in particular and cultural documents in general through the lens of some of the most influential French and French-speaking linguists and theorists of the twentieth century.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FREN 6210 - French Literature and Film
Credits: 3.00
A comparative approach to the study of French literature and its cinematic adaptation and/or a thematic approach to selected literary texts and films.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FREN 6220 - Contemporary French Literature
Credits: 3.00
A study of selected works by major French writers of the twentieth century.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FREN 6230 - French Drama
Credits: 3.00
A study of major trends in French dramatic art, with critical study and discussion of representative plays from a variety of centuries and literary movements.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FREN 6240 - Seminar in French Poetry
Credits: 3.00
This course introduces the student to the French textual analysis method, 'explication de texte'. Students will learn the art of versification as well as the technical terms used in literary analysis as they do in-depth analysis of works selected from major literary movements.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FREN 6250 - Translation
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the theory and practice of translation. Intensive practice in the translation of texts in French and representative of various academic disciplines.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FREN 6310 - Francophone Civilization
Credits: 3.00
The focus of study will be on literary works (poetry, novels, short stories) written mostly by Francophone writers from diverse horizons. This course will introduce students to the cultural diversity of Francophone culture and literature and explore the various repercussions of French language on local cultures and ways of life.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FREN 6320 - French Civilization & Culture
Credits: 3.00
A study of the evolution of French culture and civilization from past to present through an exploration of France's major, historical, artistic, and social development.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


FREN 6785 - Special Topics in French
Credits: 3.00
Approved readings, reports, and/or directed Study Abroad.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures



FinTech Academy

FinTech Academy


FTA 2400 - Intro to Financial Technology
CEUs: 3.00
This course introduces the fundamentals of Financial Technology. It explores what new financial technologies are emerging and how the technological advances in data analytics are enabling the innovation in the financial industry. It also examines new services and business models in various area of banking, insurance and financial asset management.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor


FTA 2410 - Coding for FinTech
CEUs: 3.00
This course covers the design and development of dynamic, data-driven financial applications using client and server-side architecture. It focuses on various application development techniques for user and mobile friendly design. It also introduces how to develop financial applications conforming to the industry standards.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor


FTA 3055 - Innovative Solutns for FinTech
CEUs: 3.00
This course examines cases of new and emerging services and business models in the financial industry. It also focuses on how to identify business opportunities in FinTech and analyze business feasibility and sustainability. Students examine business models in FinTech.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor


FTA 3360 - Adv Fin Mgmt w/ Digital Trnsfr
CEUs: 3.00
An integrative examination of the theory, practice, and applications of managerial finance including investment and financing decisions as affected by timing, risk, financial markets, and digital transformation
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor


FTA 4001 - Foundations of Fintech
CEUs: 3.00
The financial services industries are changing rapidly with the emergence of financial technology (FinTech). The objective of the course is to provide students with an overview of FinTech and introductions to its applications in financial services, such as commercial and investment banking, digital investing, financial advising, and insurance. Students are expected to develop a broad understanding of the recent FinTech development and its impact on different parts of the financial world. Students will also have hands-on problem-solving experiences that can be useful in FinTech applications and innovation. Topics may include but are not limited to: blockchain and cryptocurrencies, smart contracting, payments, digital banking, P2P lending, crowdfunding, robo-advising, and InsurTech.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eCampus


FTA 4002 - Financial Technologies
CEUs: 3.00
This course examines the information and communications tools, technologies, and standards integral to consumer, merchant, and enterprise services in the payments and financial service sectors. Explores technology’s role in reshaping FinTech businesses. Technologies span messaging, communication networks and gateways, core processing, mobile and online software, and application program interfaces (APIs). Includes the challenges, standards, and techniques associated with securing systems and data.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eCampus


FTA 4003 - Commercial Banking in FinTech
CEUs: 3.00
The FinTech revolution is creating significant disruption to the traditional processes of managing and regulating financial institutions, especially banks. Digital technology is increasingly altering basic financial intermediation functions such as payment processing, risk management, information dissemination, price discovery, capital raising, and consumer expectations concerning access to funds and the timing of loan decisions. Understanding, assessing and forecasting FinTech’s impact on banking is particularly important because proper management and oversight of financial institutions is essential to the efficient operation of the national, as well as global, economy. In this course, students will learn about the principles and practices of commercial bank management, bank regulation, and the tradeoffs between risk and return. Challenges presented by the FinTech evolution, including traditional and emergent competitors as well as demographic, social, and technology forces driving change in the industry, will be integrated throughout the entire course.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eCampus


FTA 4005 - Intro Financial Data Anlytics
CEUs: 3.00
This course provides the foundation for financial data analytics used in business and FinTech applications. The objective of this course is for students to gain experience in analyzing financial data using modern machine learning techniques, statistical methods, and prediction models. Students will develop computational skills to perform data analysis using a modern statistical programming environment, and apply these skills to address a range of problems encountered by business firms, including those in the FinTech industry. The topics discussed include an introduction to R language, visualization of financial data, cluster analysis, simple and multiple linear regression, classification models, high dimension data analysis using Lasso, and model assessment and selection using cross validation. Students will have hands-on experience in the development of data analytics applications to analyze real world financial problems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eCampus


FTA 4100 - Intro to Info Security FinTech
CEUs: 3.00
The purpose of this course is to introduce the business student to the rapidly evolving and critical international arenas of privacy, information security, and critical infrastructure. This course is designed to develop knowledge and skills for security of information and information systems within organizations. It focuses on concepts and methods associated with security across several systems platforms, including internal and Internet-facing systems. The course utilizes a world view to examine critical infrastructure concepts as well as techniques for assessing risk associated with accidental and intentional breaches of security in a global network. It introduces the associated issues of ethical uses of information and of privacy considerations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eCampus


FTA 4800 - Financl Analytcs&Data Analytcs
CEUs: 3.00
This course presents an overview of information systems in a modern organization and their strategic importance in supporting financial business processes. The rationale for business computing will be discussed, along with the underlying financial concepts needed to understand and guide system implementation. Additional business processes such as the procurement process, sales order process, and production process will be presented and modeled using SAP® software. Students will engage in collaborative experiential learning by managing a Muesli cereal manufacturing company based in Germany; complexity is scaled in three scenarios – Introduction (sales, production, procurement, and planning), Extended (product design, finance, and investment strategies), and Advanced (transportation logistics). Students will develop analytical tools and use real-time information to analyze BI and forecast financial outcomes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor


FTA 4810 - FinTech in Asia
CEUs: 3.00
Companies using innovative technologies digitally transform business models, operations, and customer experiences. FinTech companies monetize data using analytics and technological innovation to improve the customer experience building trust, loyalty, and consequently, revenue streams. These transformative customer experiences proffered by FinTech companies also create social good by advancing financial inclusion in society. Minorities and other underrepresented populations accrue proportionally larger marginal benefits from FinTech companies offering low-cost access to high-quality services and products. This course presents an overview of the drivers of FinTech in Asia. Domestic course work will be enriched with an Asian study abroad experience that includes discussion with local business leaders via a conference-like environment that includes variations of Asian culture/business depending on geographic location, e.g. Hong Kong vs. Singapore.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor



Geography

Geography


GEOG 1013 - World Geography
Credits: 3.00
An introduction survey of world geography with attention given to demographic, political, cultural, economic, and environmental characteristics of regions of the world. Especially recommended for education majors.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 1111 - Physical Geography
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to physical geography, surveying weather, climate, vegetation, soils, landforms, water resources, and their spatial interrelations and distributions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 1112 - Weather and Climate
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to weather and climate including influences on the biosphere (ecosystems and biomes). This course looks at local, regional, and global geographic relationships among atmospheric and biospheric systems, including an introduction to climate change.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 1112L - Weather and Climate Laboratory
Credits: 1.00
An introduction to weather and climate including influences on the biosphere (ecosystems and biomes). This course looks at local, regional, and global geographic relationships among atmospheric and biospheric, including an introduction to climate change. Students will engage in hands-on, field-based environmental observations in the laboratory.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 1113 - Landform Geography
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to Earth-surface processes and landforms. Students will observe and interpret a variety of landscapes in terms of the fundamental processes and factors that have shaped them through time, including water, wind, and tectonic forces.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 1113L - Landform Geography Laboratory
Credits: 1.00
An introduction to Earth-surface processes and landforms. Students will observe and interpret a variety of landscapes in terms of the fundamental processes and factors that have shaped them through time, including water, wind, and tectonic forces. Students will engage in hands-on, field- based observations in the laboratory. Students will gain experience in the interpretation and integration of geospatial information including topographic and geologic maps, as well as aerial photographs and satellite imagery.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 2010 - Political Geography
Credits: 3.00
A foundations course which looks at the basis of political territory, international law and boundaries-both on the land and on the sea. This course identifies basic geopolitical units and their geographical expression--including states, nation states and supranational territories--and identifies the rules that govern sovereignty, territorial definition and international interactions at the borders. Special attention is given to the concept of nationalism and its role in redefining the contemporary global map.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 2083 - Intro to Geographical Analysis
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the practice of geographic research. The course takes a comprehensive approach to the research process in geography, including the development and formulation of research questions, the role of academic literature, identifying and working with relevant data sources, the application of qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis, and written and oral presentation of research findings.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 2202 - Environmental Science
Credits: 3.00
This course will focus on the key principles of environmental science, paying special attention to environmental systems and human interactions with these systems. The aim of the course is to give the student a solid, scientifically based understanding of the earth's current environment and how to analyze, assess, and begin to address human populations' impact on this environment.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 2202L - Environmental Science Lab
Credits: 1.00
This lab course will bring key principles of environmental science to a lab setting. The aim of the lab exercises is to give the student a hands-on experience involving basic observation, evaluation, and assessment of environmental themes and problems.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 2.00 Other: .00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 2253 - Geographies of Econ Developmnt
Credits: 3.00
This course explores the process of economic development under conditions of globalization. The focus is upon development theory, development and underdevelopment, debt and indebtedness, the construction of 'The Third World', and the creation of economic dependency. Special attention is paid to 'developing' areas or the world, including Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, South Asia, and others, where regionalized and national economic development theories, developed in the post World War II era which have subsequently challenged the so-called Washington Consensus and American development discourses.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 2503 - Cultural Geography
Credits: 3.00
A study of the earth as the home of the human race. The earth is here divided into particular world regions, which are studied in turn. Emphasis is given to the concept of culture and how it interacts in particular geographic regions with history, economics, politics, and demography.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 2505 - Human Impacts on the Envrnmnt
Credits: 3.00
This course examines the extent to which human activities have altered the natural environment--how much they have influenced animal species; vegetation systems; soils; water bodies and their quality; regional geomorphology; and the atmosphere. Policies, programs, and global extent of human environmental impact included.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 2553 - Intro to GIS and Mapping Scien
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to GIS, mapping and geospatial sciences. Topics include introductory GIS, map projections, land partitioning systems, map reading, map analysis, GPS, map making, aerial photography, and remote sensing. This course will guide students to GIS, mapping sciences and emerging geospatial technologies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 3010 - Rethinking Geopolitics
Credits: 3.00
This course analyzes the field of contemporary geopolitical theory and the new 'critical geopolitics'. Beginning with an exploration of geopolitics in the 19th century, the course identifies the way in which strategic worldviews have influenced geographical thinking at all levels. Contemporary critical geopolitics--classic political, territorial and strategic thought of late 20th century-- is discussed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 3020 - Political Geography
Credits: 3.00
Political geography is concerned with the spatial dynamics of power relations. This course focuses particularly on the nation-state, exploring the logic of the state and how it manages to legitimize itself as the dominant arbiter of political power. The course will also look at interactions between states and how they compete to control and dominate territory and resources.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 3085 - Select Topics Regional Geog
Credits: 3.00
Analysis of resource endowments, patterns of occupancy, and aspects of economic and political organization in different regions. The course may be repeated for additional credit with differing content. Title and hours of credit will be supplied at the time of offering.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 3253 - Economic Geography
Credits: 3.00
A study of the economy and its geographical structures and patterns. Introduces and critiques theories of location and economic landscapes and processes and develops a conceptual framework of the economy that encompasses the constitutive roles of spatial relations and nature-society relationships. and structural relationships among economic activities. Same as ECON 3425.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 3300 - Population Geography
Credits: 3.00
This course in population geography introduces the basic methods of demography as well as the impacts population dynamics have on society and its economy through time and space.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 3405 - Geographies of Sustainability
Credits: 3.00
A study of the inherent geographical challenges and possible solutions to a global economic system that is quickly depleting scarce resources while causing rapid environmental strain.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 3563 - Remote Sensing & GIS Integ
Credits: 4.00
This course introduces the principles of remote sensing and explores the practical integration of remote sensing with geographic information systems.
Lecture: 4.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 3643 - Urban Geography
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to urban processes and patterns, including: global urbanization and the origin of cities; urban hierarchies and systems of cities; global cities; uneven economic growth and the functional specialization of cities; economic restructuring, migration, regional policies, dynamics of urban property markets; changes in population job location, housing, mobility and neighborhoods; ethno-cultural diversity, and spatial inequalities; and planning, politics and policy issues in North American cities.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 3644 - Atlanta's Geographies
Credits: 3.00
This course examines the geographic dimensions of the city of Atlanta and its metropolitan region. Students will gain an understanding of the historical, urban, social, economic, political and physical patterns and processes shaping the city and metro area at different geographic scales: at the local and metro scales, the city's growth and internal structure; at the regional scale, the city's role in the American South; and at the national and global scales, the city's dynamic position in wider urban, economic and social systems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 3713 - Meteorology
Credits: 3.00
A study of weather and climate, including atmospheric properties and processes, and atmospheric influences on Earth's surface environment, at a variety of spatial and time-scales.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 1112 and GEOG 1112L


GEOG 3723 - Physiography of United States
Credits: 3.00
A study of the physiographic regions of the United States, including the genesis and distributional patterns of major regional landforms, soils, and vegetation. Emphasis is placed on the cartographic interpretation of regional features.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 3800 - Biogeography
Credits: 3.00
Biogeography is the subdiscipline of Geography that deals with the distribution, ranges, and limits of plants and animals over space and time. This class will focus on the processes and patterns of plant distribution in the contemporary landscape, stressing the development of North American vegetation. The course will cover topics evolution as it relates to Quaternary migration and distribution, North American biomes, disturbance ecology, invasive species, environmental stewardship, climate change, and field methods.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 3900 - Ecological Climatology
Credits: 3.00
Ecology and Climatology are two vastly different disciplines. Ecology is concerned with the interactions of organisms with their environments and Climatology is the study of the long-term physical state of the atmosphere. There two disciplines were not combined until the advent of global climate models in the 1970s. Ecological climatology is the interdisciplinary framework used to understand the functioning of the terrestrial ecosystems as part of the climate system. Specifically, how do changes in land cover influence short-term and long-term weather patterns.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: ( GEOG 1112 and GEOG 1112L and GEOG 1113 and GEOG 1113L )


GEOG 4013 - Globalization
Credits: 3.00
This course offers a survey and analysis of the multiple dimensions (economic, political, cultural, environmental, urban, ideological) of globalization and its role in shaping contemporary world geographies. The course will situate globalization in the context of capitalism's historical and geographical development and will focus on the changes and processes that have shaped world geographies since the late 1960s. Students will acquire both empirical and theoretical understandings by studying competing concepts and explanations of globalization and its impacts and applying them to current day events and issues.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 1013


GEOG 4083 - Faculty-Mentored Research
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Research or other work related to student’s independent project. This is a 1-3 hour course repeatable up to six hours.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 2083


GEOG 4084 - Geography Capstone
Credits: 3.00
A capstone course for Geography majors focusing on the final stages of the research process, including how to discuss the relevance of research findings in both academic and broader contexts, how to effectively communicate research findings, and how to professionally present and communicate expertise and skills developed through independent research and other coursework.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 4083


GEOG 4086 - Internship
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Students will secure a position with an entity outside of UWG (corporation, foundation, government, etc.) to obtain field experience. Repeatable for up to nine credit hours.

College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 4103 - Soil Science
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to soils from a natural science perspective, emphasizing the relationship between soils and geology, climate, vegetation, and landscapes. Concepts will include soil physical and chemical properties, soil formation and horizonation, soil water, erosion, soil geography, and environmental and sustainability issues related to soil. Practical field and laboratory skills will be emphasized, including standard techniques and terminology for describing soils in the field, applying the US system of soil classification, interpreting National Resources Conservation Service soil survey data and performing geospatial analysis of digital soils data. A required field trip will allow students to observe soils in a variety of landscape settings.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 1113 or GEOL 1121


GEOG 4253 - Seminar in Econ Geography
Credits: 3.00
Study of advanced topics in economic geography. Specific titles will be announced for semester offered and will be entered on transcripts. May be repeated for additional credit as topics change.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 3253


GEOG 4400 - Energy and Sustainability
Credits: 3.00
This course will focus on the links between energy use and environmental degradation. Physical processes and social dynamics will be considered in order to understand the complex issues of energy production, demand, and consumption. In this class students will practice expressing informed opinions about current environmental energy debates, examine the social aspects of energy issues, and consider alternative energy futures.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 4403 - Water Resources Planning
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the evolution and current practice of water resources management in the United States. Emphasis on principles of multiple objective resource evaluation and project design.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 4500 - Moral Geographies
Credits: 3.00
A study of the intersection between ethics and geography. This course takes up issues such as the geographical conditioning of norms and values, the geographical dimensions of responsibility, and the ethical dilemmas involved in our current social geography. As will be revealed in the course, many of the issues covered in human geography, from globalization and border making to migration and environmental degradation, are linked to deeply seated, yet contested norms.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 4503 - Culture, Space and Place
Credits: 3.00
This seminar explores cultural geography from a critical perspective. Students are asked to consider the relationship between culture and development, post-colonial cultural theory, gender and race, feminist theory, cultural hybridity and globalization, and the new cultural spaces of the 21st century. The focus in upon identifying the geographical dimensions of conflicts, underlying the construction of culture, understanding culture as a discursive project, and appreciating culture as a power relationship.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 2503


GEOG 4553 - Geographic Information System
Credits: 4.00
An introduction to the use of Geographic Information Systems, including GIS theory, data input, spatial analysis, and final output.
Lecture: 4.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 2553


GEOG 4554 - Computer Cartography
Credits: 4.00
Computer-assisted map design and production.
Lecture: 4.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 2553


GEOG 4562 - Airphoto Interpret/Photogramty
Credits: 4.00
Study on airphoto interpretation and photogrammetry. Topics include digital airphotos, correcting airphoto distortions, orthophoto generation, stereoscopy and DEM generation, airphoto interpretation techniques, and mapping with airphotos.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 4564 - Contemp Remote Sensing App
Credits: 4.00
This course applies remote sensing techniques to contemporary topics like image classification, LiDAR, natural resources, urbanization, water, or climate. Students will learn how to process remote sensing data and will develop remote sensing application projects.
Lecture: 4.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 2553


GEOG 4600 - Applied Climatology
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of climatology with an emphasis on how the climate system works, quantitative approaches to climate analysis, the planetary energy budget, and air-sea interactions. Urban, regional and global climate features and human impacts are addressed. Current issues in climate research, sustainability, and policy will also be explored.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 1112


GEOG 4643 - Seminar in Urban Geography
Credits: 3.00
Study of advanced topics in urban geography. Specific titles will be announced for semester offered and will be entered on transcripts. May be repeated for additional credit as topics change.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 3643 or GEOG 3644 or SOCI 4333


GEOG 4700 - Global Environmental Change
Credits: 3.00
This is an advanced course on the evidence for, and theories of, environmental variability over time. Students will become familiar with environmental change before and since the Industrial Revolution. Attention will be paid to natural environmental mechanisms and the human activities of industrial societies which modify them. This is an advanced course on the evidence for, and theories of, environmental variability over time. Students will become familiar with environmental change before and since the Industrial Revolution. Attention will be paid to natural environmental mechanisms and the human activities of industrial societies which modify them.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: ( GEOG 1112 and GEOG 1113 ) or GEOL 1121


GEOG 4753 - Contemporary GIS Applications
Credits: 4.00
This course focuses on principles, methods, and applications of GIS technologies. It emphasizes hands-on opportunities to learn technical skills and best practices. Students will learn how to process different types of GIS data and will develop an individual project to design, implement and run GIS models.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 2553


GEOG 4755 - GIS Database Design
Credits: 4.00
This is an advanced course in GIS databases and enterprise GIS database implementation. It is focused on the creation and administration of GIS databases. It introduces the concepts of database structure and the integration of spatial and attribute data. Topics include metadata creation, database development, querying, and administration. This class includes lectures, lab assignments, exams, and student-directed projects.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 4553


GEOG 4757 - Program & Custom in GIS
Credits: 4.00
This is an advanced course in GIS focusing on application development and customization. Programming languages are used to develop GIS applications. In this course students will gain a solid understanding of the fundamentals of customization and programming in a GIS environment. Programming languages supporting GIS applications such as VBA and Python will be introduced. This class includes lectures, lab assignments, exams, and student-directed projects.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 4553


GEOG 4800 - Adv Topics in Biogeography
Credits: 3.00
An integrative course that examines concepts and knowledge from physical geography, geology, ecology, anthropology and evolutionary biology. This course will cover advanced topics on the origin and dispersal of plants and animals, biotic communities, ecological relationships and the impact of human activity on the biosphere.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 3800


GEOG 4893 - Practicum in GIS
Credits: 4.00
This is an applied practicum that fosters effective use of GIS. Students who successfully complete the course are able to create, manipulate, and manage geographic data to perform analysis tasks, to visualize geographic data, and to use geographic data analyses to support decision making. This course is designed to equip students with skills needed in the geospatial field.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 4553 and GEOG 3563 and GEOG 4554


GEOG 4900 - Dendrochronology
Credits: 4.00
Dendrochronology is one of the most versatile disciplines in the physical and cultural sciences. The science uses tree rings that are dated to their exact year of formation to analyze the temporal and spatial patterns of processes in the physical and cultural sciences. The science takes advantage of the fact that trees are nature's ultimate environmental monitoring stations. They are immobile, they assimilate events in the environment, they have their own special language, and they can't lie (although sometimes they make searching for the truth quite challenging). In this course, you'll learn how to read the language of trees and how to use this information to learn about past and present environmental processes that may shed light on your particular research questions.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 1112 and GEOG 1113


GEOG 4985 - Special Topics in Geography
Credits: 3.00
A course focusing on specialized, timely, or advanced topics in geography.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 5049 - The Economic Geog of Resources
Credits: 3.00
This course combines human and physical approaches to geographical analysis, and considers the economic geography of resource activities with special emphasis upon oil and mineral extraction, forestry, fishing and agriculture.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 5053 - EIS & Environmental Planning
Credits: 3.00
A survey of practical and legal aspects of rural environmental impact statements. Also an analysis of decision-making methods as applied to environmental planning.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 5086 - Internship
Credits: 3.00

Lab: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 5103 - Geography of Soils and Water
Credits: 3.00
A survey of water and soil resources including process formation and the distributional characteristics of water features and soil types.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 5551 - Intro to GIS & Mapping Science
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to GIS, mapping and geospatial sciences. Topics include introductory GIS, map projections, land partitioning systems, map reading, map analysis, GPS, map making, aerial photography, and remote sensing. This course will guide students to GIS, mapping sciences and emerging geospatial technologies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 5553 - Geographic Information Systems
Credits: 4.00
An introduction to the use of Geographic Information Systems, including GIS theory, data input, spatial analysis, and final output. Project required.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 5554 - Computer Cartography
Credits: 4.00
Instruction and practice in the technique of computer-assisted map design and production. Students will design various digital maps with GIS datasets and images. Project required.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 5562 - Airphoto Intrepret/Photogramty
Credits: 4.00
Study on air photo interpretation and photogrammetry. Topics include digital airphotos, correcting airphoto distortions, othophoto generation, stereoscopy and DEM generation, airphoto interpretation techniques, and mapping with airphotos. Project required.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 5563 - Remote Sensing
Credits: 4.00
Remote sensing of land, ocean, and atmosphere, including the response of earth materials to electromagnetic radiation; sensors and systems for earth observations; interpretation of imagery; mapping for environmental assessment, resource exploration, oceanographic, and other applications.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 5643 - Urban Geography
Credits: 3.00
Topics and concepts which characterize geographical analysis of urban areas, including types, structures, and functions of American cities plus local field research of land use and urban renewal.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 5700 - Global Environmental Change
Credits: 3.00
An advanced course on the evidence for, and theories of, environmental variability over time.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 6082 - Directed Problems
Credits: 3.00
Directed research with GIS and/or geospatial technologies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 5553


GEOG 6446 - Special Topics
Credits: 4.00
This course covers special topics to meet contemporary needs of GIS technologies and applications. A range of topics including, but not limited to, environmental GIS, planning GIS, enterprise GIS, LiDAR, Web-GIS, Voluntary GIS, neocartography, or military GIS applications may be taught through this course.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 5553


GEOG 6677 - Image Processing
Credits: 4.00
Instruction and practice in the technique of digital image handling and analysis. Students will use airborne and satellite imagery to detect various features and changes. Project required. Instruction and practice in the technique of digital image handling and analysis. Students will use airborne and satellite imagery to detect various features and changes. Project required.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 5563


GEOG 6753 - Adv GIS and Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.00
An advanced course in GIS and geospatial data analysis. Topics include enterprise GIS applications, spatially-enabled RDBMS, advanced issues in GIS, organizational issues, GIS modeling, geostatistics, and contemporary geospatial techniques. Project required.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 6755 - GIS Database Design
Credits: 4.00
This is an advanced course in GIS databases and enterprise GIS database implementation. It is focused on the creation and administration of GIS databases. It introduces the concepts of database structure and the integration of spatial and attribute data. Topics include metadata creation, database development, querying, and administration.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 5553


GEOG 6757 - Program & Custom in GIS
Credits: 4.00
This is an advanced course in GIS focusing on application development and customization. Programming languages are used to develop GIS applications. In this course students will gain a solid understanding of the fundamentals of customization and programming in a GIS environment.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOG 5553


GEOG 6893 - Practicum in GIS
Credits: 4.00
This is an applied practicum that fosters effective use of GIS. Students who successfully complete the course are able to create, manipulate, and manage geographic data to perform analysis tasks, to visualize geographic data, and to use geographic data analyses to support decision making. This course is designed to equip students with skills needed in the geospatial field. At least 16 credit hours from the program of study is required for registration.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 6895 - Project
Credits: 2.00
This course is for creative projects, including research and design, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses. Students can take up to six (6) credits. At least four (4) credits required for the non-thesis students. At least 23 credit hours from the program of study is required for registration.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 6993 - Thesis
Credits: 2.00
This course is for thesis writing under the direction of the faculty advisor. Students can take up to six (6) credits. At least four (4) credits required for the thesis option students. At least 23 credit hours from the program of study is required for registration.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 7053 - Cultural Geog for Teachers
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the themes, approaches, and techniques of human geography in the context of topics of current concern.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 7203 - Physical Geog for Teachers
Credits: 3.00
Investigation and discussion of selected geographic concepts related to man's physical environment as they apply to his utilization of earth space.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 7253 - Meteorology For Teachers
Credits: 3.00
A descriptive approach to the fundamentals of weather processes and elements designed especially for science and non-science teachers. Topics include temperatures, precipitation, pressure, air masses, fronts, clouds, atmospheric optics, and severe weather phenomena.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 7685 - Remote Sensing for Tchrs.
Credits: 4.00
Course is an introduction to remote sensing of land, ocean, and atmosphere, including the response of earth materials to electromagnetic radiation; sensors and systems for earth observations; interpretation of imagery; mapping for environmental assessment, resource exploration, oceanographic, and other applications. Teachers will complete a web-based project to access remote sensing imagery and develop age-appropriate learning activities for their classrooms.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 7686 - Image Processing for Tchrs.
Credits: 4.00
Course is an introduction to digital imaging processing techniques, including image enhancement, classification, georeferencing, mosaicking, and change detection. Teachers will use local imagery to develop age-appropriate learning activities for their classrooms.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOG 7687 - GIS for Teachers
Credits: 4.00
Course explores the applications of GIS within all areas of social studies, including history, sociology, economics, anthropology, and political science, as well as applications in the fields of biology, earth and environmental sciences.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences



Geology

Geology


GEOL 1121 - Intro Geosciences I:Phys Geol
Credits: 3.00
Acquaints students with geological concepts, processes, and earth materials and their effects on mankind and the environment. Topics include rocks and minerals,volcanoes, earthquakes, rivers, glaciers and the dynamic forces that move continents, build mountains, and create ocean basins.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 1121K - Introductory Geosciences I
CEUs: 4.00
This course covers Earth materials and processes.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 1.00
College: eCampus


GEOL 1121L - Physical Geology Lab
Credits: 1.00
Laboratory exercises to supplement lectures of GEOL 1121.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 1122 - Intro Geosciences II:Hist Geol
Credits: 3.00
Application of modern geological and biological concepts to interpret earth history. Acquaints students with fossil evidence for tracing the origin and evolution of life. Emphasis placed on developing a broad understanding of the origin and development of the earth and solar system, concepts of sea-floor spreading and plate tectonics and the evolution of the earth's atmosphere and life.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 1122L - Historical Geology Lab
Credits: 1.00
Laboratory exercises to supplement lectures of GEOL 1122.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 1123 - Environmental Observations
Credits: 3.00
Trains students in the protocols required for certification to participate in the Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment GLOBE Program.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 1123L - Environ. Obsrvtions Lab
Credits: 1.00
Laboratory exercises to supplement lectures of GEOL 1123.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 2002 - Applied Computing for Geoscncs
Credits: 2.00
An introduction to computer hardware, software and techniques used for acquiring, storing, analyzing, and presenting scientific data, particularly geologic and hydrologic data. Emphasis will be placed on commonly used and widely available software such as word processing, spreadsheet and database programs as well as mapping and drafting programs commonly used in the sciences.
Lecture: 1.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 2313 - Descriptive Astronomy
Credits: 3.00
A survey of sky awareness, historical development of astronomy, the solar system, stars, nebulae, galaxies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 2313L - Descriptive Astronomy Lab
Credits: 1.00
An experimental introduction to the elementary tools of astronomy.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 2503 - Introduction to Oceanography
Credits: 3.00
Introduces science and non-science majors to the biological, chemical, physical, and geological features of the oceans. Acquaints students with the topography and geologic history of the oceans, sea-floor spreading, plate tectonics, atmosphere/ocean interaction, current movements, and ocean biology and chemistry. The course also will discuss sources of food, energy, and mineral resources, as well as environmental issues affecting the sea. Satisfies Area D1 Core Requirements for non-science majors.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 2553 - Geology of the National Parks
Credits: 3.00
The study of the geologic processes that formed our national parks. Selected national parks and monuments are used to illustrate fundamental geologic processes such as volcanism, sedimentation, glaciation, stream and shoreline erosion, and crustal deformation among others.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 3003 - Field Methods
Credits: 3.00
A practical course that familiarizes students with basic instruments and techniques used by Geologists to collect structural, stratigraphic, topographic and other data in the field.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 3004 - Field Geol. & Geologic Mapping
Credits: 4.00
A practical course that familiarizes students with basic instruments and techniques used by Geologists to collect structural, stratigraphic, topographic and other data in the field.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOL 1121 Minimum Grade: C and GEOL 1121L and GEOL 1122 and GEOL 1122L and MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C


GEOL 3014 - Mineralogy and Crystallography
Credits: 4.00
The origin and physical properties of the more common minerals and their crystal forms. Megascopic recognition of specimens, their mineral associations, and a brief introduction to modern x-ray diffraction. CHEM 1211 may be taken concurrently.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: GEOL 1121 Minimum Grade: C and GEOL 1121L and CHEM 1211


GEOL 3024 - Igneous & Metamrphc Petrology
Credits: 4.00
A study of the classification and origin of igneous, and metamorphic rocks. The geologic processes that form these rocks are studied by examining rock samples in the field and laboratory using hand sample, microscopic, and chemical techniques. Petrologic problems are studied at the local, regional, and global scales.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOL 3014 Minimum Grade: C


GEOL 3034 - Structural Geology
Credits: 4.00
The recognition, description, and interpretation of primary and secondary rock-structures. Laboratory and field periods will be spent using both graphical and instrumental techniques necessary for describing and interpreting common structural deformation features. In addition to laboratory and classroom examples, each student is required to complete a lithologic and structural mapping project.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOL 3004 Minimum Grade: C


GEOL 3042 - Optical Mineralogy
Credits: 2.00
Students will be introduced to the Polarizing microscope and to the techniques for the identification of minerals in thin section.
Lab: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOL 1121 and GEOL 1121L


GEOL 3043 - Optic Mineralogy & Petrography
Credits: 3.00
Course will introduce students to the theory and practice of optical mineralogy and petrography; the systematic study of non-opaque rocks and minerals under the microscope.
Lecture: 1.00 Lab: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 3053 - Sedimentary Petrology
Credits: 3.00
The description, classification and interpretation of sedimentary rocks. Using observations from modern sediments, and hand specimens and thin sections of sedimentary rocks, students will apply the principle of uniformity to interpret sedimentary processes and environments.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOL 3014 and GEOL 1122 and GEOL 1122L


GEOL 3603 - Environmental Geology
Credits: 3.00
The interaction between human activity and geologic processes. Included are natural hazards such as earthquakes, landslides, volcanoes, and flooding, human induced problems such as groundwater pollution, erosion and the exploitation of natural resources including rivers, shorelines, petroleum, and ores. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of underlying natural processes and the prediction and mitigation of problems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOL 1121 or GEOG 1113


GEOL 3825 - Research Methods
Credits: 3.00
Specially designed to meet the needs of future teachers, students design and carry out four independent inquiries, which they write up and present in the manner that is common in the scientific community. Course is restricted to UTeach students.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C


GEOL 4003 - Geomorphology
Credits: 3.00
Characteristics, classification, genesis, and evolution of major earth surface features (landforms) and their associations (landscapes). The conceptual framework will involve understanding lithologic, structural, climatic temporal, and process controls. Includes applied aspects of humans as geomorphic agents and geomorphic processes as natural hazards. Topo-graphic map and air photo interpretation will be stressed.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOL 1121 or GEOG 1113


GEOL 4014 - Geochemistry
Credits: 4.00
Chemical realms of the earth and geologic materials, chemistry of geologic processes, geochemical cycles, and special topics.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOL 1121 and GEOL 1121L and CHEM 1211


GEOL 4024 - Paleontology
Credits: 4.00
Classification, biology, distribution and diversity of major invertebrate animals with a fossil record. The course is designed to integrate modern biological concepts as applied to fossil organisms. Students will study fossil organisms to develop an understanding of the principles of evolution, stratigraphic correlation, and paleoecology.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOL 1122 or BIOL 1107


GEOL 4033 - Stratigraphy and Geochronology
Credits: 3.00
Examines the various ways to constrain time in the geologic record, within the context of local, regional, and global change. Students will explore aspects of tectonic, biological and chemical evolution, mainly in sedimentary basins. Students will acquire broad knowledge of major stratigraphic tools and will understand their applications.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOL 3004


GEOL 4034 - Sedimentation and Stratigraphy
Credits: 4.00
Course illustrates how observations from sediments and sedimentary rocks in the field and laboratory can be used to identify formative processes and depositional environments. This methodology is central to the analysis of depositional basins and to an understanding of the geologic time scale.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOL 1121 and GEOL 1121L and GEOL 1122 and GEOL 1122L and GEOL 3014 Minimum Grade: C


GEOL 4044 - Engineering Geology
Credits: 4.00
Introduction to principles of soil and rock mechanics. Discussion and experimental exercises ranging from basic field identification to advanced procedures for estimating soil rock mechanical properties.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: GEOL 3004 Minimum Grade: C


GEOL 4063 - Plate Tectonics
Credits: 3.00
A study of the processes of crustal evolution by plate tectonics. Topics include a brief review of geophysical techniques, discussions of plate tectonics and sea-floor spreading, and a survey of mountain building processes through time.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOL 1121 and GEOL 1122


GEOL 4074 - Regional Applic of Field Geol
Credits: 4.00
An intense, four-week field excursion which provides a variety of field-oriented applications of major geologic principles. This course includes both regional syntheses of geological data and in-depth analysis of specific geological features and areas. Course may be repeated for credit.
Lab: 8.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 4082 - Geological Problems
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Detailed assignments in specific areas of geology. Satisfies deficiencies or permits in-depth pursuit of the student's research in particular geological topics. Title to be supplied at the time of offering.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 4083 - Environmental Geochemistry
Credits: 3.00
The geochemistry of the earth's lithosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere and the human modifications to these systems that cause environmental problems. Special topics include acid rain, greenhouse effect, toxic trace elements, landfills, energy usage and radon.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOL 1121 and CHEM 1211


GEOL 4084 - Hydrogeology
Credits: 4.00
An investigation of groundwater and the earth's hydrologic cycle. Examines the physical aspects of groundwater occurrence and movement, and provides an introduction to contaminant transport and chemical hydrogeology. Lab exercises will acquaint students with hydrogeology field methods and equipment.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOL 1121 and MATH 1113


GEOL 4093 - Risk Assessment
Credits: 3.00
A multidisciplinary investigation into the major societal issue of increasing impacts of natural hazards. Examines property damage and loss of life caused by geologic hazards (earthquakes, landslides, volcanoes), meteorological hazards (hurricanes, tornadoes, floods), and others (fires, technological hazards, biohazards). A major focus will be on social science issue of planning, politics, economics and their control on management of high hazard areas, vulnerability assessments, and mitigation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 4103 - Dinosaurs!
Credits: 3.00
A multidisciplinary investigation into the morphology, classification and identification of the dinosaurs; the environmental, climatic, and geographic conditions on earth during the time of the dinosaurs; and the biological principles involved in understanding the origin, evolution, and extinction of the dinosaurs. Techniques for using dinosaurs to teach children of all ages the fundamentals of science will be explored.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 4203 - Geology of Georgia
Credits: 3.00
Directed toward science and science education majors, this course investigates the geology of the state of Georgia. Students learn fundamental geological principles necessary for deciphering Earth history. The geologic history of Georgia's geologic provinces is explored. Topics include coastal hazards, water in Georgia, landforms and mineral resources of Georgia.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Pre-requisites: GEOL 1121


GEOL 4501 - Geology Seminar
Credits: 1.00
A program of study, discussion, readings, and presentations concerning the significant interrelationships of a wide variety of basic geological concepts. Topics may also include career paths, licensing and other matters concerning the profession of Geology. Advanced geology students, faculty, and outside speakers interact within a seminar framework designed to increase the geological maturity of the students.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 4604 - Economic Geology
Credits: 4.00
Introduction to geology and economics of non-energy mineral resources. Emphasis placed on the descriptive geology and origin of economic mineral concentrations within the context of their overall geologic settings. Lab exercises will involve identification and characterization of representative ore suites from important mineral deposits. Students will complete a research project on exploring for or developing a major ore deposit or mineral/rock resource. A fieldtrip is anticipated to examine the geology, exploration methodology, development, and permitting issues related to mineral/rock production. Students will also prepare for and take the National Association of State Boards of Geology, Fundamentals of Geology (FG) professional licensing exam.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences
Co-requisites:
Pre-requisites: GEOL 3024 and GEOL 3034


GEOL 4985 - Selected Topics in Geology
Credits: 3.00 to 4.00
Title and description of course to be specified at time of offering. May be repeated for credit.
Lecture: 3.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 5003 - Geomorphology
Credits: 3.00
Characteristics, classification, genesis, and evolution of major earth surface features (land forms) and their associations (landscapes). The conceptual framework will involve understanding lithologic, structural, climatic temporal, and process controls. Includes applied aspects of humans as geomorphic agents and geomorphic processes as natural hazards. Topographic map and air photo interpretation will be stressed. Characteristics, classification, genesis, and evolution of major earth surface features (land forms) and their associations (landscapes). The conceptual framework will involve understanding lithologic, structural, climatic temporal, and process controls. Includes applied aspects of humans as geomorphic agents and geomorphic processes as natural hazards. Topographic map and air photo interpretation will be stressed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 5014 - Geochemistry
Credits: 4.00
Chemical realms of the earth and geologic materials, chemistry of geologic processes, geochemical cycles, and special topics.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 5024 - Paleontology
Credits: 4.00
A study of the classification, biology, distribution, and diversity of major invertebrate animals with a fossil record. The course is designed to integrate modern biological concepts as applied to fossil organisms. Students will study fossil organisms to develop an understanding of the principles of evolution, stratigraphic correlation, and paleoecology.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 5034 - Sedimentation and Stratigraphy
Credits: 4.00
A study of the transportation, deposition, and lithification of sediments. Physical, chemical, and biological factors affecting these processes are evaluated. Sedimentary parameters are investigated by mechanical, paleontological, X-ray, and chemical means to determine their temporal and areal relationships.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 5044 - Engineering Geology
Credits: 4.00
Considerations of the geological processes by which commerical deposits of the major metals, non-metals, and fossil fuel are developed. Includes geologic management practices in mineral resources development.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 5063 - Plate Tectonics
Credits: 3.00
A study of the processes of crustal evolution by plate tectonics. Topics include a brief review of geophysical techniques, discussions of plate tectonics and sea floor spreading, and a survey of mountain building processes through time.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 5074 - Regional Applic of Field Geol
Credits: 4.00
An intense, four-week field excursion which provides a variety of field-oriented applications of major geologic principles. This course includes both regional syntheses of geological data and in-depth analysis of specific geological features and areas.
Lab: 8.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 5082 - Geological Problems
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Detailed assignments in specific areas of geology. Satisfies deficiencies or permits in-depth pursuit of the student's research interests in particular geological topics. Title to be supplied at time of offering.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 5083 - Geological Problems
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Detailed assignments in specific areas of geology. Satisfies deficiencies or permits in-depth pursuit of the student's research interests in particular geological topics. Title to be supplied at the time of offering.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 5985 - Selected Topics in Geology
Credits: 3.00 to 4.00
Title and description of course to be specified at time of offering. May be repeated for credit.
Lecture: 3.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 7004 - Earth Science Second Sci Tchr
Credits: 3.00 to 4.00
This course is designed for secondary science teachers with little or no formal background in the earth sciences. Major concepts in the earth science will be developed. Field and laboratory investigations will be emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 7013 - History of Life
Credits: 3.00
This course provides fundamental information about the history of life on Earth, and assists students in discovering and developing resources for teaching this topic to K-12 students. This course will examine the fossil record, evolution, and the history of life on this planet.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 7154 - Earth Science Elementary Tchrs
Credits: 3.00 to 4.00
An introduction to the basic principles of Earth Science designed to provide teachers with insights into the interrelationships between geological processes, earth materials, sea floors, and climates. Field experience is included.
Lecture: 3.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 7203 - Oceanography for Teachers
Credits: 3.00
Presents fundamental principles, concepts, and information about the oceans for science and non-science teachers. Emphasis will be placed on development of teaching tools for application in the classroom.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 Other: .00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 7584 - Sel Top for Elementary Tchrs
Credits: 3.00 to 4.00
Study in any of the several branches of natural science. Credit allowable only for students enrolled in graduate programs in Education. May be repeated for credit.
Lecture: 3.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences


GEOL 7594 - Sel Top for Secondary Tchrs
Credits: 3.00 to 4.00
Study in any of the several branches of natural science. Credit allowable only for students enrolled in graduate programs in Education. May be repeated for credit.
Lecture: 3.00 to 4.00 Lab: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Geosciences



Georgia Film Academy

Georgia Film Academy


GFA 1000 - GFA Intro On-Set Film Prod
CEUs: .00 to 6.00
This course is the first of an 18-credit hour certificate program which provides an introduction to the skills used in on-set film production, including all forms of narrative media which utilize film-industry standard organizational structure, professional equipment and on-set procedures. In addition to the use of topical lectures, PowerPoint presentations, videos and hand-outs, the course includes demonstrations of equipment and set operations as well as hands-on learning experiences. Students will learn: film production organizational structure, job descriptions and duties in various film craft areas, names, uses and protocols related to various pieces of professional on-set film equipment. Students will also learn, through lecture and exercises, how the various film crafts relate to one-another on a working set, as well as how and why they all must operate in sync. In addition, students will learn skills related to networking and self-marketing.
Lecture: .00 to 3.00 Lab: .00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities


GFA 2000 - GFA Film & TV Prod Internship
CEUs: .00 to 6.00
Upon successful completion of GFA Course 1, the GFA Film & Television Production Internship course is a 6-hour option as part of the 18 credit hours needed for the Georgia Film Academy (GFA) Certification Program. The course is designed to provide students with a basic level of on-set film production skills, knowledge and experience with film-industry standards, organizational structure, professional equipment and on-set procedures by giving students hands-on experience on the sets and offices of working film productions and businesses. Students will also have an opportunity to network and to build resumes in order to help market themselves with the intention of integrating into the film industry as entry-level workers. All productions will be conducted under the auspices of a professional production entity, production company studio or film business. All aspects of on-set and production office activities will be conducted at a level of professional standards common to the film industry. Particular emphasis will be placed on safety and the recognition and application of industry-standard safety practices. While some of the GFA Internship course will feature a more in-depth analysis of the various production crafts, the bulk of the course will focus on professional-level projects, on which students will have active roles in on-set and production office crafts.
Other: .00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Co-requisites:


GFA 2010 - GFA Set Construction & Paint
CEUs: .00 to 6.00
This course is designed to equip students with entry-level skills and knowledge of set construction for the film and television industry. Students will participate in goal oriented class projects including reading blueprints, set safety, use of power tools, carpentry, scenic paint and sculpting. A large emphasis will be placed on set etiquette including, but not limited to, attitude, professionalism and technique on and off set.
Lecture: .00 to 3.00 Lab: .00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities


GFA 2020 - GFA Lighting and Electric
CEUs: .00 to 6.00
This course is designed to equip students with the skills and knowledge of electrical distribution and set lighting on a motion picture or episodic television set in order to facilitate their entry and advancement in the film business. Students will participate in goal oriented class projects including power distribution, set protocol and etiquette, properly setting lamps, department lingo, how to light a set to feature film standards, motion picture photography, etc. A large emphasis will be placed on set etiquette including, but not limited to, attitude, professionalism and technique on and off set.
Lecture: .00 to 3.00 Lab: .00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities


GFA 2030 - GFA Grip & Rigging
CEUs: .00 to 6.00
Grip & Rigging is an introduction and orientation to the practice of rigging and supporting grip equipment, cameras, vehicles and other physical/mechanical devices. In addition to a gaining a thorough knowledge of the equipment used in grip and rigging, students will engage in on-set exercises in inventory, maintenance, set-up, trouble-shooting, teamwork, set protocol and safety.
Lecture: .00 to 3.00 Lab: .00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities


GFA 2040 - GFA Post Prod/AVID Editing
CEUs: .00 to 6.00
This course is designed to certify students with Avid Media Composer User Certification. This certification is recognized worldwide as the industry standard for assistant editors in feature films and broadcast television. This course will equip students with a unique skillset and knowledge of industry standard digital imaging, editorial process and story forging on both motion picture and episodic nonlinear productions. At the end of the course the students will be qualified to advance a career in entertainment post production of film and television.
Lecture: .00 to 3.00 Lab: .00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities


GFA 2050 - GFA Special Makeup Effects
CEUs: .00 to 6.00
This course is designed to educate students with entry-level skills and knowledge in practical Special Effects (SFX) Makeup for the film and television industry. Students will participate in goal-oriented class projects including fabrication, material safety, using casting materials, professional make-up, sculpting, airbrushing, and design.
Lecture: .00 to 3.00 Lab: .00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities


GFA 2060 - GFA Production Acct & Office
CEUs: 6.00
This course is designed to give students a broad understanding of work in and surrounding the Production Accounting and Production Office departments. Students will learn the fundamentals for working within and succeeding through the Production Office or Accounting Department in the film and television industry. In this course, students will be able to identify the key players in each department and define their responsibilities. The Production Office component of this course will focus on the relationship between the Production Office and the overall production and the importance of the communication hub that exists between the Office, Set and Post. The Accounting component of this course will focus on the accounting guidelines and reporting practices that are used to track and manage the finances of a production. Practical elements will be created through the use of actual production software and scenario simulations. This course is intended for students with little to no experience in television and film production who wish to understand the larger importance of how the Production Office and Production Accounting departments affect production with effective communication, organization and problem-solving skills.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities


GFA 3010 - GFA Production Design I
CEUs: 6.00
This course is designed to examine the process of Production Design as it relates to the film and television industry. Students will work on an assigned project and take it from concept to completion solving real-world challenges with the skills they have learned in class. Assigned projects will allow them the hands-on experience they need. A large emphasis will be placed on set etiquette, including but not limited to task completion, teamwork, attitude, professionalism, and punctuality. This class will include assigned reading from various books, web articles and periodicals. It will also include video lessons and use of Vectorworks Student Software.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: eMajor


GFA 3020 - Motion Picture Set Lighting
CEUs: 6.00
This course will equip students with the skills and knowledge of electrical distribution and set lighting on a motion picture or episodic television set in order to facilitate their entry and advancement in the film business. Students will participate in goal-oriented class projects including power distribution, set protocol and etiquette, properly setting lamps, department lingo, lighting a set to feature film standards, motion picture photography, and other crucial skills to work in the set lighting department. A large emphasis will be placed on set etiquette including, but not limited to, participation in exercises, attitude, professionalism and technique on and off set. This course also introduces lighting on location, providing students with the opportunity to rig and light the most common situations a set lighting crew faces – day exteriors, day interiors, night exteriors and night interiors. In preparation for lighting a particular location, students will participate in location scouting to ascertain all resources needed – equipment, man power and time. Upon completion of this course, students will have a solid and broad base of knowledge of the equipment, techniques, communications, specifications, and a complete understanding of the behavior of light and how to manipulate/control it to feature film standards.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: eMajor


GFA 3140 - GFA Prof Asst Sound Engineerin
CEUs: 6.00
This course is designed to certify and equip students with a unique skillset and knowledge of the Digital Audio editorial process in order to facilitate their entry and advancement in the entertainment post-production industry. Students will have the opportunity to certify as an “Avid Technology ProTools User.” More specifically, students learn and may certify in industry best practices for the digital audio process within an industry-standard sound department. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be ready to enter the film industry as a working digital audio technician and/or assistant digital audio technician. The student will have the opportunity to achieve a globally recognized certification in Avid ProTools 100 level curriculum. Upon completion, students will have a broad base of knowledge that will allow him or her to integrate with a digital audio team from the first day. This knowledge includes, but is not limited to, the equipment, techniques, communications, specifications, etc. used in the digital audio department.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities


GFA 3500 - Fundamentals of Esports
CEUs: 6.00
This course provides students with basic skills and insight to support running an esports tournament event in addition to exposure to the numerous career paths and skills within the esports industry. Students will become oriented with the esports ecosystem and job families therein, including: Game Publishing, Tournament & League Operation, Live Production, Event Management, Broadcast Distribution, On-Air Talent, Team Organization, Sponsorship & Marketing, Community & Social Management. In addition, students will learn the basic terminology across these functions and skills related to networking and self-marketing used within the game development and esports industry. A team project allows students to design and execute their own esports online tournament event incorporating lessons learned during the course.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: eMajor


GFA 4040 - GFA Prof Editing - Post Prod
CEUs: 6.00
Students who successfully complete this course and pass the embedded Avid Media Composer Professional Editing 1 (MC 20)1 and Media Composer Professional Editing II (MC 210) exams will earn the industry post-production credential of Avid Certified Professional in Media Composer. With the step-by-step guidance from an Avid Certified Professional Instructor in this course, students will learn the skills needed to optimize editing workflows, streamline and ingest processes and manage media. Students will learn advanced picture editing techniques, how to quickly prepare for multi-cam editing and how to work with graphics and mattes. This course also covers compositing with the 3D Warp effect, color correction and an in-depth look at some of the wide range of audio tools and effects included in Media Composer. Focusing on real-world workflows, Media Composer Professional Editing takes students to a new and higher level of editing, providing in-depth knowledge to distinguish as an industry-recognized, true editing professional.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Pre-requisites: GFA 2040



Global Studies

Global Studies


GLOB 4000 - Capstone Seminar
Credits: 3.00
This Capstone seminar is designed to integrate the various experiences of students in their interdisciplinary endeavors. Specific aspects of globalization will be examined at an advanced level.
Lecture: 3.00
College: University College
Department: Interdisciplinary Studies Ctr


GLOB 4186 - Internship in Global Studies
Credits: 1.00 to 9.00
Students may receive academic credit for personal experience in the field of global studies. Credit hours apply toward the major.
Lab: 1.00 to 9.00
College: University College
Department: Interdisciplinary Studies Ctr
Pre-requisites: XIDS 2301


GLOB 4981 - Drctd Rdgs in Global Studies
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
In depth, individualized research on specific global problems and issues.

College: University College
Department: Interdisciplinary Studies Ctr
Pre-requisites: XIDS 2301


GLOB 4985 - Problems in Global Studies
Credits: 3.00
Specialized areas of analysis in a subfield of global studies with the specific titles announces in the class schedule and entered on the students' transcripts. Students may repeat the course for credit as topics change.
Lecture: 3.00
College: University College
Department: Interdisciplinary Studies Ctr
Pre-requisites: XIDS 2301



German

German


GRMN 1001 - Elementary German I
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the German language and the culture of the German-speaking world. Beginning of a survey of basic German grammar and the development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Some aspects of everyday life in the German-speaking world will also be introduced. Institutional option: Work with other media (audio, video, and/or computer) outside of class is required.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Co-requisites:


GRMN 1001C - Elementary German I - Block
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the German language and the culture of the German-speaking world. Beginning of a survey of basic German grammar and the development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Some aspects of everyday life in the German-speaking world will also be introduced. Institutional option: Work with other media (audio, video, and/or computer) outside of class is required.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Co-requisites: GRMN 1002C


GRMN 1002 - Elementary German II
Credits: 3.00
The second part of an introduction to the German language and culture of the German-speaking world. Completion of the survey of basic German grammar and further development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Aspects of everyday life in the German-speaking world will also be introduced. Institutional Option: Work with other media (audio, video, and/or computer) outside of class is required.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: GRMN 1001 Minimum Grade: C or GRMN 1001C Minimum Grade: C


GRMN 1002C - Elementary German II - Block
Credits: 3.00
The second part of an introduction to the German language and culture of the Germanspeaking world. Completion of the survey of basic German grammar and further development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Aspects of everyday life in the German-speaking world will also be introduced. Institutional Option: Work with other media (audio, video, and/or computer) outside of class is required.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: GRMN 1001C Minimum Grade: C


GRMN 2001 - Intermediate German I
Credits: 3.00
This is the third course in a four-course sequence and is open to students with three years of high school or two semesters of college German or the equivalent.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: GRMN 1002 Minimum Grade: C or GER 102 Minimum Grade: C or GRMN 1002C Minimum Grade: C


GRMN 2002 - Intermediate German II
Credits: 3.00
This is the fourth course in a four-course sequence and is open to students with four years of high school or three semesters of college German or the equivalent.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: GRMN 2001 Minimum Grade: C or GER 103 Minimum Grade: C


GRMN 3101 - Conversational German
Credits: 3.00
Intensive practice of spoken German with emphasis on the expansion of vocabulary, idiom, and cultural awareness as well as enhanced skill in pronunciation and expression. May be taken multiple times for credit with different content and instructor approval.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: GRMN 2002 or GER 104


GRMN 3102 - German Composition
Credits: 3.00
Acquisition of organizational and writing skills through grammar review and expansion, vocabulary enhancement, and compositions based on contemporary and cultural topics. May be taken multiple times for credit with different content and instructor permission.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: GRMN 2002 or GER 104


GRMN 3450 - German for Careers
Credits: 3.00
A variable content course with emphasis on the vocabularies and culture of economics/business or the social sciences.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: GRMN 2002 Minimum Grade: D or GER 104 Minimum Grade: D


GRMN 3986 - Total Immersion in German
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Participants in this course will agree to speak only German for a specified amount of time, from 48 hours to three weeks. Students are required to participate in organized events and activities including films, tasks such as cooking or clean-up, discussion, and games, all facilitating student communication in German. Some quiet study and reading periods will allow consolidation of vocabulary gains and help relieve stress, a natural and necessary component of total immersion. The total immersion experience is highly intense and sometimes uncomfortable, but often produces remarkable results in terms of increased fluency.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


GRMN 4170 - Advanced Language Skills
Credits: 3.00
An intensive and extensive study of the principles governing the structure of the German language. In this course students will refine and extend their language skills.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: GRMN 3101 or GRMN 3102


GRMN 4200 - Seminar in German Literature
Credits: 3.00
Variable content ranging from literary periods, genres, or authors, such as Romanticism, the Novelle, or the Age of Goethe.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


GRMN 4210 - Turn of Cent.Grmn/Austran Cult
Credits: 3.00
This course will analyze a variety of texts- short stories, plays, novels, films, architecture, and painting -- from and about turn of the century Germany and Austria, with some emphasis on cultural and ideological practices. Discussion, papers and texts will be in German. Students may not receive credit for GRMN 4210 and the XIDS course of the same title.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: GRMN 2002


GRMN 4220 - German Culture through Film
Credits: 3.00
This course offers an introduction to 20th century history and culture through the depictions and interpretations of aspects of social history in German film and painting. Discussions and papers will be in German. Students may not receive credit for GRMN 4220 and the XIDS course of the same title.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: GRMN 2002


GRMN 4230 - Kafka & Kafkaesque in Lit/Flm
Credits: 3.00
This course offers in introduction to Kafka's life and work and examines his influence on 20th century thought and art. In the process we will both broaden and personalize our understandings of 'kafkaesque', that most fashionable of adjectives. Discussion, papers and readings will be in German. Students may not receive credit for GRMN 4230 and the XIDS course of the same title.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: GRMN 2002


GRMN 4240 - Mystery/Horror in Grmn Lit/Flm
Credits: 3.00
This course traces the mystery and horror genres from their 'beginnings' in German Romanticism through early German film (including emigres to Hollywood and Hitchcock, who was schooled in Germany) to New German Film of the 70's and 80's Discussion, readings and paper will be in German. Students may not receive credit for GRMN 4240 and XIDS course of the same title.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: GRMN 2002


GRMN 4250 - Contemporary German Cinema
Credits: 3.00
German cinema has changed radically in the past twenty years moving more and more toward Hollywood styles, big budgets, Hollywood ideologies. We will trace this change in German cinema from the days of the New German Cinema and its highly intellectual and artistic goals (Fassbinder, Wenders, Herzog, von Trotta, Schlondorff) to today's much more co-opted German film industry(Tykwer, Farberbock, Peterson, Kraume, and Ruzowitzsky).
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: GRMN 2002


GRMN 4260 - Austrian Literature/Culture
Credits: 3.00
This course will examine a selection of representative works of Austrian culture, including literature, music, and the visual arts, within the context of Austrian history from the time of the Hapsburg Empire to the present day Austrian Republic. Discussion, readings, and writing assignments are in German.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: GRMN 2002


GRMN 4300 - German Civilization
Credits: 3.00
Taught in English. Recommended for students minoring in German, but does not count in the minor.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


GRMN 4484 - Senior Capstone
Credits: 1.00
Students prepare individual electronic portfolios in which they assess their linguistic and cultural knowledge. Students will be required to pass an oral proficiency interview.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


GRMN 4501 - Foreign Lng Tchng Elem Schools
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed for students seeking a degree in Foreign Language Education. The objective is to prepare qualified foreign language teachers for elementary school. This course treats the principles of foreign language methodology applied to elementary school teaching, and includes class observations, planning of instruction, and field experience.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: ( EDF 201 or EDFD 2303 ) and ( CEP 270 or CEPD 2102 )


GRMN 4502 - Methods of Foreign Lng Tching
Credits: 3.00
A course designed for students to develop skills and strategies in teaching and in planning foreign language instruction at the secondary level.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: ( EDF 201 or EDFD 2303 ) and ( CEP 270 or CEPD 2102 )


GRMN 4785 - Special Topics in German
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Readings, reports, and/or directed study abroad.
Lecture: .00 to 3.00 Lab: .00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


GRMN 4986 - Internship in Germany
Credits: 1.00 to 5.00
In addition to working in a German company in Germany, students must at least furnish a long written report on the work experiences. Additional requirements are added for each additional hour of credit. May be repeated up to two times for a maximum of 5 hours credit. The grade is based upon the quality of the written products and on an interview with the returning stude
Lab: 1.00 to 5.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures
Pre-requisites: GRMN 1002


GRMN 5300 - German Civilization
Credits: 3.00
Taught in English. Recommended for teachers or other students interested in an area of study. Also serves graduate students in some M.A. programs as a foreign language alternative.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


GRMN 5501 - Foreign Lng Tchng Elem Schools
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed for students seeking a degree in Foreign Language Education. The objective is to prepare qualified foreign language teachers for elementary school. This course treats the principles of foreign language methodology applied to elementary school teaching, and includes class observations, planning of instruction, and field experience.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


GRMN 6050 - The Holocaust in Grmn Lit&Film
Credits: 3.00
An in-depth analysis of literary and filmic texts about the Holocaust. The focus will be on whether works that are essentially propaganda and that perpetuate and valorize the antisemitic ideology promulgated by Hitler can at all be called 'literary and artistic.' The place of the Holocaust in U.S. culture will also be analyzed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


GRMN 6100 - Women in 20th Century Germany
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on the changing roles of women in Germany between 1880 and the present day. Students will study German history, the representation of women in German film and literature, and the literary, filmic, and intellectual contributions women themselves have made to German Culture in several spheres: politics, literature, film, music, and art.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


GRMN 6111 - History of German Film
Credits: 3.00
A survey of German Film from the early silent films to the present. Students will examine German culture and history through film. Special emphasis is placed on understanding and analyzing ideological, historical, and cultural processes that films both initiate and reflect.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


GRMN 6170 - Advanced Language Skills
Credits: 3.00
Emphasizes final mastery of basic structures and development of the speaker's ability to understand and correctly use more complicated ones. Students will read more extensive and more difficult texts and integrate some of the features in them into their own writing and speaking.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures


GRMN 6785 - Topics in German Studies
Credits: 3.00
This course will have variable content and may also be used for guided individual student readings and projects. It could focus on an author (Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka), period (20th-century, Weimar, post-war), filmmaker (Rainer Fassbinder, Tom Tykwer), a literary or filmic movement (New German Cinema, Expressionism), or a theme (the outsider, ambiguity, violence). Such courses are typically informed by individual faculty specialty or current research interest and so offer students potential access to professional-level skills and methods. This course may be taken multiple times under different names.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: Intl Languages & Cultures



Higher Educ Student Affairs

Higher Educ Student Affairs


HESA 6170 - Found of College Stud Affairs
CEUs: 3.00
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of student affairs and its role within the context of American higher education. The course will examine the philosophical, historical, and theoretical foundations of the profession, and students will learn about the cultural and organizational contexts of student affairs work. It will introduce students to the various functional areas within student affairs, diversity of institutional types and student populations, and contemporary issues of the profession, and provide them with a broad foundation of knowledge to which subsequent study, practitioner skills, and research strategies may be added.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 6172 - Theories of Collg Stud Develop
CEUs: 3.00
This course will introduce students to human development theories that most affect college students. The course will examine psychosocial, cognitive, structural and typological theories, with a focus on learning to use theory to improve our work with students. It also examines how race, culture, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, disability, and religious beliefs can influence development.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 6174 - Higher Education Admin
CEUs: 3.00
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to higher education, with an emphasis on understanding the practical skills necessary to be a successful administrator.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 6175 - Student Affairs Practicum
CEUs: 3.00
We are changing the prefix of our college student affairs and higher education courses with a new prefix that better identifies the courses as higher education/student affairs courses rather than professional counseling courses. Courses with the CEPD prefix are being deleted and new courses with the HESA prefix (Higher Education and Student Affairs) are being added.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 6176 - Campus Crisis,Ethcl,&Legl Iss
CEUs: 3.00
This course will introduce students to legal and ethical issues confronting student affairs practitioners, including key concepts, federal law, and court cases. This course also provides a brief introduction to the theory and practice of crisis intervention and trauma counseling as it relates to crisis response on college campuses. Students will be prepared to recognize, understand, and respond to the needs of individuals who are experiencing or have experienced community level crises, disasters, or trauma.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 6177 - Theory & Assess of Educ Enviro
CEUs: 3.00
The purpose of this course is to focus on the dimensions of human environments as tools for understanding the effects of colleges and universities on students. Theories of human environments will be applied to an understanding of various educational settings, with consideration given to the policies that guide and applications that shape educational practice.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 6178 - The American College Student
CEUs: 3.00
This course will introduce students to the theoretical and research literature with respect to student characteristics and the effects of college on students.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 6179 - Capstone Seminar:Stud Affairs
CEUs: 3.00
This seminar is designed to promote the integration of the core curriculum and practitioner experiences of the master's degree program in College Student Affairs and to prepare students for their transition to professional positions within student affairs upon graduation. Students will develop and present a professional portfolio.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 7145 - Advocacy and Leadership
CEUs: 3.00
This course emphasizes 'theory to practice' by providing experiences that allow students to assess and develop their personal leadership while emphasizing the values, knowledge and skills required for effective advocacy and brokering of services through consultation and collaboration. Special emphasis is placed on the development of skills in planning, organizing, coordinating and delivering programs that generate systematic change. Use of data to identify needs, remove barriers and mobilize resources in higher education in order to affect change.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 7152 - Research and Program Evaluatio
CEUs: 3.00
This course is designed to provide college student affairs candidates with the research knowledge and skills necessary to understand and conduct research for practical implications in a higher education environment. An emphasis will be placed on the collection and use of quantitative and qualitative data to evaluate programs.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9210 - History of Higher Education
CEUs: 3.00
A review of the historical progression of higher education and an introduction into the contemporary issues confronting higher education today with a focus on the relationship between the historical perspectives of higher education and its relationship to current practice.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9211 - Organizational Theory
CEUs: 3.00
Review of organizational theories that contribute to the development of human capital and effective operating systems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9212 - Advanced Seminar in Leadershp
CEUs: 3.00
Students will study several theoretical perspectives that have gained some credibility and research basis over the last several decades. Literature and theory will be reviewed to inform students of the individual role of leadership and its ability to envision, plan, and affect change in organizations and persons.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9213 - Crit Iss & Trends in Higher Ed
CEUs: 3.00
Utilizing a historical perspective of higher education, students will review critical issues affecting higher education. Students will think critically about these issues and develop a plan using theory and literature to address a critical issue in higher education.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9214 - Analysis of Higher Ed Lit
CEUs: 3.00
The literature in higher education is vast and this course is designed to introduce students to that literature in a way that not only informs their practice, but also helps them evaluate the literature from an analytical lens. By reviewing the literature, this course will also afford students the opportunity to begin evaluating resources for the dissertation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9215 - Adv Legal Iss & Policy Analysi
CEUs: 3.00
Review and analyze current legal issues and public policy influencing higher education with an emphasis on the method of analysis and interpretation of the legal issue and public policy as it is applied to higher education.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9216 - Values & Ethics in Higher Ed
CEUs: 3.00
Involves knowledge, skills, and dispositions that connect the values and ethics of the student affairs profession to one's current professional practice.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9217 - Diversity Issues in Higher Edu
CEUs: 3.00
Consideration of the process and goal for including knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to create learning environments that foster equitable participation of all groups in a higher education setting while seeking to address and acknowledge the issues of oppression, privilege, and power.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9218 - Higher Ed Finance & Advancemen
CEUs: 3.00
The development and management of finances, capital projects, and university advancement is the focus of this course. Budget development and project management is also included.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9219 - Governance in Higher Education
CEUs: 3.00
Application of organizational theory as it relates to the governance structure of higher education. Governance topics include, but are not limited to, various reporting structures in the world as it relates to governance of higher education, human capital, formal evaluation of staff, and use of physical resources to enhance current organizational structures in higher education.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9220 - Enrollment Management
CEUs: 3.00
Enrollment management strategies and theories in higher education that facilitate practice in the areas of retention, progression, and graduation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9221 - Qual Resrch in a Higher Ed Env
CEUs: 3.00
This course focuses on the use of qualitative methods of research, including theoretical perspectives and methods of collection and analysis of qualitative data sources relevant to a higher education environment. It emphasizes analysis of work samples, observations, inquiry data, artifacts, and other sources of data. Students become skilled at using methods of qualitative research to evaluate issues in colleges and universities. In addition, students examine strategies for thematic and other forms of analysis of observational and inquiry data.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9222 - Quant Resrch in a Higher Ed En
CEUs: 3.00
This course introduces the graduate student to basic methods of empirical inquiry used in higher education. Quantitative research designs commonly used in higher education are emphasized. Students will learn how to select samples, identify appropriate measurement instruments, analyze data descriptively, and apply a variety of inferential statistical tests to answer research questions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9223 - Applied Research Practices
CEUs: 3.00
Utilizing content from previous research courses, this class will emphasize the application of research practices to higher education utilizing qualitative and quantitative research designs.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9224 - Inst Assess & Prog Effective
CEUs: 3.00
Interpreting data sets as they relate to colleges and universities will be analyzed as well as strategies that determine whether programs are effective in meeting their stated goals and objectives.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9225 - Directed Doctoral Research
CEUs: 3.00
Individual inquiry on a research problem consisting of a plan for data collection and analysis, as well as, critical review, integration and interpretation of research literature for the dissertation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling


HESA 9999 - Dissertation
CEUs: 1.00 to 12.00
The dissertation experience requires the designing and conducting of an independent scholarly inquiry guided by a faculty dissertation committee.
Lecture: 1.00 to 12.00
College: College of Education
Department: Comm Sci & Prof Counseling



History

History


HIST 1111 - Surv World History/Civiliz I
Credits: 3.00
A survey of global history to 1500. This course examines ancient and medieval civilizations to deepen understanding of the political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of World history. Emphasis is given to comparative themes, the study of causal relationships and patterns of change and continuity over time; and the social significance of ethnicity, gender, race, and class in historical events and study.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 1112 - Surv World History/Civiliz II
Credits: 3.00
A survey of global history from 1500 to the present. Beginning with European oceanic expansion and the emergence of a global network of exchange, this course examines the impact of major technologies, economic systems, political ideologies, and cultural traditions that unite and divide the human community. Emphasis is given to the study of causal relationships and patterns of change and continuity over time, as well as the social significance of ethnicity, gender, race, and class in historical events and study.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 2111 - U S History I (to 1865)
Credits: 3.00
Explores the major themes and issues in American history from early settlement through the end of the American Civil War. Emphasizes the political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of United States history; causal relationships and patterns of change and continuity over time; and the significance of ethnicity, gender, race, and class in historical events.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 2112 - U S History II (since 1865)
Credits: 3.00
Explores the major themes and issues in American history from the end of the American Civil War to the present. Emphasizes the political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of United States history; causal relationships and patterns of change and continuity over time; and the significance of ethnicity, gender, race, and class in historical events.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 2302 - The Historian's Craft:Methdlgy
Credits: 3.00
Examination of history as a discipline and as a craft, concentrating on the research and interpretive skills used by historians. Should be taken in the second year of the history major's degree program.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3300 - Studies in American Culture
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to American Studies as an area of critical inquiry, including a study of the theories and methods used in the field and readings of significant works that have shaped it. Required for a minor in American Studies. Same as ENGL 3300.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3301 - Hist and Phil of Science
Credits: 3.00
A study of the historical development of major areas of science and the philosophical examination of scientific methods and results.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3311 - Ancient Near East/Classic Wrld
Credits: 3.00
The development of ancient Near Eastern, Greek and Roman civilizations and their impact on the development of western civilization.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3312 - Near East in Middle Ages
Credits: 3.00
The development of Byzantine and Islamic Civilizations and their impact on the development of modern Eastern Europe, Balkans, Near East, and North Africa.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3313 - Near East in Modern Times
Credits: 3.00
A political social, economic, cultural and religious survey of the Balkans, Near East and North Africa, from the Ottoman Empire to the present.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3315 - Civilization of India
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to socio-cultural history of the Indian subcontinent focusing on the formative culture, and Western impact, the synthesis emerging in the 20th century, and the spread of Indian ideas to East and Southeast Asia. Students will normally be expected to have taken the basic courses in U.S. and Global History.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3318 - Afrca thrgh Era of Slve Trade
Credits: 3.00
Selected themes in Pre-colonial African history: foundations of human settlement, the impact of religions, trade, state formation. The course will cover various regional developments from antiquity to the eve of European conquest.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3319 - Modern Africa, 1820-Present
Credits: 3.00
An survey of modern Africa from the end of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade to the present.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 or HIST 2111 or HIST 2112


HIST 3321 - Western Europe in Middle Ages
Credits: 3.00
The development of Medieval Latin Civilization and its impact on the development of Modern Europe.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3323 - 17th and 18th Century Europe
Credits: 3.00
A political, social, economic and cultural study of Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3326 - Colonial Latin America
Credits: 3.00
A survey of Latin America from the pre-Columbian period through 1830, with special emphasis on the conquest, colonial administration and economy, race and society, international rivalries, and separation from Spain and Portugal.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3327 - Latin Amer Since Independence
Credits: 3.00
A topical analysis of Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean states since c. 1820.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3341 - Britain to 1688
Credits: 3.00
From the Roman invasion to the Glorious Revolution, this course examines the key events, institutions, and individuals responsible for the creation of a British kingdom and its emergence as a European power.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3342 - Britain since 1688
Credits: 3.00
This class examines the political, economic, social, and cultural history of Britain and its empire from the Glorious Revolution to the present.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3350 - Intro to Africana Studies
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to Africana studies as an area of critical inquiry, including a study of the theories and methods used in the field and readings of significant works that have shaped it. Required for the minor in Africana studies. Same as ENGL 3350.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3351 - Imperial Russia
Credits: 3.00
An examination of social, political, economic and cultural development in Russian history from Peter the Great to the Revolution of 1917.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3361 - American Diplomacy
Credits: 3.00
History of American foreign policy from the Revolution to the present.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3362 - African-Amer History to 1865
Credits: 3.00
A survey history of African-Americans in the United States from the African past through the American Civil War.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3363 - African-Amer History Snc 1865
Credits: 3.00
A survey history of African-Americans in the United States from 1865 to the present, with emphasis on the evolution of black leadership in the twentieth century.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 3500 - Junior Historiography Seminar
Credits: 3.00
This course aims to prepare students for Senior Seminar by focusing on analysis of historiographical debate and by guiding students in developing a prospectus for their own future research. Topics vary with instructors. This course is writing-intensive. Prerequisite: HIST 2302 Methodology 3 credits
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: HIST 2302


HIST 4010 - Teaching Methods for History
Credits: 3.00
This course is intended to introduce students to the practice of teaching history. It is designed to help students succeed as history educators. We will focus on developing the skills necessary to teach history effectively by incorporating the latest scholarship with the newest technological innovations and pedagogical strategies. We will also work with primary sources, identifying exceptional sources and developing strategies for students to engage these sources. This course will devote special attention to developing teaching strategies for students enrolled in middle grades (6-8) and high school (9-12). Students will also learn to use the Georgia and National Performance Standards (Common Core) to develop history curriculum.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: HIST 1111 and HIST 1112 and HIST 2111 and HIST 2112 and HIST 2302


HIST 4101 - Professionalism in Public Prac
Credits: 1.00
This course introduces students to careers in Public History and provides training for professional practice. Students gain experience researching professional opportunities, crafting resumes, preparing for interviews, and practicing professional communication.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4209 - Greek and Roman Warfare
Credits: 3.00
This course surveys the main developments in the mechanics of Greek and Roman warfare weapons, strategy, and tactics from the Mycenaean period to the Byzantine Empire. At the same time, attention will be paid to the function of warfare in society, and its impact on political and social history.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 4210 - Pagans & Christians Late Antiq
Credits: 3.00
This course considers the history of the interactions between Christians and the adherents of other religions in the Roman Empire from the 30's AD to the early fifth century AD.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 4230 - War, State & Soc Early Mod Eur
Credits: 3.00
An exploration of the relationship between military, social, and political factors in Europe from the 1400s to the end of the 1700s.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4231 - The Reformation
Credits: 3.00
The development of the Roman Catholic and Protestant religious traditions, seen within the context of 16th and 17th century Europe.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4232 - The Enlightenment
Credits: 3.00
An exploration of the movement that dominated intellectual and cultural developments in 18th century Europe, seen within its broader political, social, and economic context.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4235 - France Before the Revolution
Credits: 3.00
Traces the development of the French monarchical state from the 15th to the 18th century, when France became a dominant European power.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4250 - The First World War
Credits: 3.00
Examines the political, economic, social, cultural, and military history of what George Kennan called the seminal catastrophe of the twentieth century.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4251 - The Second World War
Credits: 3.00
HIST 4251/5251 The Second World War This course explores the Second World War, focusing primarily on the history of the military campaigns in Europe and the Pacific. It also examines topics such as the economic sinews of war, civil-military relations, technology and warfare, wartime diplomacy, and war and atrocity.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: HIST 1112


HIST 4285 - Special Topics European Hist
Credits: 3.00
Courses on European history topics not usually offered by the department.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 4301 - Latin American Women
CEUs: 3.00
This class examines the lives and experiences of Latin American women through the sub-themes of sexuality, religion, labor, social movements, populism, liberalism, race, and class in order to debunk traditional misconceptions and stereotypes about Latin American women and focus on their influence and contribution to an otherwise commonly perceived male-dominated culture and society.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4302 - Intro to Digital Historory
CEUs: 3.00
This course explores how digital techniques are altering the study of history and raising new possibilities and new challenges. This class will introduce students to the theories, practices, and technologies used in the field of digital history and digital humanities more broadly. Course will provide students with a foundational understanding and hands-on experience with different approaches and technologies for collecting, analyzing, preserving, and representing the past.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 4303 - History of the Carribean
CEUs: 3.00
This course is designed as an introduction to the history and civilization of the Caribbean Basin, defined as the West Indies and the nearby coastal areas of Central and South America. It examines the contributions of Native American, African, and European peoples and cultures to the region from the fifteenth century to the present.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4310 - Comparative Slavery & Emancipa
Credits: 3.00
This course takes a comparative approach to the history of trans-Atlantic slavery and emancipation as it developed in different regions and social contexts in the Atlantic World from the 15th through 19th centuries.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4385 - Special Topic World History
Credits: 3.00
Courses on topics in world history not usually offered by the department.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 4400 - Introduction to Public History
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the development, philosophies, and activities in the field of public history and the ethical issues which public historians face.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4401 - Theory & Pract of Oral History
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the philosophy, ethics, and practice of oral history, with specific training in interview and transcription techniques, and the use of oral history in historical research and analysis.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4402 - Intro to Archival Thry/Pract
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the principles of archival theory and management from appraisal and acquisitions through arrangement, description, preservation, and public access. Includes a practicum experience.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4403 - Intro to Museum Studies
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the philosophy, theory and practice of museum work and a survey of various functions of a museum, including collections, research, education and interpretation, exhibits, and administration.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4404 - Hist of Amer Architecture
Credits: 3.00
A survey of American architecture in its social and cultural context from colonial America through the present, with a particular focus on how to analyze and document historic buildings.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4411 - Europ Renaiss Global Perspect
Credits: 3.00
Europe in the early modern era, focusing on the cultural and political history of the Renaissance, the development of overseas empires and the evolution of a scientific world view.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4413 - The Atlantic World 1450-1800
Credits: 3.00
A transnational perspective emphasizing connections between Europe, Africa, and the Americas from the period of European maritime exploration to the age of revolution. Topics include the expansion of empires and mercantile capitalism, slavery and the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and interactions between Europeans, Africans and Native Americans.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4414 - French America
Credits: 3.00
Explores French colonial efforts in North America and the Caribbean from the 16th to the 19th centuries, including Canada, Louisiana, and Haiti.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4417 - 19th Century Europe,1789-1914
Credits: 3.00
Study of European, social, cultural and political history from 1789 to 1914, with particular emphasis on how different cultures and classes understood Europe's lurch into modernity. Prerequisites: 3 credits global history; 3 credits U.S. history; or permission.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4418 - 20th Century Europe
Credits: 3.00
A study of the political and social history of Europe in the 20th century with emphasis on the continuity of events and their interrelation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4419 - The Cold War
Credits: 3.00
A political and social survey of the origins of the Cold War, its development and conclusion.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4420 - The Holocaust
Credits: 3.00
An analysis of the Holocaust, emphasizing aspects of modern European and Jewish history, the origins of European anti-Semitism, and the varied experiences of camp inmates, resisters, perpetrators, bystanders and liberators.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4421 - Mexico since Independence
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the history of Mexico since independence, with special emphasis on selected political, economic and social themes, including U.S.-Mexican relations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4422 - US-Latin American Relations
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the history of relations between Latin America and the United States from 1783 to the present, focusing on the political, economic and social interaction between Americans and Latin Americans.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4423 - Women & Gender in Ancient Wrld
Credits: 3.00
This course aims to introduce students to the roles of women of all social classes in different periods of Ancient Greece and Rome, as well as the problems of studying women's history in the Greco-Roman world. The course will combine a chronological approach with the thematic one, as each week will focus on women's roles and participation in a specific period and/or sphere of activity, such as religion, politics, the dramatic stage, the family and household, and law.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4424 - Apartheid/New South Africa
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the history and historiography of South Africa through selected economic, environmental, social and political themes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4430 - The Vietnam War
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the historical background, events, and impact of the Vietnam War.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4432 - The Roman Republic
Credits: 3.00
This course combines a chronological approach with a thematic one, in order to address such topics as evolution of the government system, social conflict, religion, the Roman family, and the Roman army over the course of the Roman Republic from the expulsion of the kings to the assassination of Julius Caesar.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4433 - Introduction to Modern China
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the modernization process within China from 1500, emphasizing East-West conflict and the emergence of the People's Republic of China.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4436 - French Revolution -- Napoleon
Credits: 3.00
Europe from 1789-1815, with particular emphasis upon France. A study of the French Revolution as the classic model from modern revolutions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4437 - France Since 1815
Credits: 3.00
A survey of French history from Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo in 1815 to the present Fifth French Republic. An examination of the role of French influence on European and world cultures over the last two centuries.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4440 - Modern Germany
Credits: 3.00
A political and social study of Germany since unification with heavy emphasis on the 20th century (1871-Present).
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4441 - Modern Ireland,1780 to Present
Credits: 3.00
A political, social, and cultural study of Ireland since 1780 with special emphasis on the evolution of Irish nationalism and Anglo-Irish relations. The roots and history of 'the Troubles' in Northern Ireland will also be explored.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4443 - Introduction to Modern Japan
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the history of Japan, emphasizing the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Japanese immigration to the United States, and Japanese-American relations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4446 - Soviet Russia
Credits: 3.00
An analysis of Soviet history from the October Revolution of 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, with an emphasis on Stalinism and post-Stalin developments.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4451 - Colonial America, 1492-1763
Credits: 3.00
The history of early America, from the Age of Discovery through the establishment and growth of England's New World colonies, with emphasis on the evolution of American society and culture.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4452 - The Amer Revolution,1763-1783
Credits: 3.00
A study of the origin of America's break with Great Britain with emphasis on the causes of the Revolution, the course of the War of Independence, and the establishment of the new nation's political, social, and cultural institutions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4453 - The New American Rep,1783-1815
Credits: 3.00
The political, diplomatic, economic, and social history of the United States from the end of the American Revolution through the War of 1812.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4454 - Jacksonian America 1815-1848
Credits: 3.00
American history from the end of the War of 1812 to the Mexican War, with emphasis on politics and society. Western expansion also will be emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4455 - Civil War/Reconstrct:1848-1877
Credits: 3.00
American history from the end of the Mexican War to the Compromise of 1877, with special attention to the political, military, and social history of the Civil War.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4461 - Environmental History
Credits: 3.00
A study of American understanding of ecology, wilderness, resource usage, conservation, agriculture, technology, and natural hazards from colonial times to the present.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4463 - American Military History
Credits: 3.00
The history of American warfare from the colonial conflicts through the wars of the 20th century, with emphasis on society's impact on warfare and warfare's impact on American society.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4464 - American Sports History
Credits: 3.00
Traces the history of the development of American sports from the Colonial period to the present with emphasis on the social, cultural, economic, and political factors that are involved.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4465 - US Society and Culture to 1865
Credits: 3.00
Examines the most important social and cultural trends in America from the colonial period to the end of the Civil War.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4466 - US Society and Cult Since 1865
Credits: 3.00
Examines the most important social and cultural trends in the U.S. since the Civil War.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4467 - Women in Amer History to 1877
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the diverse experiences of women and their impact on American History up to 1877.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4468 - Women in Amer History Snc 1877
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the diverse experiences of women and their impact on the history of the United States since 1877.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4469 - The Civil Rights Movement
Credits: 3.00
The history of the Civil Rights Movement with emphasis on major leaders, organizations and events in the twentieth century black freedom struggle.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4471 - Gilded Age&Prgrv Era 1877-1920
Credits: 3.00
Explores the social, political, cultural, economic, and diplomatic history of the U.S. from the end of Reconstruction to the aftermath of World War I.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4472 - The Rise of Mdrn Am,1920-1945
Credits: 3.00
Explores the social, political, cultural, economic, and diplomatic history of the U.S. from the end of World War I to the end of World War II.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4473 - Recent America:U.S. since WWII
Credits: 3.00
Explores the social, political, cultural, economic, and diplomatic history of the U.S. in the second half or the twentieth century.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4474 - History of Georgia
Credits: 3.00
A survey of Georgia history from prehistory to the present, emphasizing politics and society.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4475 - Southern Families & Communit
Credits: 3.00
A study of the approaches to researching and analyzing the history of the varied families and communities in southern history.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4476 - The Old South
Credits: 3.00
A study of the American South from the Colonial Period through the Reconstruction, with special attention on nineteenth century politics and society. Ideas and events leading to secession and Civil War are particularly emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4477 - The New South
Credits: 3.00
A study of the American South since 1865, including the interaction of economic, political, social, and cultural factors, especially in the context of struggles in rural and urban communities and in the textile industry.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4478 - American Religion to 1800
Credits: 3.00
A study of the history of American religious beliefs, practices, and influences on American society, from its colonial settlement to 1800.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4479 - American Religion Since 1800
Credits: 3.00
A study of the history of American religious beliefs and practices, and religion's influence on American society, from 1800 to the present.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4481 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Individual study, with the instructor, taken by majors with permission of the chair and instructor on a topic not regularly offered by the department. May involve a research paper, field research, or reading and discussion.
Lab: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4484 - Senior Seminar
Credits: 3.00
A thematic and capstone course to integrate the student's experience in the field of history. Topics vary with instructors. Complements the course 'The Historian's Craft' and assesses a major's progress.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: HIST 3302 or HIST 2302


HIST 4485 - Special Topics
Credits: 3.00
Courses on topics not usually offered by the department.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4486 - Public History Internship
Credits: 3.00 to 6.00
Experience in applying history in a museum, historical society, archive, historic preservation agency or other public history setting. Students must maintain a journal and develop a portfolio of their work.
Lab: 6.00 to 12.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 4505 - Amer Foreign Policy since 1898
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed as an upper division reading course in American foreign policy. This course will discuss the foreign policy process, the history of American foreign policy and its traditions since 1898, and a variety of approaches to understanding foreign policy. The goal of the course is to provide students with the theoretical and analytical tools needed to understand the history and current processes of American foreign policy. The course will incorporate current events in American foreign policy, as well as historical discussion, as a means of demonstrating the academic concepts of the course in practice.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 4580 - American Foodways
CEUs: 3.00
Food has played a consistent yet complicated role in the shaping of national histories, social relations, personal experiences, and cultures. This course explores how, by examining the various intersections between food and culture from the pre-Columbian period through the present day and across the American landscape.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: ( HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 ) and ( HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 )


HIST 5230 - War, State & Soc Early Mod Eur
Credits: 3.00
A M.A. level introduction to the major approaches and arguments regarding military, social, and political developments in Europe, 1400s to 1700s.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5250 - The First World War
Credits: 3.00
Examines the political, economic, social, cultural, and military history of what George Kennan called the seminal catastrophe of the twentieth century.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5285 - Special Topic in European Hist
Credits: 3.00
Courses on topics in European history not usually offered by the department.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5310 - Comparative Slavery & Emancipa
Credits: 3.00
This course takes a comparative approach to the history of trans-Atlantic slavery and emancipation as it developed in different regions and social contexts in the Atlantic World from the 15th through 19th centuries.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5385 - Special Topic in World History
Credits: 3.00
Courses on topics in world history not usually offered by the department.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5400 - Introduction to Public History
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the development, philosophies and activities in the field of public history and the ethical issues which public historians face.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5401 - Theory & Practice of Oral Hist
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the philosophy, ethics and practice of oral history, with specific training in interview and transcription techniques, and the use of oral history in historical research and analysis.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5402 - Intro to Archival Thry/Pract
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the principles of archival theory and management from appraisal and acquisitions through arrangement, description, preservation and public access. Includes a practicum experience.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5403 - Introduction to Museum Studies
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the philosophy, theory and practice of museum work and a survey of various functions of a museum, including collections, research, education and interpretation, exhibits, and administration.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5404 - Hist of American Architecture
Credits: 3.00
A survey of American architecture in its social and cultural context form colonial America through the present day.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5411 - Europn Renaissnc/Global Perspc
Credits: 3.00
Europe in the early modern era, focusing on the cultural and political history of the Renaissance, the development of overseas empires and the evolution of a scientific world view.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5412 - The Reformation
Credits: 3.00
The development of the Roman Catholic Christian traditions, seen within the context of 16th century Europe.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5417 - 19th Century Europe,1789-1914
Credits: 3.00
This course will survey European social, cultural, and political history from 1789 to 1914. It will consider how men and women of different classes and cultures experienced and understood Europe's lurch into modernity.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5418 - 20th Century Europe
Credits: 3.00
A study of the political and social history of Europe in the 20th century with emphasis on the continuity of events and their interrelation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5419 - The Cold War
Credits: 3.00
A political and social survey of the origins of the Cold War, its development and conclusion.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5420 - The Holocaust
Credits: 3.00
An analysis of the Holocaust, emphasizing aspects of modern European and Jewish history, the origins of European anti-Semitism, and the varied experiences of camp inmates, resisters, perpetrators, bystanders and liberators.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5421 - Mexico since Independence
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the history of Mexico since independence, with special emphasis on selected political, economic and social themes, including US-Mexican relations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5422 - US-Latin American Relations
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the history of relations between Latin America and the United States from 1783 to the present, focusing on the political, economic and social interaction between Americans and Latin Americans.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5423 - Women & Gender in Ancient Wrld
Credits: 3.00
This course aims to introduce students to the roles of women of all social classes in different periods of Ancient Greece and Rome, as well as the problems of studying women's history in the Greco-Roman world. The course will combine a chronological approach with the thematic one, as each week will focus on women's roles and participation in a specific period and/or sphere of activity, such as religion, politics, the dramatic stage, the family and household, and law.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5424 - Conflct,Interdepndnc So Africa
Credits: 3.00
An introduction of the history and historiography of South Africa through selected economic, environmental, social and political themes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5430 - The Vietnam War
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the historical background, events, and impact of the Vietnam War.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5432 - The Roman Republic
Credits: 3.00
This course combines a chronological approach with a thematic one, in order to address such topics as evolution of the government system, social conflict, religion, the Roman family, and the Roman army over the course of the Roman Republic from the expulsion of the kings to the assassination of Julius Caesar.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5433 - Introduction to Modern China
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the modernization process within China from 1500, emphasizing East-West conflict and the emergence of the People's Republic of China.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5436 - French Revolution - Napoleon
Credits: 3.00
Europe from 1789-1815, with particular emphasis upon France. A study of the French Revolution as the classic model for modern revolutions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5437 - France Since 1815
Credits: 3.00
A survey of French history from Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo in 1815 to the present Fifth French Republic. An examination of the role of French influence on European and world cultures over the last two centuries.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5440 - Modern Germany
Credits: 3.00
A political and social study of Germany since unification with heavy emphasis on the 20th century (1871-Present).
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5441 - Modern Ireland,1780 to Present
Credits: 3.00
A political, social, and cultural study of Ireland since 1780 with special emphasis on the evolution of Irish nationalism and Anglo-Irish relations. The roots and history of 'the Troubles' in Northern Ireland will also be explored.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5443 - Introduction to Modern Japan
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the history of Japan, emphasizing the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Japanese immigration to the United States, and Japanese-American relations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5446 - Soviet Russia
Credits: 3.00
An analysis of Soviet history from the October Revolution of 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, with an emphasis on Stalinism and post-Stalin developments.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5451 - Colonial America, 1492-1763
Credits: 3.00
The history of early America, from the Age of Discovery through the establishment and growth of England's New World colonies, with emphasis on the evolution of American society and culture.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5452 - American Revolution, 1763-1783
Credits: 3.00
A study of the origin of America's break with Great Britain, with emphasis on the causes of the Revolution, the course of the War of Independence, and the establishment of the new nation's political, social and cultural institutions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5453 - New Americn Republic,1783-1815
Credits: 3.00
The political, diplomatic, economic and social history of the United States from the end of the American Revolution through the War of 1812.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5454 - Jacksonian America, 1815-1848
Credits: 3.00
American history from the end of the War of 1812 to the Mexican War, with emphasis on politics and society. Western expansion also will be emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5455 - Civil War and Reconstruction
Credits: 3.00
American history from the end of the Mexican War to the Compromise of 1877, with special attention to the political, military and social history of the Civil War.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5461 - Environmental History
Credits: 3.00
A study of American understanding of ecology, wilderness, resource usage, conservation, agriculture, technology, and natural hazards from colonial times to the present.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5463 - American Military History
Credits: 3.00
This history of American warfare from the colonial conflicts through the wars of the 20th century, with emphasis on society's impact on warfare and warfare's impact on American society.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5464 - American Sports History
Credits: 3.00
Traces the history of the development of American sports from the Colonial period to the present with emphasis on the social, cultural, economic, and political factors that influences American society.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5465 - U.S. Society & Culture to 1865
Credits: 3.00
Examines the most important social and cultural trends in America from the colonial period to the end of the Civil War.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5466 - US Society and Cult since 1865
Credits: 3.00
Examines the most important social and cultural trends in the US since the Civil War.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5467 - Women in American Hist to 1877
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the diverse experiences of women and their impact on American History up to 1877.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5468 - Women in Amer Hist since 1877
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the various experiences of women and their impact on the history of the United States since 1877.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5469 - The Civil Rights Movement
Credits: 3.00
The history of the Civil Rights Movement with emphasis on major leaders, organizations, and events in the twentieth century black freedom struggle.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5471 - Gilded Age&Prgrv Era,1877-1920
Credits: 3.00
Explores the social, political, cultural, economic, and diplomatic history of the U.S. from the end of Reconstruction to the aftermath of World War I.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5472 - Rise of Modern Amer:1920-1945
Credits: 3.00
Explores the social, political, cultural, economic, and diplomatic history of the U.S. from the end of World War I to the end of World War II.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5473 - Recent America:U.S. Since WWII
Credits: 3.00
Explores the social, political, cultural, economic, and diplomatic history of the U.S. in the second half of the twentieth century.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5474 - History of Georgia
Credits: 3.00
A survey of Georgia history from prehistory to the present, emphasizing politics and society.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5475 - Southern Families & Community
Credits: 3.00
A study of the approaches to researching and analyzing the history of the varied families and communities in southern history.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5476 - The Old South
Credits: 3.00
A study of the American South from the Colonial Period through the Reconstruction with special attention on nineteenth century politics and society. Ideas and events leading to secession and Civil War are particularly emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5477 - The New South
Credits: 3.00
A study of the American South since 1865 including the interaction of economic, political, social and cultural factors, especially in the context of struggles in rural and urban communities and in the textile industry.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5478 - American Religion to 1800
Credits: 3.00
A study of the history of American religious beliefs, practices, and influences on American society, from its colonial settlement to 1800.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5479 - American Religion Since 1800
Credits: 3.00
A study of the history of American religious beliefs and practices, and religion's influence on American society, from 1800 to present.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5485 - Special Topics
Credits: 3.00
Courses on topics not usually offered by the department.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 5505 - Ame Foreign Policys since 1898
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed as a graduate reading course in American foreign policy. This course will discuss the foreign policy process, the history of American foreign policy and its traditions since 1898, and a variety of approaches to understanding foreign policy. The goal of the course is to provide students with the theoretical and analytical tools needed to understand the history and current processes of American foreign policy. The course will incorporate current events in American foreign policy, as well as historical discussion, as a means of demonstrating the academic concepts of the course in practice.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6201 - Archives Arrangemnt Practicum
Credits: 3.00
Advanced training in arranging, describing and processing archival collections for graduate students interested in archives work.
Other: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6202 - Thry/Mthd Material Cult Stdy
Credits: 3.00
Examines methods and theories for studying material culture from an interdisciplinary perspective, analyzing what material culture reveals about the culture and society in which it was created with an emphasis on America. Required for Museum Studies Certificate.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6203 - Studies/Rsrch in Amer Folklife
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the traditional, expressive, shared culture of various groups in the United States through its history, emphasizing analysis of regional folklife traditions and folklife research and fieldwork methods.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6283 - Continuing Research
Credits: 1.00
This course is for students completing degree requirements who will be using staff time or University facilities and for whom no regular course is appropriate.
Lab: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6301 - Adm of Museums/Historic Sites
Credits: 3.00
Study of administrative functions: governance, financing, grant-writing, public relations, marketing, human resources, accreditation, and museum law and ethics. Taught in association with Atlanta History Center.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6302 - Collections Mgmt in Museums
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the processes by which a museum manages it collection. Taught in association with Atlanta History Center and involves a practicum experience.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6303 - Educ/Interpretation at Museums
Credits: 3.00
Studies include interpretative principles and techniques, school programs, adult and community programs, staffing, marketing and other programming logistics. Taught in association with Atlanta History Center.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6304 - Exhibits at Museums/Hist Sites
Credits: 3.00
An examination of how museums create exhibits using various interpretive techniques, from planning and research through exhibit design, display techniques, script-writing and installation. Taught in association with Atlanta History Center.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6413 - The Atlantic World
CEUs: 3.00
A transnational perspective emphasizing connections between Europe, Africa, and the Americas from the period of European maritime exploration to the age of revolution. Topics include the expansion of empires and the mercantile capitalism, slavery and the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and interactions between Europeans, Africans and Native Americans.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6481 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Individual study with the instructor taken by majors with permission of chair and instructor on a topic not regularly offered by the dept. May involve a research paper, field research or reading and discussion.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6486 - Public History Internship
Credits: 3.00
Experience in applying history in a museum, historical society, archive, historic preservation agency, or other public history setting. Students must maintain a journal develop a portfolio of their work.
Other: 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6580 - American Foodways
CEUs: 3.00
Food has played a consistent yet complicated role in the shaping of national histories, social relations, personal experiences, and cultures. This course explores how, by examining the various intersections between food and culture from the pre-Columbian period through the present day and across the American landscape.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6684 - Historiography
Credits: 3.00
Historiography, or the historian's craft, is an introduction to the history of historical thought from its emergence in the classical world to the present. The course will cover many of the major historigraphical schools and ideas that have developed over time. Student will study the tools and methods of various historians, how they formulate hypotheses from gathering of information, and how different historians write about the same era or subjects. Required of all M.A. history graduates.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6685 - Special Problems
Credits: 1.00 to 6.00
Assignments by major professors which could involve special lectures, research and readings. Approval of major professor and department chair needed before enrolling.
Lab: 1.00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6686 - Topics in European History
Credits: 3.00
A seminar class with specific titles announced at time of offering. Transcript entries carry different nomenclatures to correspond to material taught. Seminars will vary according to topic and the specialty of the professor offering the course.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6687 - Topics in United States Hist
Credits: 3.00
A seminar class with specific titles announced at time of its offering. Transcript entries carry different nomenclatures to correspond to material taught. Seminars will vary according to topic and the specialty of the professor offering the course.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6688 - Topics in Latin Amer History
Credits: 3.00
A seminar course with specific titles announced each term. Transcript entries carry different nomenclatures to correspond to the materials taught.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6689 - Topics in Georgia History
Credits: 3.00
A seminar class with specific titles announced at time of offering. Transcript entries carry different nomenclatures to correspond to material taught. Seminar will vary according to topic and the specialty of the professor offering the course.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History


HIST 6694 - Historical Methods & Writing
Credits: 3.00
This course builds on the process begun in HIST 6684 (Historiography) in training students to think, research, and write as professional historians. Students will learn to carry out advanced, original research using primary sources; incorporate historiography into their own work; and write effectively for an academic audience. Required of all M.A. history graduates.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History
Pre-requisites: HIST 6684


HIST 6699 - Thesis
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Thesis.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Humanities
Department: History



Honors

Honors


HONR 2102 - Soph Honr Colloquium: Inquiry
Credits: 1.00
Learning Outcomes: a) Students will select and use information to investigate a point of view or conclusion. b) Students will demonstrate information-use strategies and full understanding of ethical and legal restrictions upon information. c) Students will contribute to an e-portfolio
Lecture: 1.00
College: No College Designated
Department: Honors


HONR 3102 - Jr Honr Colloquium: Engagement
Credits: 1.00
Learning Outcomes: a) Students will formulate a specific, imaginative position b) Students will design, evaluate and implement a strategy to answer an open-ended question or achieve a desired research goal c) Students will submit an Honors College thesis proposal identifying a project and a mentor d) Students will contribute to an e-portfolio No syllabus is attached to allow faculty flexibility in designing the course to meet these learning outcomes.
Lecture: 1.00
College: No College Designated
Department: Honors


HONR 4102 - Sr Honors Colloquium
Credits: 1.00
Learning Outcomes: a) Students will synthesize and express connections from more than one educational experience at UWG that deepen their understanding of their field of study. b) Students will demonstrate a developing sense of self as a learner and apply themselves to new contexts. c) Students will submit and defend an Honors College thesis d) Students will complete their e-portfolio No syllabus is attached to allow faculty flexibility in designing the course to meet these learning outcomes.
Lecture: 1.00
College: No College Designated
Department: Honors


HONR 4385 - Special Topics
CEUs: 3.00
An in-depth examination of a topic that transcends the boundaries of the fixed curriculum.
Lecture: 3.00
College: Honors College
Department: Honors
Pre-requisites: Honors Student - HONE



HR Management

HR Management


HRMT 3390 - Employment Law
Credits: 3.00
Human Resources Law is an upper-level management course intended for Human Resources majors and other students interested in personnel law. This course is intended to provide a solid understanding of employment law for human resources professionals. Extensive use will be made of case law in addition to discussion and readings. Students are expected to prepare and present cases, as well as discussing them with others in the class.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: MGNT 3600 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 312


HRMT 3670 - Intro to Human Resource Mgt
Credits: 3.00
This course is intended as an overview of the field of human resource management. Emphasis will be placed on management responsibilities regarding the organization's human resources.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: MGNT 3600 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 312 Minimum Grade: C


HRMT 4650 - Performance Management
Credits: 3.00
This course covers the continuous cyclical process of developing employees and positioning them for success, with emphasis on orientation programs, training and development, performance appraisals and feedback, talent management, employee relations, discipline, retention, and termination.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: MGNT 3650 Minimum Grade: C


HRMT 4670 - HR Staffing
Credits: 3.00
An overview of the personnel management function in organizations. It serves as an introductory course for the prospective personnel officer and as a survey of personnel responsibilities and activities for any manager with supervisory responsibilities.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ( MGNT 3600 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 312 Minimum Grade: C ) and MGNT 3670


HRMT 4680 - Compensation Management
Credits: 3.00
This course comes under the broad area of financial management and deals with rewards for the supply of labor. It addresses the ways in which both tangible and intangible forms of compensation may be used to motivate and reward employee performance. The course also deals with job analysis, job description and job evaluation on the basis of compensable factors as well as designing an equitable pay structure. Additionally, compensation management analyzes the influence of unions and government in determining the compensation of the labor force. It deals with the compensation of both hourly workers and managerial employees.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: MGNT 3600 Minimum Grade: C


HRMT 4690 - Labor Management Relations
Credits: 3.00
An analysis of the industrial relations problems between organized labor and management, and the interrelationships of the union, its members, and the nonunion workers.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: MGNT 3600 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 312 Minimum Grade: C


HRMT 4790 - Current Issues in Human Resour
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed as a capstone course for students majoring in Human Resource Management and will be conducted as a seminar. Current issues in the HR arena will serve as the springboard for research and discussion. Students will have the opportunity to engage others in the field and the instructor in a collegial atmosphere designed to stimulate an appreciation and thorough understanding of the issues in the field. In addition, students will have an opportunity to engage in a project that allows them to apply leanring from prior classes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: MGNT 4670 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 421



Integrated Science (ISCI)

Integrated Science (ISCI)


ISCI 2001 - Life/Earth Science
Credits: 3.00
This course is an integrative, interdisciplinary approach to the study of life and earth science. It introduces basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities for students to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about their environment. The laboratory component of the course allows students to have hands-on experience with scientific ideas and principles. Satisfies area F or Early Childhood Education.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: No College Designated
Department: Interdisciplinary Studies Ctr


ISCI 2002 - Physical Science
Credits: 3.00
This is an interdisciplinary, activity based science course satisfying Area F requirements of the Early Childhood Education program. Topics in physical science and astronomy will be covered to address content covered by the Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) for K-5. The laboratory will incorporate inquiry based teaching and learning opportunities for the students.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 2.00
College: No College Designated
Department: Interdisciplinary Studies Ctr



Information Technology

Information Technology


ITW 1130 - Intro to Information Technolgy
CEUs: 3.00
An introduction to IT as an academic discipline and the structure of the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology degree. It also provides students with an introduction to the range of applications of Information Technology. Finally, it introduces students to some of the techniques that they will need for later courses.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor


ITW 1330 - Programming for Info Technolgy
CEUs: 3.00
Introduction to basic concepts and techniques of a contemporary programming language. Topics include language syntax, variables, decision structures, loop structures, functions, and IDE. Development of modular programs for event-driven applications.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: MATH 1111 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 1430 - Web Page Development
CEUs: 3.00
A thorough introduction to the languages used to create web pages. Throughout it stresses the importance of good coding style. The course also introduces students to the principles of good human computer interface design, including design for people with disabilities. Finally, the course introduces students to an object-based language.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: eMajor Introduction Quiz C


ITW 2140 - Discrete Math for Info Tech
CEUs: 3.00
Covers important discrete mathematical objects such as sets, relations and functions, graphs and trees as it relates to the field of Information Technology. An introduction to mathematical logic and reasoning, and the concept of an algorithm and its complexity will be covered.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: MATH 1111 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 2333 - IT Infrastructure
CEUs: 3.00
This course allows students to develop a thorough understanding of the IT infrastructure which includes computer hardware and networks that support various IT applications, and network security. This course allows students to develop this knowledge as well as some fundamental skills in server, network system administration and management, and to become aware of the importance of information assurance and security in the design, implementation and administration of an IT Infrastructure.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 1130 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 2430 - Data Programming I
CEUs: 3.00
The course provides students with an introduction to the main concepts in programming including variables, expressions, statements, conditional execution, functions, iteration, strings, and files.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 1130 Minimum Grade: C and ITW 1430 Minimum Grade: C and MATH 2130 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 2431 - Data Programming II
CEUs: 3.00
The course provides students with an introduction to the main concepts in programming related to data. The course focuses on data storage and the use of regular expressions to search data. The course also includes an overview of object oriented concepts.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 2430 Minimum Grade: C and ( MATH 1232 or MATH 1441 )


ITW 2530 - Operating Systems
CEUs: 3.00
Principles of the management of memory, processors, processes and deadlocks, synchronization of computing tasks, files, devices, and systems. Principles of network organization and network operating systems. Analysis and evaluation of comparative operating systems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 1130 Minimum Grade: C or ITW 2333 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 2531 - Intro to Cyber Security
CEUs: 3.00
This course teaches the fundamental concepts and principles of cyber security techniques. Topics include computer and network security, cyber stalking, social networks, fraud and abuse, web security, malware, computer viruses, encryption, techniques used by hackers and how to combat them, simulation and identification of different threat models, software vulnerabilities analysis, risk assessment and mitigation, prediction of potential attack vectors through data analysis and evaluation. Hands on activities will be performed with emphasis on personal cyber and information security.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor


ITW 3133 - E-Commerce
CEUs: 3.00
Principles and practices of E-commerce. including transaction and electronic payment systems, and business, legal, and security issues as they relate to E-commerce.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 3233 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 3230 - Data Visualizatoin
CEUs: 3.00
This course introduces students to the field of data visualization. The course covers basic design and evaluation principles to prepare and analyze large datasets, and standard visualization techniques for different types of data. The course prepares students to communicate clearly, efficiently, and in a visually compelling manner to a variety of audiences.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 3233 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 3231 - Data Communications
CEUs: 3.00
Fundamentals of practical aspects of computer networks and data communications; standards, protocols, topologies, architectures, routing devices, wireless technologies, and monitoring and management.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 2530 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 3233 - Database Design & Implementatn
CEUs: 3.00
The course provides students with the opportunity to develop in-depth knowledge of database design, implementation, and systems development. The course covers data modeling concepts, approaches and techniques, and stages in database development processes (conceptual and logical design, implementation and maintenance). The course also covers methods and approaches used in system analysis and design, including the system development life cycle. To reinforce the course concepts, students will carry out projects based on real world situations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 2430 Minimum Grade: C and MATH 2130 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 3234 - Systems Acquistn, Design,&Imp
CEUs: 3.00
This course provides a study of the acquisition, design, and implementation of information technology systems, including methods for investigating solutions, project planning and control, documentation, and specifications.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 3233 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 3432 - Analytics Programming
CEUs: 3.00
The course provides students with the necessary tools and techniques to manipulate, process, clean and analyze data at an advanced level using Python. Specifically, students will use IPython, NumbPy, and pandas to load, clean, transform, visualize and analyze data.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 2431 Minimum Grade: C and ITW 3233 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 3530 - Fund of Info Systems Security
CEUs: 3.00
Current standards and best practice in information assurance and security. Topics include the evaluation of security models, threat analysis, security risk assessment and risk mitigation, disaster recovery planning, cryptography and encryption algorithms, and security policy formation and implementation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor


ITW 3531 - Digital and Computer Forensics
CEUs: 3.00
This course introduces the processes and methodologies of Digital and Computer Forensics. Topics include the proper acquisition, preservation, analysis, and presentation of digital evidence. The course also covers the fundamental knowledge and lab-based skills of digital forensics across various platforms, operating systems, networks and in the cloud. This includes file systems such as NTFS and EXT3/4, partitions, inodes, data sectors and clusters, slack space, Linux and Windows scripting and commands, as well as open source and proprietary digital forensic tools.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 2531 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 4130 - IT Issues and Management
CEUs: 3.00
Covers case studies of IT development projects to assist the student in the recognition of the need of an IT development project. The student will study and critique the development, implementation and management of both successful and unsuccessful projects.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 3234 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 4135 - Data Analytics
CEUs: 3.00
This course covers the basic issues involved in building and populating a data mart to support the planning, designing and building of business intelligence applications and data analytics. Core concepts related to business intelligence and analytics are covered.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 3233 Minimum Grade: C and BUSA 3131 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 4136 - Knowledge Disc and Data Mining
CEUs: 3.00
The course covers the process of automatically extracting valid, useful, and previously unknown information from data sources and using the information to make decisions. This course is designed to provide students with a solid understanding of the knowledge discovery process and the use of data mining concepts and tools as part of that process.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 3233 Minimum Grade: C and BUSA 3131 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 4336 - Network Security
CEUs: 3.00
Concepts of network security, including: countermeasures and safeguards to networks such as remote access controls, firewalls, intrusion detection systems, data encryption, and virtual private networks.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 3530 Minimum Grade: D


ITW 4337 - Ethical Hacking
CEUs: 3.00
Concepts of hacker techniques and tools, including: cryptographic concepts, a technical overview of hacking, including port scanning, enumeration of computer systems, wireless vulnerabilities, web and database attacks, malware, and penetration testing. Social aspects of hacking, including social engineering. Incident response.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 3530 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 4530 - Senior Capstone Project
CEUs: 3.00
This course provides students with the opportunity to develop in-depth knowledge of IT project design and implementation. The course covers the main topics of IT project management including requirements specification, project integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resources, communications, and risk management. In addition, techniques and methods used in IT project management will be covered. To reinforce the course concepts, students will complete projects related to their specialization.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor
Pre-requisites: ITW 3234 Minimum Grade: C


ITW 4790 - Internship in Information Tech
CEUs: 3.00
A campus-approved and coordinated IT-experience-based internship will be required of each student. The internship will include at least 280 hours of work. A written report by the student, along with an employer evaluation of the student's work will be required.
Lecture: 3.00
College: eMajor



Library

Library


LIBR 2100 - Info Literacy & Research
Credits: 2.00
This course is an introduction to information literacy and scholarly discourse: the ability to find, evaluate, and ethically use information both in- and outside of the classroom. Students will examine how they currently use information and critically reflect on how that information is shaped by political, cultural, and social forces.
Lecture: 2.00
College: Library
Department: Library



Mathematics

Mathematics


MATH 0996 - Support for Elementary Stats
CEUs: 1.00
This Learning Support course provides corequisite support for students enrolled in MATH – Elementary Statistics. Topics will parallel topics being studied in MATH 1401 and the course will provide support for the essential skills needed to be successful in MATH 1401. Taken with MATH 1401, topics to be covered will include descriptive statistics, probability theory, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and other selected statistics topics.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Co-requisites: MATH 1401


MATH 0997 - Support for Quantitative Reas
CEUs: 1.00 to 3.00
This Learning Support course is intended to provide corequisite support for students requiring remediation in mathematics while they are enrolled in MATH 1001 – Quantitative Reasoning. Topics will parallel topics being studied in MATH 1001 as well as the essential quantitative skills needed to be successful in MATH 1001. Taken with MATH 1001, topics to be covered will include logic, basic probability, data analysis and modeling from data.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Co-requisites: MATH 1001


MATH 0999 - Support for College Algebra
CEUs: 1.00 to 3.00
This Learning Support course is intended to provide corequisite support for students requiring remediation in mathematics while they are enrolled in MATH 1111 – College Algebra. Topics will parallel topics being studied in MATH 1111 as well as the essential quantitative skills needed to be successful in MATH 1111. Taken with MATH 1111, this course provides an in-depth study of the properties of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions as needed for calculus. Emphasis is on using algebraic and graphical techniques for solving problems involving linear, quadratic, piece-wise defined, rational, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Co-requisites: MATH 1111
Pre-requisites: SAT Math 340 or ACT Math 14 or MATH 1001 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1101 Minimum Grade: C


MATH 1001 - Quantitative Skills &Reasoning
Credits: 3.00
This course is an alternative in Area A of the Core Curriculum and is not intended to supply sufficient algebraic background for students who intend to take Precalculus or the Calculus sequence for science majors. This course places quantitative skills and reasoning in the context of experiences that students will likely encounter. It emphasizes processing information in context from a variety of representations, understanding of both the information and the processing, and understanding which conclusions can be reasonably determined.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: Learning Support Math 2: 3


MATH 1001L - Quantitative Reasoning Lab
Credits: 1.00
This lab is intended to provide co-requisite support for students requiring assistance in mathematics while they are enrolled in MATH 1001 – Quantitative Reasoning. Topics will parallel topics being studied in MATH 1001 as well as the essential quantitative skills needed to be successful in MATH 1001. Taken with MATH 1001, topics to be covered will include logic, basic probability, data analysis and modeling from data.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Co-requisites: MATH 1001


MATH 1101 - Intro to Math Modeling
Credits: 3.00
This course is an introduction to mathematical modeling using graphical, numerical, symbolic, and verbal techniques to describe and explore real-world data and phenomena. Emphasis is on the use of elementary functions to investigate and analyze applied problems and questions, supported by the use of appropriate technology, and on effective communications of quantitative concepts and results. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: Learning Support Math 2: 3


MATH 1111 - College Algebra
Credits: 3.00
This course is a functional approach to algebra that incorporates the use of appropriate technology. Emphasis will be placed on the study of functions and their graphs. This includes linear, quadratic, piece-wide defined, inequalities, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Appropriate applications will be included. Credit for Math 1111 is not allowed if the student already has credit for Math 1113 or higher. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: Learning Support Math 1: 3


MATH 1111L - College Algebra Lab
Credits: 1.00
This lab is intended to provide co-requisite support for students requiring assistance in mathematics while they are enrolled in MATH 1111 – College Algebra. Topics will parallel topics being studied in MATH 1111 as well as the essential quantitative skills needed to be successful in MATH 1111. Taken with MATH 1111, this course provides an in-depth study of the properties of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions as needed for calculus. Emphasis is on using algebraic and graphical techniques for solving problems involving linear, quadratic, piece-wise defined, rational, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions.
Lecture: .00 Lab: 2.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Co-requisites: MATH 1111
Pre-requisites: MATH 1001 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1101 Minimum Grade: C or ACT Math 14 or SAT Math 340


MATH 1112 - Trigonometry & Analyt Geometry
Credits: 3.00
This course is to introduce students to the trigonometric functions and their applications in science and Calculus and an introduction to Analytic Geometry. Students cannot receive credit for MATH 1112 and MATH 1113.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 1111 Minimum Grade: C


MATH 1113 - Precalculus
Credits: 3.00 to 4.00
This course is designed to prepare students for calculus, physics, and related technical subjects. Topics include an intensive study of algebraic and transcendental functions accompanied by analytic geometry and trigonometry. Students cannot receive credit for MATH 1112 and MATH 1113. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/
Lecture: 3.00 to 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 1111 Minimum Grade: D or SAT Math 500 or ACT Math 20


MATH 1401 - Elementary Statistics
Credits: 3.00
This is a non-calculus based introduction to statistics. Course content includes descriptive statistics, probability theory, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and other selected statistical topics. Prerequisites: Math 1101 Mathematical Modeling, 1111 College Algebra, or 1113 Precalculus or approved equivalent.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: Learning Support Math 2: 3


MATH 1413 - Survey of Calculus
Credits: 3.00
A survey of the differential and integral calculus of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions is given. Detailed applications to problems and concepts from business, economics and life science are covered.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1111 Minimum Grade: C or MAT 151 Minimum Grade: C


MATH 1501 - Calculus I
Credits: 4.00
Topics to include functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, antidifferentiation, the definite integral, and applications. Prerequisites: Math 1113 - Pre-calculus or its equivalent. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: eCore Introduction Quiz C or eCore Course C and MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C


MATH 1634 - Calculus I
Credits: 4.00
The first of a three-course sequence in calculus. Limits, applications of derivatives to problems in geometry and the sciences (physical and behavioral). Problems which lead to anti-derivatives.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 1112 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C


MATH 2008 - Found of Numbers & Operations
Credits: 3.00
This course is an Area F introductory mathematics course for early childhood education majors. This course will emphasize the understanding and use of the major concepts of numbers and operations. As a general theme, strategies of problem solving will be used and discussed in the context of various topics.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 1111 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1001 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1101 Minimum Grade: C


MATH 2009 - Sophomore Seminar
Credits: 1.00
The impact of mathematics in the real world will be presented in the form of lectures, computer labs, and seminars offered by the department of mathematics faculty. The course includes problem solving sessions involving competition problems (e.g. Putnam, MCM, IMO,...) and the use of the technology and computer Algebra systems, such as Maple and Matlab. The course also explores applications of mathematics to the real world, its history and connection to other sciences through projects and reports. A final exam will assess their understanding of the subject matter discussed throughout the course.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 1112 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C


MATH 2644 - Calculus II
Credits: 4.00
A continuation of MATH 1634. The definite integral and applications, calculus of transcendental functions, standard techniques of integration, sequences and series.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 1634 Minimum Grade: C or MAT 262 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1501 Minimum Grade: C


MATH 2654 - Calculus III
Credits: 4.00
A continuation of MATH 2644. Topics include functions of two, three, and more variables, multiple integrals, and topics in vector calculus.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 2644 Minimum Grade: C


MATH 2853 - Elementary Linear Algebra
Credits: 3.00
A concrete, applied approach to matrix theory and linear algebra. Topics include matrices and their connection to systems of linear equations, Gauss-Jordan elimination, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and diagonalization. The use of mathematical software is a component of the course.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 1634 or MATH 1501


MATH 3003 - Transition to Advanced Math
Credits: 3.00
A transition course to advanced mathematics. Topics include logic, set theory, properties of integers and mathematical induction, relations, and functions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 2644 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 2853 Minimum Grade: C


MATH 3243 - Advanced Calculus
Credits: 3.00
A rigorous introduction to the fundamental concepts of single-variable calculus. Topics included the real numbers, limits, continuity, uniform continuity, differentiation, integration, and sequences and series.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 3003 Minimum Grade: C


MATH 3303 - Ordinary Differential Equation
Credits: 3.00
Modeling with and solutions of ordinary differential equations, including operators, Laplace transforms, and series; systems of ODE's, and numerical approximations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 2644 Minimum Grade: C


MATH 3353 - Methods of Applied Mathematics
Credits: 3.00
Solutions of PDE's using orthogonal function systems. Studies of classical boundary-value problems, including the heat equation, wave equation, and potential. Integral transform and numerical methods of solutions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 3303


MATH 3703 - Geometry for P-8 Teachers
Credits: 3.00
(Non-credit for mathematics major or minor.) Special emphasis for teachers of grades P-8. Logic; real numbers; basic and transformational geometry; measurement, including the metric system; problem solving; methods and materials for teaching mathematics at the P-8 level. A continuation of MATH 2703.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and MATH 2008 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1634 or MATH 2703


MATH 3803 - Algebra for P-8 Teachers I
Credits: 3.00
(Non-credit for mathematics major or minor.) Special emphasis for teachers of grades P-8. Broadens understanding of the fundamental concepts of algebra, with particular attention to specific methods and materials of instruction. Special emphasis for teachers of grades P-8.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: Teacher Education Admission TE and MATH 2008 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1634 or MATH 2703


MATH 3805 - Functions & Modeling
Credits: 3.00
This is a mathematics course designed to address the unique needs of future teachers of mathematics. It is required of UTEACH math majors and also counts toward their mathematics degree. In the course, students engage in explorations and lab activities designed to strengthen and expand their knowledge of the topics found in secondary mathematics. Course is restricted to UTEACH students.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 1634 and MATH 2853


MATH 3825 - Research Methods
Credits: 3.00
Specially designed to meet the needs of future teachers, students design and carry out four independent inquiries, which they write up and present in the manner that is common in the scientific community. Course is restricted to UTEACH students.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C


MATH 4003 - Dynamical Systems
Credits: 3.00
A computational introduction to dynamical systems. Topics include discrete and continuous systems, bifurcations, stability, and chaos: Julia and Mandelbrot sets, applications to biology and physics.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 2644


MATH 4013 - Numerical Analysis
Credits: 3.00
The practices and pitfalls of numerical computation. Topics include floating point representations; precision, accuracy, and error; numerical solution techniques for various types of problems; root finding, interpolation, differentiation, integration, systems of linear and ordinary differentiation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 2644


MATH 4043 - Number Theory
Credits: 3.00
An in-depth study of selected topics in number theory.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 2853 and MATH 3003 Minimum Grade: C


MATH 4103 - Operations Research
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to linear and nonlinear programming. Topics include the formulation of linear programming models; the simplex method, duality and sensitivity; integer programming, the use of spreadsheets and software applications to solve constrained optimization problems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 2644


MATH 4153 - Applied Mathematical Modeling
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the creation and use of mathematical models. Mathematical techniques will be developed and applied to real systems in areas including chemistry, biology, physics and economics. Students will be expected to make written and oral presentations in a professional manner. This course will emphasize the creation and testing of models and discussions of errors and forecasting. Students will work on projects singly and as part of a group.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Science & Math.
Department: Mathematics
Pre-requisites: MATH 2644


MATH 4203 - Mathematical Probability
Credits: 3.00
A calculus based statistics course with a strong emphasis on probability theory. Exercises are both theo